Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Non-Airline Forums > Private Flying
Reload this Page >

How to handle Stomach drop during PPL

Private Flying LAA/BMAA/BGA/BPA The sheer pleasure of flight.

How to handle Stomach drop during PPL

Old 27th Apr 2019, 12:47
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 15
How to handle Stomach drop during PPL

HI all,

not it sure if this is right place, Iím currently in my ppl stage

Iíve never liked roller coasters and neither the feeling of my stomach dropping.

What is the best way to deal/cope with the above feeling and not turn into a gurning pile of mush?

Tensing stomach? Repeated exposure?

Thoughts would be real helpful.

Kind Regards

Angels
AngelsTen is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 13:46
  #2 (permalink)  
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 59
Posts: 4,449
Angles,

Repeated exposure will help. Also, look outside at the horizon al lot (you should be anyway) Do not focus insider the cockpit for extended time, nor look high or low a lot - keep your head level, and your stomach will follow. The other thing is to fly the plane, rather than ride while you instructor flies. Your instructor must demonstrate, and perhaps correct, but otherwise, you should be flying as much as you can master the minimum skill. Certainly when I have been in the right seat to another pilot (particularly if he flew not smoothly), sometimes I would ask to fly for a while to calm my tummy. Conversely, during some flight testing I have flown with a second pilot, I have had them ask to fly for a bit for the same reason. If you are flying steep turns, avoid looking down out the side window, look forward out the windshield. Don't tense your stomach, it won't help.

That said, aside from specific maneuvers, there should not be too much "up and down" during routine flying. Yes, there will be turbulence, and honestly, most pilots can be taken to the point of upset tummy in enough turbulence, so you're not alone.
Pilot DAR is online now  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 14:33
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Here
Posts: 1,816
As Pilot DAR says, you're unlikely to feel unwell whilst flying yourself - it's as a passenger that you're more vulnerable.

Additionally, a half-full stomach and no sweet fizzy drinks just before flying also helps...

Good luck, welcome to the best activity in the world - though some might argue there is one activity that's better...
Sam Rutherford is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 18:28
  #4 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 15
Thanks for the replies!

I shall apply the advice given to me next time Iím up.

Kind Regards

Angels
AngelsTen is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 20:19
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Moray,Scotland,U.K.
Posts: 1,452
I came to power flying from winch launched gliders, a few hundred launches, with many cable-breaks. I'd lost sensitivity to that feeling long before. Maybe try 3 winch launch pax flights? Simulated cable breaks? And the unpleasantness wouldn't be associated with power flying.
Maoraigh1 is online now  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 23:34
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Wellington,NZ
Age: 62
Posts: 1,634
I didn't like the sensation when first exposed, either.
I found repeated exposure to do the trick, aided by the attitude of an instructor that actually liked the feeling of reduced or zero "G". Don't force it. Just gradually build up your tolerance and acceptance of the feeling, by 'roller-coasting' the aircraft yourself, gently at first, more vigorously as you get the hang of it. (Always check for traffic, cabin security etc.)
Don't be surprised if, should you get a bit enthusiastic with the zero g, the engine loses power briefly, if it's a carburetor model. Float bowls and needle valves don't work properly upside down. Power will restore within a second or so of restoring any positive load.

Ginger capsules are a natural way to help prevent motion sickness, if that's a worry.
Tarq57 is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 01:06
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: CYYC (Calgary)
Posts: 5,257
Lots of good advice there.

One thing that might help is to make sure your lap belt is tight, so that you don’t get lifted off the seat in turbulence.
India Four Two is online now  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 01:27
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: SF Bay area, CA USA
Posts: 255
Lots of full stalls in an aircraft with a good break, such as C152 or C172. Maybe spin an AeroBat, with an instructor
jack11111 is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 09:27
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 1,057
Originally Posted by AngelsTen View Post
Iíve never liked roller coasters and neither the feeling of my stomach dropping.
...
Angels
Patty Wagstaff's talk at Oskosh last year said that it is natural for people not to like the feel of falling.
When I learnt to fly I hated stalls. I preferred the incipient spin exercises in the Cessna 150 as the wing drop was less unpleasant than the nose drop. My instructor offered to demo a spin and I declined. Solo stall exercises - I'd lie when I reported to the instructor upon return - I just did those incipient spins that he had demonstrated.
I later got him to teach me aerobatics.
That was over 50 years ago and aerobatics is about all that I have done since. I still teach aerobatics, stalls and spins. I still don't go on roller coasters!
djpil is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 12:29
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: UK
Age: 81
Posts: 699
Many stomach problems are due to 'nerves'. In fact in normal training flights you will see little turbulence and no switchback flying.
Worrying about something often brings it on.
I suppose that I should add that stalling practice is the exception to the rule.
funfly is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2019, 08:40
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: N.YORKSHIRE
Posts: 855
Porridge. Nice and thick. Made with milk. Sweeten as required.
Flyingmac is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2019, 12:53
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Central UK
Posts: 391
Originally Posted by Flyingmac View Post
Porridge. Nice and thick. Made with milk. Sweeten as required.
Yek! Gurgles hideously over a microphone. Please don't!

Stalls? Piffle! For proper stomach drop there's nothing like the swooping, half inverted plunge into a spin!
meleagertoo is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2019, 15:05
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Darlington, UK
Posts: 32
Originally Posted by Flyingmac View Post
Porridge. Nice and thick. Made with milk. Sweeten as required.
Almost lost all of my porridge one morning while doing autorotations, I think we did 17! The helicopter was up and down like a whores drawers.
miller745 is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2019, 16:29
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Augusta, Georgia, USA (back from Germany again)
Posts: 152
A10,

Originally Posted by AngelsTen View Post

Iíve never liked roller coasters and neither the feeling of my stomach dropping.
I thoroughly dislike roller coasters or similar rides. But I really enjoy aerobatics. Much easier/better than any "vomit comet" ride. Much more fun, too.

Acclimation works wonders. The advice above is great. If you focus on the outside you should be relatively free of issues. I've read many stories of people who were "ill" for the first few hours but didn't give up.

Enjoy!

Terry
LTCTerry is offline  
Old 30th Apr 2019, 07:13
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Lichfield
Posts: 16
Originally Posted by funfly View Post
I suppose that I should add that stalling practice is the exception to the rule.

..hrrm damn and I thought normal pilots got used to stalls and considered them just another standard manoeuvre...
onionabroad is offline  
Old 30th Apr 2019, 09:01
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Ashford, Kent
Age: 29
Posts: 202
Strapped in tight. Brace yourself and tense your stomach muscles hard!
Lew747 is online now  
Old 30th Apr 2019, 20:27
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Cambridge, England, EU
Posts: 3,437
Originally Posted by onionabroad View Post
..hrrm damn and I thought normal pilots got used to stalls and considered them just another standard manoeuvre...
Stalls were never a problem for me, but the incipient spin now ... I got an instructor to show me a fully developed spin, btw, which wasn't upsetting at all, it was the incipient bit that I found nasty.

Oh, and the one winch launch I've ever been in.

This is why I don't do aerobatics. If I want to buy weird G forces with the objective of making myself ill I can do so vastly more cheaply at the fairground.
Gertrude the Wombat is offline  
Old 30th Apr 2019, 21:36
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Woking
Posts: 118
I used Kwells - seasickness tablets. After a while I didn't need them any more

B
bern444 is offline  
Old 1st May 2019, 01:06
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 24
A Wise Old Pilot once told me, "There are two kinds of pilots. The ones who have been sick and the ones who will get sick." I've never been sick, yet. But I do enjoy unusual attitude recovery under the hood during check sessions. Maybe one day that will do it.
Deadstick126 is offline  
Old 2nd May 2019, 06:24
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Geneva Switzerland
Age: 65
Posts: 257
I get car sick real quick ( Nausea due to motion sickness) if I am a passenger not on highways, but on any other scenario involving repetitive turns and continuous accelerations decelerations.
Likewise in an aircraft while maneuvering with sudden changes in pitch an /or roll

Had to adapt and be patient in flight by doing so I managed to do aerobatics for more than 30 years.

Here is what I found out:

Step into an aircraft making sure you are fully rested,

Consider short sessions, and fly regularly so the body gets accustomed. You may have to do it all over if you stop for some time.

Never fly on an empty stomach, or on a stomach with fluids only, avoid coffee it is conducive to nausea. Make sure you ingest solid food in reasonable quantities before flight.

Interrupt any sequence at the first signs of nausea, return to straight and level and head back to the airfield immediately; Open the air vents fully and look only outside. Being VFR you should be looking outside and only briefly peep at the instruments should need be to confirm any flight parameters.

Avoid maneuvering at the hottest hours on a summer day.

Don't get discouraged, if you take some precautions it will unfailingly work.
markkal is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.