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PPL online question bank

Old 11th Jan 2017, 11:30
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PPL online question bank

Hello,

I've recently started to self-learn PPL theory as my ground school will start on this spring. I want to be prepared and make learning process as fast and high quality as possible so that I can pass CAA exams at my best and get to flying.

It would be kind from you, ladies and gentleman, if you shared your experience and suggested me some good online PPL question banks. No matter free of charge or with democratic member fee.
I have access to regular question bank where all topics in one subject are mixed together. What I imagine is that I can test myself for each topic separately like magnetos only or carburettor only or prop only...
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Old 11th Jan 2017, 19:34
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For iPhones from the AppStore , PPL Tutor and Easa PPLex

Airquiz for pc, though I find the above apps are much better.
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Old 14th Jan 2017, 17:22
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Has anyone found that the airquiz website is significantly harder than PPL Tutor? Following my revision in the Pooley's books I get 100% every time in PPL Tutor but quite often scrape a pass with 75-90% on airquiz.

I've tried the tests in the AFE revision guides as well and get 100% first time on each of them...

Have my Air Law and Op Procedures exams tomorrow and starting to panic that I've learnt the wrong stuff! PPL Tutor and AFE seem much less in depth than airquiz.
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Old 14th Jan 2017, 17:26
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Don't worry, if you're good with PPL tutor you'll be fine
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Old 14th Jan 2017, 20:43
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I found airquiz significantly better than PPL Tutor.

Your correct, air-quiz's questions are worded to a more professional manner, but the syllabus is exactly the same.

With thanks to airquiz, I managed to pass all my PPL exams first time, and the exam questions felt a lot easier than I was already use to.
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Old 14th Jan 2017, 21:09
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Originally Posted by pilotjimbo
I found airquiz significantly better than PPL Tutor.

Your correct, air-quiz's questions are worded to a more professional manner, but the syllabus is exactly the same.

With thanks to airquiz, I managed to pass all my PPL exams first time, and the exam questions felt a lot easier than I was already use to.
I've actually found that there is quite a lot of content on airquiz which isn't covered either in PPL Tutor or in the Pooley's books (for example, the extent to which a pilot of a private aircraft can make his own repairs). Whether or not these things are part of the EASA syllabus I suppose I will discover tomorrow!

In my eyes the AFE revision guides and PPL Tutor are far more closely aligned in terms of content and question format, both cover slightly more ground than is covered in the Pooley's books and neither show any similarity to airquiz as far as I can tell.
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Old 15th Jan 2017, 11:11
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Alternatively (someone has to say this each time this topic is raised) you could just learn the subject, then you'll be able to answer questions on it.
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Old 15th Jan 2017, 11:44
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No Mr Wombat, I don't particularly agree with that....


Take 'engines' for example. You could research how they work and find out that the gasses are compressed adiabatically, and find the formulas for thermal efficiency (related to Tmax and Tmin). You could study Youngs Modulus, and use the Ultimate Tensile Strength calculations used in the design of Con-Rods.


Or in Navigation, you could delve into Astral Navigation, how to use a Sextant, and how to calculate the great circle bearing of one Lat/Lon position to another. (as I unfortunately did prior to my PPL.)


It's only by knowing what questions will be asked, that you don't research a subject in too much depth.
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Old 15th Jan 2017, 12:05
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It's only by knowing what questions will be asked, that you don't research a subject in too much depth.
The standard text books are a bit of a clue, actually.

Which is not to say that it isn't also helpful to do some extra reading as you suggest. I found this one very interesting: https://www.amazon.co.uk/DESIGN-AERO...+the+aeroplane
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Old 15th Jan 2017, 13:21
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I used to attempt the questions in the Bowland Forest Gliding Club Quiz. After doing it about 4 times, I only had to read they first few words of the question, to guess the result.... e.g. 'What does the Pressure....' = A

Bowland Forest Gliding Club : Bronze Confuser Quiz
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Old 15th Jan 2017, 17:06
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Seconded, Gertrude.
The purpose of the exams is to test your knowledge of the theoretical aspects of aviation, not to learn the entire databank's answers from a website, that is all but cheating by any other name. Oh, I know this may be "the way it's done" nowadays, but it doesn't make it the right way. It certainly isn't doing the candidate any favours at all by denying him the knowledge he ought to have but has circumvented.
PPL knowledge is pretty simple anyway, why bother?
As stated above, the text books cover the subjects to the depth required so suggestions of learning Young's Modulus and Astro are just very silly and unhelpful indeed.
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Old 16th Jan 2017, 09:01
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I think it is very important to understand the theory prior to sitting the exam. At least understand each of the topics covered. If you have a question you haven't seen before - without this knowledge, it may be difficult for you to answer the question.

I personally didn't get on with the AFE books (which I had purchased). I didn't like the style of writing, and did not appreciate their somewhat "large" format. I did however, enjoy Pooley's books which are the ones that I ended up using for my basic understanding (in addition to help from my instructors and other PPL students of course).

I then used an app available on both Android and Apple Store called "EASA PPL Exam" which at least at the time, had a tendency to have very similar questions to the ones I completed in my exam. Some were in fact identical to the ones I had seen in this app, whilst others were rather closely linked. This does give you a certain level of confidence prior to sitting the exams that you have learnt the right stuff and practiced similar questions to the ones you will have to face.

I would recommend AFTER having understood the topics read, and practiced the questions at the back of the book / end of each chapter which re-enforces the prior reading - to use an app with sample questions which are similar to the real ones is beneficial, and will guarantee your pass rates!

Hope this helps!
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Old 21st Jan 2017, 17:31
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Originally Posted by Gertrude the Wombat
Alternatively (someone has to say this each time this topic is raised) you could just learn the subject, then you'll be able to answer questions on it.
I agree whole heartedly with this. One thing I promised myself when I started studying for my PPL was that I would never learn a question bank.

To be clear, I interrogated every chapter of the Pooley's books before moving on to the next, and didn't use any testing software until I had finished reading.

Mock tests are invaluable in preparing for exams because otherwise, despite knowing the information, you can be completely surprised by the format of the questions. We see this from a very young age. Has anyone in the UK school system ever taken an exam without sitting a mock version?

My concern was that the airquiz site in particular covered information which was not covered, alluded to or referenced in the Pooleys books.

Whenever I get a question wrong on any of these sites I go back to the books and other sources of information until I understand my mistake. On a number of occasions I have spent hours poring over SERA and the ANO to get the understanding I need in the intricacies of some of these questions.

This in depth knowledge is not tested in the exam, nor is it particularly useful to a pilot practically.

In reality, the questions often focus on elements of the syllabus which are fundamental to safe aviation and therefore I think that a student would be foolish not to use one of these testing sites, so long as it is used correctly.
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Old 31st Jan 2017, 17:03
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I absolutely agree with all of the topics raised above. For someone who is currently suffering through the PPL syllabus I can see the merits of both arguments. I want to be the best pilot I can be, I want to see the end of my career as a pilot, but at the same time,the books can be rather dry and waffle on. Alot of the text is of nominal use as oppose to being educational fact. For me the question banks help you understand what you have and haven't learnt, and also learn in a helpful way. For instance, I know that I need 10km of vis for an SVFR into a Control Area, rather than perhaps knowing what I don't need. Does that make sense. In this day and age quite a lot of the material seems to be slightly irrelevant. For instance, I will never need to know when a royal flights airspace will become active, because I'm not the royal charter pilot.

In answer to your original question, airquiz seems perfect, and good luck to you!
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Old 31st Jan 2017, 17:35
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For instance, I know that I need 10km of vis for an SVFR into a Control Area, rather than perhaps knowing what I don't need.
2 errors in that statement; you need to find an up-to-date source of information!

SERA.5010 refers to Special VFR in control zones:

Special VFR flights may be authorised to operate within a control zone, subject to an ATC clearance. Except when permitted by the competent authority for helicopters in special cases such as medical flights, search and rescue operations and fire-fighting, the following additional conditions shall be applied:

(a) by the pilot:
(1) clear of cloud and with the surface in sight;
(2) the flight visibility is not less than 1500 m or, for helicopters, not less than 800 m;
(3) at speed of 140 kts IAS or less to give adequate opportunity to observe other traffic and any obstacles in time to avoid a collision; and
(b) by ATC:
(1) during day only, unless otherwise permitted by the competent authority;
(2) the ground visibility is not less than 1500 m or, for helicopters, not less than 800 m;
(3) the ceiling is not less than 180 m (600 ft).
There are no longer any additional, more restrictive limits for NPPL / LAPL holders or PPL holders without instrument qualifications.
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Old 31st Jan 2017, 19:30
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Originally Posted by BEagle
2 errors in that statement; you need to find an up-to-date source of information!

SERA.5010 refers to Special VFR in control zones:

Special VFR flights may be authorised to operate within a control zone, subject to an ATC clearance. Except when permitted by the competent authority for helicopters in special cases such as medical flights, search and rescue operations and fire-fighting, the following additional conditions shall be applied:

(a) by the pilot:
(1) clear of cloud and with the surface in sight;
(2) the flight visibility is not less than 1500 m or, for helicopters, not less than 800 m;
(3) at speed of 140 kts IAS or less to give adequate opportunity to observe other traffic and any obstacles in time to avoid a collision; and
(b) by ATC:
(1) during day only, unless otherwise permitted by the competent authority;
(2) the ground visibility is not less than 1500 m or, for helicopters, not less than 800 m;
(3) the ceiling is not less than 180 m (600 ft).
There are no longer any additional, more restrictive limits for NPPL / LAPL holders or PPL holders without instrument qualifications.
Really? My books and Airquiz show a 10k. Used the wrong word, zone or area sorry.
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Old 31st Jan 2017, 19:34
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As I wrote, you need to find an up-to-date source of information.

Which means one which has taken into account SERA, the ANO 2016 changes affecting UK PPL and NPPL holders as well as the changes which have been in place for JAR-FCL and Part-FCL PPLs for some years now....
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Old 31st Jan 2017, 23:34
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For instance, I will never need to know when a royal flights airspace will become active, because I'm not the royal charter pilot.
But you may wish to avoid a one-sided interview and suspension of your licence because you infringed the airspace without clearance. This, I suggest, would not assist you in your ambition to be 'the best pilot I can be'.
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Old 2nd Feb 2017, 08:53
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Originally Posted by BEagle
As I wrote, you need to find an up-to-date source of information.

Which means one which has taken into account SERA, the ANO 2016 changes affecting UK PPL and NPPL holders as well as the changes which have been in place for JAR-FCL and Part-FCL PPLs for some years now....
Double checked and now corrected my knowledge. Will have to message air quiz and explain their question is out of date. Thanks very much.
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Old 18th Jun 2017, 10:56
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Originally Posted by jamesgrainge
Double checked and now corrected my knowledge. Will have to message air quiz and explain their question is out of date. Thanks very much.
what you guys think about thise web site Pricing - PPL Cruiser
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