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Tricks of the trade for flying tailwheel?

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Tricks of the trade for flying tailwheel?

Old 16th Nov 2020, 11:40
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: these mist covered mountains are a home now for me.
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Think more about the wind. Always. Even when taxiing out or post flight.

Anticipation is also a great quality.
Runaway Gun is offline  
Old 16th Nov 2020, 16:01
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: 51.50N 1W (ish)
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Take up gliding first - that will teach you instinctive use of the rudder.

Well it worked for me, on taking up power flying to become a tug pilot too, went solo after 1 hour dual in a J-3 Cub.
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Old 16th Nov 2020, 20:36
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
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Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
Learn about the term "ground loop", some types are more forgiving than others. Do it in a Piper Cub and you will be embarrassed, do it in a Cessna 185 and you will likely damage the aircraft.
And don't do it at all in a Beech 18!
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Old 16th Nov 2020, 21:08
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 41
Originally Posted by KayPam View Post
I was told : in case of small bounce, pull the stick.
(In case of large bounce, go around, obviously)
Good. I look forward to hearing from Mach1Muppet on what his instructor advises him for the Decathlon - my guess is a little different than that which is probably what Capt Fathom was getting at.

Now that I have 10 posts - if Mach1Muppet and Bosi72 want to fill in more time there's an interesting video at
and lots of interesting stuff at https://www.dylanaviation.com/

Originally Posted by Bosi72 View Post
There is a local page with some regulations info about tailwheel endorsement.
Google Ozaeros tailwheel
Thanks Bosi72, much more than just regulations there.
David J Pilkington is offline  
Old 16th Nov 2020, 22:25
  #45 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 28
Thank you David
I am still below 10 posts so unable to send the proper link.
ozaeros.net.au/tailwheel/

Your page is certainly great asset covering both theory, practical and regulatory aspect not only for Tailwheel, but Aerobatics and Spins.
Not only locally in Australia, but Internationally recognised as well.

Cheers
Stjepan





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Old 17th Nov 2020, 01:05
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Kelowna Wine Country
Posts: 448
Don't worry too much about it, remember all pilots flew tail wheels at one time. When I was learning it wasn't even a thing. "We'll take this one today!"
If you think taxy-ing a tail wheel will be fun try taxying a short coupled seaplane without a water rudder!
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Old 19th Nov 2020, 06:37
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: England
Age: 62
Posts: 301
Mach1,

Think you've got more tips than a rackful of cues, enjoy your flying and let us know how it goes

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Old 19th Nov 2020, 07:40
  #48 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Victoria
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Originally Posted by Momoe View Post
Mach1,

Think you've got more tips than a rackful of cues, enjoy your flying and let us know how it goes
Yeah definitely, the information has been great! First lesson in the Decath was very interesting, it is indeed a different beast compared to a nose gear aeroplane! I think the biggest difference I have noticed is how much more complicated and smoother the touch and go sequence has to be. From touching on all 3 to stick aft straight away, and then nose up when powering up is indeed a very interesting prospect! Rudder control as well, dancing on the pedals is SO much more noticeable than what I would have thought, and I now understand just how unstable the aircraft can be! Bar the myriad of new techniques I have to learn, all I can say is the way of which a tail wheel is flown really does highlight the need for more stick and rudder flying than that of a tricycle. None the less, it is beautiful raw flying, and I cannot wait to have my next lesson!

Cheers,
Mach1
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Old 19th Nov 2020, 08:50
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: FNQ ... It's Permanent!
Posts: 3,717
Sounds like you were kept busy!
And while all this was going on, all you could hear was what your instructor was saying. You didnít remember a damn thing anyone on here told you!
But you may be able to use it later!
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Old 19th Nov 2020, 09:14
  #50 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Victoria
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Originally Posted by Capt Fathom View Post
Sounds like you were kept busy!
And while all this was going on, all you could hear was what your instructor was saying. You didnít remember a damn thing anyone on here told you!
But you may be able to use it later!
Definitely kept busy! , but seriously the information in this thread was actually of great benefit! getting an understanding of the reason why behind every action i took made life 100% easier, it made sure I didn't embarrass myself!

Cheers,

Mach 1
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Old 19th Nov 2020, 21:58
  #51 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Sydney
Posts: 364
Not so much about T/O and landing and getting an endorsement but TW types may have more noticeable adverse yaw in general flight compared to what most people are now used to.

(I figure because TWs tend to have powerful rudders to assist at low speeds with with take-off landing the designers figure, well the throttle jockeys have to know how to use their feet just to get airborne so let's save ourselves the bother about hiding adverse yaw, the pilot can look after that ).

The consequence in general flight of having noticeable adverse yaw and a nice powerful rudder is, yes you need to use rudder in turns to coordinate but you also need to be gentle and have good feel as it is easy to over do it. (I find initially people don't use rudder and it feels ugly until the light bulb goes off "oh! I need rudder!" and they start using big gobfulls of rudder and it feels ugly!)

I had one 777 captain tell me the hardest thing he found about tailwheels was doing a coordinated climbing turn to the left!
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Old 14th Dec 2020, 04:54
  #52 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Victoria
Posts: 46
A Quick update on what i learnt and what caught me out doing my tailwheel endo.

Gday all, Finished the TWU endorsement today (good idea not to need surgery in between is a good tip), and boy oh boy, what an absolute pleasure to fly an aeroplane with a tailwheel. Dancing on the rudders became oh so apparent when mucking about on the ground, and it can really bite you if you treat the aeroplane poorly. Wheelers..... good in some planes not too fun to start off with in the decathlon, just like you all said a wheeler is an art form in itself, i never truly realised how difficult it could be (thanks to Dave Pilkington for the 1700rpm trick worked an absolute treat!) once you get them right, they are the most satisfying flying you could imagine (in my opinion) finally flying the plane back to hangar like you all said was more true than i could have imagined, understanding tight turns, wind and all of that fun stuff made it a very interesting but satisfying time.

Finally, i want to say thanks to all of those who gave me advice, it was truly worth its weight in gold, i have come to understand there is so much more to learn with a conventional undercarriage, but for now i have my endorsement, so let the fun begin!

Last edited by Mach1Muppet; 14th Dec 2020 at 05:15.
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Old 14th Dec 2020, 05:43
  #53 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
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My first tailwheel endorsement was a Citabria. I wasn't even taught wheelers, just 3 point touchdowns. I subsequently also flew the Decathlon and Scout. I found the 3 pointers kept me out of trouble, although crosswinds were a bit challenging. Maybe it was a Bellanca thing?

When I was in PNG, it was pure magic watching the old hands wheel a Cessna 185 onto a short uphill strip! They made it look so easy.
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Old 14th Dec 2020, 06:24
  #54 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Australia
Posts: 884
M1M
You will be much better at handling any aircraft now you have a feel for use of controls.
Enjoy the flying, and get Dave Pilkington to give you an aerobatic endorsement.
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