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Building hours for that first job...

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Building hours for that first job...

Old 19th Apr 2010, 07:54
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Gold Coast
Age: 38
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Building hours for that first job...

Hi there,

First of all this isnít a thread asking for a job and I did not post this thread in the hope of getting a job offer from a forum user.

I completed my CPL + MECIR nearly 6 months ago and I have been getting through the ATPL exams once funds become available for me to book them. Iíve been keeping my eye out on the AFAP website and reading the Aviation section of the Australian Newspaper every Friday in the hope of trying to find a low hour job offer that I can apply for.

So far nothing is available for me. Only jobs requiring a minimum of 400 hours (I only have about 200). I havenít been bothered to apply for these jobs as quite simply, I do not meet the minimum requirements and I donít want to waste the operators time with looking over a resume that doesnít meet their minimum requirements. I bet they would get a lot of resumes that simply don't measure up.

I am writing to get some advice on how to secure that illusive first job. My pilot resume is nothing flash. I have a couple of questions for those in the know that might be able to assist me.

Should I spend a couple of grand and get some 182 / 206 time?
Spend money on a 172 to get my hours up?
Should I invest 14k in an instructor rating in the hope of getting an instructing job?
Should I approach private pilots at the airports (YBAF / YBCG) and ask if I can co-pilot to get a bit more experience and possibly log some time? Surely there would be a couple of aircraft owners out there that arenít looking to make a career out of flying.
Would it be a good idea to find people that do a few ferry flights?

Obviously the above is for aircraft that I can fly (<5600 kg MOTW, retract. & manual prop. pitch)

I had a read over the fellow forums member that went up north in the hope of finding a flying job. It was one of my plans but I was a little discouraged when nothing became available for him. Perhaps it was his own undoing in starting the thread while he was looking.

Sorry if this is a little long winded but I wouldnít mind some alternative thinking, ideas and suggestions that could assist in getting some hours up. It would really be a great help.

Thanks.
dotau is offline  
Old 19th Apr 2010, 09:43
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Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Zealand
Age: 33
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It was one of my plans but I was a little discouraged when nothing became available for him
Two out of the three people I know who went north for work found something. Not trying to offer any advice, but though it might cheer you up!
Aerozepplin is offline  
Old 19th Apr 2010, 10:04
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: The Shire
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Right now in Kunus there are about 25 Pilots out of work. Slingair have already hired for the season and Alligator will take on about 10 more by the end of the hiring.

That gives you a 40% chance of getting a job if you hang around.

They seem this year to favour guys with low time and NIL experience.

A couple of hours in a 200 series Cessna won't hurt you and make sure you have a NVFR. There are heaps of guys this year without it, only a ME-CIR and if that is not current you can't fly under the NVFR.

Realistically you have probably missed the up north boat this season, an Instructor rating will be your best bet if you want to work until next year. By then you will have to many hours for an entry level scenic job and no charter time to get on a multi engine aeroplane.

If you wait it out until next year you won't have any currency and that will bite you too.

Flying is a funny thing and the goal posts are always moving just when you think the ball is about to go in. Some guys get lucky, others slog it out for years and years.

Good Luck (and don't listen to those clowns in the flying schools about 'up north' half of them have no idea)
The Green Goblin is offline  
Old 19th Apr 2010, 10:42
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: The cloud
Posts: 409
glider towing - join a gliding club and be a tug pilot
parachute ops
firespotting - although wrong season
pest controllers up north fly around as do sparkies find some that fly - check the casa aircraft register for insurance companies or as above to apply to for private work.
station work see casa site as above
instructing
find who does the radio traffic reports and fly them

plenty of work which doesnt involve paying punters to build your skills to set yourself up for the first full-time job.

get an LR and drive the pickup bus for someone until a slot opens up...

if your hungry enough an opportunity will show itself
Xcel is offline  
Old 19th Apr 2010, 11:15
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Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Up North
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Xcel speaks wise, as do the other fellas here.

Mate i know how you feel, with 320 hours here i've spent 12 months looking for work. You need to get out and do your best to meet the chief pilots. an email will not cut it (i found this the hard way) Also be prepared to move, i'm planning on moving mid year if nothing surfaces.

Aviation is a funny mistress, you will get work, you just need to tough it out it'll make that first job all the more sweeter.

and what ever you do, do not give up, too many people throw away their dreams just because it got a little tough.
AussieNick is offline  
Old 19th Apr 2010, 13:47
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Join Date: Feb 2009
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I feel sorry for the blokes who have no one to grab all this information from (PPRuNe ) and end up at the flight school with the best website (sausage factory) and get shoved out on the street with licenses with no idea what to do next.

I'm lucky and have been told by many who have been there and done that and know it's going to be a hard slog, but flying is fun so I'm doing it anyway .

What ever you do make sure you HAVE FUN!!!
freshy1234 is offline  
Old 19th Apr 2010, 14:20
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Join Date: Mar 2005
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This in no way is having a go at you, but have you had a search of the older threads with the title "first job" in them on here?

When I was in your situation I did exactly that, read about others experiences and gained from their stories. There are some cracker ideas in them and that that led me to get my start.

As an aside, you are in Qld, even if you dont want to "head north" in the traditional sense- ie NT or WA, what about a drive up the coastal road of Qld, from my limited knowledge of the area there is PLENTY of aviation going on in that part of the world. Scenic flying, parachuting, charter. If all else fails at least you have had a pretty damn cool roadtrip.

Like others have said, good on you for getting on here and being pro-active, that already puts you ahead. But you still have to act on the idea's to grab a spot...
Chadzat is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 05:30
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kerikeri, New Zealand or Noosa Queensland. Depending on the time of year!
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If you want to find a job in aviation, and bearing in mind your current level of experience I would advise that you hit the road and knock on doors. If you present yourself well enough, sooner or later you will get the break that you are looking for.

Sitting at home and sending out applications and resumes is not going to work, as Chief Pilots receive them by the bag full, and I am talking from a CPs perspective.

The main thing is to keep trying. Good luck
Exaviator is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 09:36
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I would strongly advise that you go and buy some Heavy Single hours.

Cessna 200 series time is highly regarded by charter companies.

There are many flying schools along the east coast who can offer a heavy single endorsement and consequent consolidation of those hours with highly experienced instructors. (ie dual navigation exercises)

Once you have 5-20 hours of such experience, update your resume with a separate column of "Heavy Single hours".

You'll be a shoe-in
Compylot is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 09:50
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D-J
 
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There are many flying schools along the east coast who can offer a heavy single endorsement and consequent consolidation of those hours with highly experienced instructors. (ie dual navigation exercises)

Once you have 5-20 hours of such experience, update your resume with a separate column of "Heavy Single hours".
a heavy single endorsement????
does a c150 full fuel & 2 bums count?
D-J is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 09:56
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So do you have to suffix your callsign with 'Cessna 206 Heavy'? Geez, its just a dirty ole motor plane!

I would agree get an experienced pilot, not an instructor, perhaps someone who has or used to operate the type in the real world and after you are allowed to private hire the aircraft, take said pilot with you and I'm sure for a carton or two they will instill a great deal more practical commercial operating techniques than an experienced instructor could. Not having a go at instructors, just my two bobs worth.

Plus, the two cartons would be much less than the instructor hire, and you don't have to fight the experienced bloke about who is logging it as command....

j3
j3pipercub is online now  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 11:07
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Join Date: Oct 2009
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Hi j3pipercub, may I respectfully disagree with your comments regarding
an experienced pilot, not an instructor
.

May I say, that many instructors have experience and that 'said' instructors could even have substantial heavy single time?

Believe me, instructional experience on heavy singles is highly regarded when applying for an airline position

Eloquent elocution is certainly another attribute positively reviewed.

Certainly nothing wrong when flying a heavy single with prefixing your callsign with "Heavy" when inbound to a CTAF, as there are many light singles such as jabirus out there that struggle to do half the IAS of your typical heavy Cessna and appreciate the heads up!
Compylot is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 11:16
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Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Left of reality.
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Cool C206 Heavy?

Why spend more money.? Your already qualified to enjoy the heavy 206,s.
Depends on how deep your pockets are, but that job will NOT come to you.
I left Coloundra many years ago and had a list of EVERY piston single operator in Aus. That was my challenge and my dream. I would avoid instructing, as i truely believe that commercial charter flying and freight flying in the wet and dry will consolidate a firm grounding and you,ll come out the over side (in some cases spat out) but the experience will hold you in good stead and teach you more than ccts in a C152 heavy.?
Go to NT!. Forget KNX.
Now i,ll breath. Apologise for my rant, but i,m not flying 152 heavys anymore.
M
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 11:22
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Compylot- you have got to be kidding!!!!!! Read you AIP/Jepp for a definition of when to add 'Heavy' to your callsign. To the best of my knowledge there are no 'Heavy' piston aircraft as it is determined solely by weight. FWIW it is not at all difficult to fly a fully loaded 206/210 around the circuit at 80 kts if required to fit the traffic pattern (this is called Airmanship!).
clear to land is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 11:23
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D-J
 
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May I say, that many instructors have experience and that 'said' instructors could even have substantial heavy single time?

Believe me, instructional experience on heavy singles is highly regarded when applying for an airline position

Eloquent elocution is certainly another attribute positively reviewed.

Certainly nothing wrong when flying a heavy single with prefixing your callsign with "Heavy" when inbound to a CTAF, as there are many light singles such as jabirus out there that struggle to do half the IAS of your typical heavy Cessna and appreciate the heads up!
sweet jesus I hope that was a wind up.... but from some of your other posts.....
D-J is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 11:45
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Join Date: Oct 2003
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Ok Compy, nice fishing expedition, I needed a laugh.
j3pipercub is online now  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 12:11
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Australia
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Compylot good one.

Does that make a Cessna Caravan a Super Heavy?
ResumeOwnNav is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 12:14
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Join Date: Nov 2003
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Compylot

Believe me, instructional experience on heavy singles is highly regarded when applying for an airline position
GOLD!

a few more characters
Di_Vosh is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 13:38
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Does that mean that the C209 is a Super Heavy single?
Led Zep is offline  
Old 20th Apr 2010, 20:27
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Join Date: Jan 2007
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Certainly nothing wrong when flying a heavy single with prefixing your callsign with "Heavy" when inbound to a CTAF, as there are many light singles such as jabirus out there that struggle to do half the IAS of your typical heavy Cessna and appreciate the heads up!
Please confirm this is a wind-up. Or let me know where you fly, so I can listen in to some CTAF chatter - should be entertaining.
ZappBrannigan is offline  

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