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Building hours for that first job...

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Building hours for that first job...

Old 20th Apr 2010, 21:05
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Australia
Age: 36
Posts: 68
command time

Anytime in command is good. If I were you I would go and fly the 182 for a bit then go and hire a 210 for at least 3 - 5 hours (depending on budget) I am unaware of any operators up your way with 210's for hire.

OR ... this has been said before, if you really wanted to go and build up your hours try and find 2 friends who will be willing to cost share or even pay a little bit to help you out.
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Old 20th Apr 2010, 22:17
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Dark Side OF Moon Or SE Qld
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Eloquent elocution is certainly another attribute positively reviewed.
Bwahaha, you actually think that I conduct myself in this manner in the real world or when at an interview?

Zapp,

Look at the tools previous posts, you'll see a pattern

j3
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 05:21
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kerikeri, New Zealand or Noosa Queensland. Depending on the time of year!
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Since when did a C-206 produce Wake Turbulence? The term "Heavy" when communicating with ATC refers to aircraft with a Max Certified Take Off weight exceeding 250,000 lbs under FAA Certification.

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) classifies those aircraft as “Heavy” that have a certificated maximum takeoff weight of 300,000 lb. Also called a
"Heavy Jet".

This is strictly a heads up to the ATC controller of the need to apply wake turbulence separation standards.

Enter controlled airspace and identifying yourself as "Heavy" in a 206 will raise a few eyebrows at least and more likely result in being asked to telephone SATCO after landing for a little chat .......
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 05:50
  #24 (permalink)  
Man Bilong Balus long PNG
 
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Location: And once again, the fun and good times having come to an end for yet another year, back in the cold, cruel real world and continuing the seemingly never ending search for that bad bottle of Red
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You want a heavy single? Try the P47D Thunderbolt.
MTOW 8,800kg.

Please confirm this is a wind-up
I would hope so.
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 07:30
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Zealand
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A heavy single, such as a DC-10 with #1 and #3 out would be quite a bonus on a CV. Airlines want to know that you can handle emergencies.
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 08:37
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 12:46
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Gold Coast
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I hear on the grape-vine that Mr Dotau has been tucking away on faaaaar too much ice-cream, so the aircraft he flies may indeed be a heavy.


But seriously ..... keep plugging away at the Old Boy Network. You'll often get the best jobs that way.
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Old 24th Apr 2010, 04:14
  #28 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Gold Coast
Age: 38
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Hi,

Thanks for the replies, it does give me a few more things to consider and options that I haven’t even thought of which was my aim in starting the thread.

Currently I am considering some 200 series time – about 10 hours or so, probably about $2850 for that in a 206. I think it would be a good step in the right direction as I have noticed the majority of charter companies do have 206’s and 210’s in their fleet.

In terms of CIR and NGT VFR, I would just have to keep my CIR recency up to be able to fly at night. I would rather keep that up then pay for a VFR NGT rating.

I noticed that a few of the glider groups use the Piper Pawnee – tail wheel endorsement required. Possibly a good way of getting some hours up over the weekend but I would like to visit these places in person and ask a few questions before outlaying money for the endo.

Parachute ops – I know of a couple around SE Qld, both pilot positions seem well secure by their current crew. I have heard that ‘meat bombing’ hours aren’t as favorable as bush time by some charter companies. Don’t shoot me for saying that, I am just repeating what I have been told.

Ideally I would like to have a little more experiences before hitting the road and heading up north as I am certain that every other newly qualified pilot would have the exact same qualifications as me. I would like to have something on my resume that would stand out from the rest and perhaps make me a more favourable candidate for a low hour position.

I will keep working on it and saving some money up.

Thanks once again for the replies.
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Old 24th Apr 2010, 06:20
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: FNQ ... Still!
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In terms of CIR and NGT VFR, I would just have to keep my CIR recency up to be able to fly at night.
You have to keep your CIR current. It will be an expensive exercise to keep renewing it, if you are flying a single out in the bush!


Re NVFR + CIR, have a look at this thread.
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Old 24th Apr 2010, 07:20
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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In terms of CIR and NGT VFR, I would just have to keep my CIR recency up to be able to fly at night. I would rather keep that up then pay for a VFR NGT rating.
Good call....that's what I did when I headed North. You have a rating that allows you to fly at night so why pay for another rating. The $ you spend on the NVFR would probably pay for 2 renewals...and who knows....you will may have the opportunity to progress to multi IFR by then (wouldn't it suck missing out on a ME IFR opportunity because you didn't have a current rating).

Personally, I would not invest in too many 210/206 hours-waste of money. Get a couple under your belt so you can go into a check ride with confidence.

Good luck.
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Old 25th Apr 2010, 23:27
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: In the land of smog
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C172 Copilot...?

Should I approach private pilots at the airports (YBAF / YBCG) and ask if I can co-pilot to get a bit more experience and possibly log some time? Surely there would be a couple of aircraft owners out there that aren’t looking to make a career out of flying.
Would it be a good idea to find people that do a few ferry flights?
Isn't this reserved for two crew aerial devices engaged in commercial operations where the ops manual requires two crew?
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Old 26th Apr 2010, 05:04
  #32 (permalink)  
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I don't understand what you're getting at.
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Old 26th Apr 2010, 07:37
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
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I'd agree with the 206/210 time for simply the reason of confidence when you're asked to go for a fly. I only had 3 hours in a 206 when I headed off but at least I wasn't going in blind. This was also the first time I had ever been in a cessna so it helped from that regard too.

The road trip up the coast sounds like a good idea too. Never know what you'll find.

Network well and that may help your cause too, but some time in these newly classed heavy singles is a good idea.

(and to think I accepted a wake turbulence waiver all these years without knowing!)
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Old 26th Apr 2010, 13:33
  #34 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: In the land of smog
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I'm pretty sure you can't log copilot on anything other than a certified two crew aircraft, e.g. B737 except where an operations manual requires two pilots for a single pilot certified aircraft like a B200. For other operations e.g. C404 'two crew' there is the PIC and a safety pilot, but that is not a copilot.

Logging copilot on anything like a light single would be looked at suspiciously.

By all means, go for a ride with a more experienced pilot but don't put it in your logbook unless you are the PIC or are under instruction in a dual operation.
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Old 26th Apr 2010, 13:39
  #35 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
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I did encounter some wake turbulence doing steep turns today in an ultralight heavy single (p2008 Sierra)..It was my own.does that still count?
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Old 27th Apr 2010, 10:20
  #36 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
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TSIO540 - understood - I understand what you're saying.

Would anyone know a good contact around YBAF / YBCG that has a 206 and 210 for hire? Feel free to send a PM if you like.

Thanks
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Old 28th Apr 2010, 08:03
  #37 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
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Save the money, or perhaps get a few hours on a 206. Buy a ticket next September and come to Africa. Start in Maun, Botswana, if nothing, head to Dar es Salaam or Arusha in Tanzania.
Good jobs, good maintence, and logging around 750-900 hours a year. With progression into a Caravan after a year (and all the training/type ratings are paid for)
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Old 20th Jul 2010, 02:16
  #38 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
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dotau

It's nearly been three months since you last posted. How is everything coming along? Did you decide on some 200 series time?
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Old 20th Jul 2010, 10:32
  #39 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Maun, Botswana
Age: 32
Posts: 424
Only just noticed the reply to my above post.
Times change, although a lot of people turned up this season, 24 got hired, and they were all the ones that took the time to wait around. Of the ones that didn't get hired which was only a few, they all headed west to Namibia and got hired there as that was the start of the hiring season there.
You can't hope to get a job by just sitting around at home, and coming from a guy who left the country to build hours, I find it strange that you aren't of the opinion for others to get out there and give it a go.
And the money spent, in 3 months here in botswana, you will spend approximately $2-3000.
Cheaper than 3 months in Australia or NZ in my opinion. Or, you will gain perhaps 10hrs in a 172.
3 months in africa having one hell of a time and a experience of a lifetime, or 10hrs in a 172, plus another 10hrs that you would spend on the airfare getting here.

You choose.
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Old 20th Jul 2010, 12:29
  #40 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Brisbane
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liftboy262.
Sounds like an adventure indeed. Just out of curiosity, what did you have to do to convert your licence? Did you head over there with a bare Aus cpl? I'd be keen for a bit more info.
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