PPRuNe Forums

PPRuNe Forums (https://www.pprune.org/)
-   Military Aviation (https://www.pprune.org/military-aviation-57/)
-   -   OFFICER and AIRCREW 'CANDIDATES' PLEASE READ THIS THREAD FIRST! (https://www.pprune.org/military-aviation/405176-officer-aircrew-candidates-please-read-thread-first.html)

ElSupremo 12th Mar 2010 17:12

It's more of a 'I want to fly anything fast' so I'm not really bothered about which jet I fly. Although the thought of landing and taking off from aircraft carriers does excite me.

OneFifty 12th Mar 2010 21:41

Age Limit for RAF Pilot
 
One difinitave answer coming up:

You have to be under 26 by the FIRST DAY OF SERVICE. Therefore, you could be age 25 and 364 days on the first day of training. A day later, and you are too old.

OneFifty 12th Mar 2010 21:44

E_L

I hope you do realise that you won't actually get the choice of which aircraft type you'll fly. If the aptitude tests show that you are more suited to rotary, then that's where you'll be going.

Furygan66 12th Mar 2010 22:01

Is it graded on say, High score = FJ, medium score = rotary, low = bus driver?

or more on an individual basis, separated by different category strengths?
If so what strengths are better for each one, if anyone knows?

Pontius Navigator 12th Mar 2010 22:14


Originally Posted by Furygan66 (Post 5567926)
Is it graded on say, High score = FJ, medium score = rotary, low = bus driver?

or more on an individual basis, separated by different category strengths?
If so what strengths are better for each one, if anyone knows?

Furygan, low is graded agricultural, ie tractor driver.

See PM

Jamesandpie 13th Mar 2010 00:10

I was under the impression it does not matter what your aptitude score is, that's only relevent to get in as a pilot. After this is it no longer discussed or referred to.

Your streaming is dependent on your scoring you get at EFT and is done on a 6 point scale, whereby if you attain a 6 (and some who score 5), get streamed to Linton to continue the basic fast jet training (BFJT).

Aerouk 13th Mar 2010 01:26

ElSupremo,

I've decided to call the legal training quits after I finish my degree this year, I was offered a place on a post grad course starting in Sept. I've decided to go ahead and get the RN application started instead.

Having looked at the RN training information that AA provided along with the Navy News etc. I'm really looking forward to a long career flying in any aircraft they give me. I really don't care, as long as it's better than my current Piper 28!

Pontius Navigator 13th Mar 2010 07:54

James, that is true but what was really meant was aptitude all the way through as you say. You are streamed based on performance. Performance is largely based on aptitude and ability.

You mght have a natural ability to fly but may have no ability to absord the lessons.

airborne_artist 13th Mar 2010 12:59

Bear in mind that the needs of the Service will take priority despite EFT gradings. It's entirely possible that a high number of your EFT course will be hotshots - but if there are only X places for FJ you could still get streamed elsewhere despite having a high score.

Worth noting that the RN is really looking for an aptitude score of >129 for pilots, despite the pass score being 112. I'm pretty sure that no-one has got to BRNC on less than 118 in the past three years, and anything less than 125 probably won't do in most cases.

Aerouk 13th Mar 2010 14:07

AA,

Do you know what the maximum score someone can reach? What about Observer scores?

Furygan66 13th Mar 2010 14:19

I seem to remember seeing something that said 125 for pilot and 135 for observer.

airborne_artist 13th Mar 2010 14:28

Anything over 150 is looking pretty hot - 170 is do-able, but don't get hung up on pure scores - the ability to learn is also key, as is the ability to multi-task in the real world (control the aircraft, communicate and navigate). I think we lost four from EFT who could only do one thing at once.

neildo 13th Mar 2010 21:44

IIRC tests are out of 180, they are for pilot anyway. Lad on my board got 170 and got sent home after ex phase; so don't get hung up on these results it's your whole set of qualities they are after, not just ability to fly.

ElSupremo 14th Mar 2010 03:15

Kreuger flap, check your PM.

Aerouk 14th Mar 2010 19:22

Kreuger flap,

I'm in fourth year at the moment my parents didn't think it was a good idea for me to go straight into the military at 17 without getting a bit of an education so I went to University. It's been good fun, I've been able to study all over the world but looking forward to getting a career.

Aerouk 15th Mar 2010 02:46

I would be wasting my time taking it further, as I said previously I have no plans to join the legal industry and wouldn't join it even if I never got into the RN.

I haven't paid a penny for my degree, it's all picked up by the govt where I stay so it's be a great experience and something I'm glad I've done.

I was offered the chance to do a part time course in Sept doing a post grad cert which I may do while I go through the RN selection process.

OASC 15th Mar 2010 14:20

OASC Bulletin 5
 
During this submission we would like to briefly cover the medical process as conducted here at OASC.

The RAF Medical Board at the Officer and Aircrew Selection Centre takes place over day 2 and 3 of the selection process. Its aim is to ensure that candidates are fit for both initial officer training and a full career as aircrew (if applicable). To this end, a rigorous and in-depth medical is performed on each candidate.

The assessment starts in the afternoon of day two of the selection process with anthropometry. The anthrometric assessment is undertaken to make sure that the candidate is neither too large nor to small for the aircraft currently on the RAF inventory. Due to the fact that potential aircrew are not selected to type at this stage, generic anthropometry measurement standards are used. Also performed during the end of day two are the hearing and eye tests. The in-depth eye test assesses near and distant vision, astigmatism, visual field and cornea mapping, colour vision testing, intraocular pressure testing, eye muscle balance testing, slit lamp assessment and stereoscopic vision testing. If the candidate has taken Roaccutane, a treatment for acne, he will also be referred for night vision testing as Roaccutane can adversely affect this.

The morning of day three of the selection process starts with a fasting blood test which, among other things, assesses liver, kidney and thyroid function, fasting blood cholesterol and fasting blood sugar levels. The candidate will also have an electrocardiogram (ECG) heart tracing and a thorough physical examination. The last stage of the medical process is the Medical Review in which the President of the Medical Board goes through the candidate’s medical history and examination with him and reaches a decision regarding his fitness for commissioning and aircrew duties(as applicable). In addition to all of the above, the candidate is given a form for his GP to complete and return called the Medical Attendance Report (MAR).

There are 3 possible outcomes of the medical boarding process:

a. Fit pending ECG, blood and MAR results. The ECG traces go away to be reported on by a RAF consultant physician and the blood results take a couple of days to come back from the laboratory. A final decision regarding fitness is not made until these 3 elements are received.

b. Temporarily unfit. The most common reason for this outcome is the need for a specialist opinion or the need to lose some weight; the maximum BMI allowable is 28 and the maximum weight 94 Kg. BMI can be calculated using the following formula:

BMI = Weight (KGs) ÷ Height (metres) 2

c. Permanently unfit. This is usually due to a history of a medical condition that prevents any further progress through the selection process.

We have deliberately not included any of the medical standards in this bulletin. This is due to the fact that the details are meaningless unless they are measured using the correct medical equipment by appropriately trained technicians and that the results are interpreted by a qualified military physician. Further information regarding health and fitness can be found at: http://www.raf.mod.uk/careers/canijoin/health.cfm

Please note that, although OASC will endeavour to answer generic questions that arise, we will not be engaging or commenting on individual cases. In those cases, the individual is advised to contact their nearest AFCO who will be able to deal with any queries. All information published is for information only.

Information regarding a career in the RAF can be found at RAF Careers home - jobs, recruitment and career opportunities in the RAF - RAF Careers

OASC 19th Mar 2010 11:25

OASC Bulletin 6
 
During this bulletin, we would like to cover the Selection Fitness Testing procedure which took effect on 01 Apr 10.

The Selection Fitness Test

All candidates attending the OASC for selection after the 1 Apr 2010 will be required to undertake the Selection Fitness Test (SFT), which replaced the use of the Royal Air Force Fitness Test (RAFFT) for selection purposes. This change took place to enable all candidates to prepare thoroughly against known criteria.The SFT comprises a 1.5 mile run on a treadmill followed by an assessment of the maximum number of press-ups and sit-ups an individual can achieve in one minute of each exercise. Candidates who do not achieve the required standard will not be offered a place to enter training in the Royal Air Force. Therefore, it cannot be stressed enough how important it is to pass the SFT and it is strongly recommended that an individual ensures that they are capable of reaching the minimum required standards prior to attending OASC and to maintain their fitness pending entry to the Service.

Standards for Fitness Testing

The standards for all three elements of the SFT reflect what the 'average' person (by age and gender) should achieve. Amber represents the minimum level of fitness that will permit candidates entry into training. However, due to the intensity of the initial officer training course, experience has shown that even with an Amber level of fitness, cadets may still struggle with one or more aspects of the training; their lack of fitness will affect their performance in terms of physical robustness and mental stamina. Green represents the Service desired level of fitness at selection and for entry into training. Unfortunately, the site format will not allow us to submit a neat table so we have had to improvise below. PU = Press ups, SU = Sit ups

Male 1.5 Mile Run entry standard

Age...Run (PU SU) Run (PU SU)
17-29 11.11 (20 35) 10.12 (40 41)
30-34 11.36 (19 32) 10.32 (37 38)
35-39 12.00 (18 29) 10.55 (34 35)
40-44 12.26 (17 26) 11.11 (31 32)
45-49 12.54 (16 23) 11.40 (28 29)
50-54 13.27 (15 20) 12.04 (25 26)

Female 1.5 Mile Run entry standard

Age..Run (PU SU) Run (PU SU)
17-29 13.23 (10 32) 12.08 (20 38)
30-34 13.47 ( 9 29 ) 12.33 (19 35)
35-39 14.13 ( 8 26 ) 13.05 (18 32)
40-44 14.48 ( 7 23 ) 13.35 (16 29)
45-49 15.19 ( 6 20 ) 14.18 (14 26)
50-54 15.53 ( 5 17 ) 14.56 (12 23)

The 1.5 Mile Run in more detail

The 1.5 Mile run involves running on a treadmill at zero inclination in the shortest time possible. The candidate will control all settings on the running machine and will have been made aware of how distance and pace are displayed on the running machine during the brief. It will be the candidate's responsibility to adjust the pace of the machine in order to achieve the required standard. It is, therefore, incumbent on the candidate to push themselves to complete the test in the quickest time. The run will commence on a signal from the PTI who will offer verbal reminders of time elapsed, pace and target times.

Please note that, although OASC will endeavour to answer generic questions that arise, we will not be engaging or commenting on individual cases. In those cases, the individual is advised to contact their nearest AFCO who will be able to deal with any queries. All information published is for information only.

Information regarding a career in the RAF can be found at http://www.raf.mod.uk/careers

NDW 19th Mar 2010 23:23

A levels or Engineering diploma
 
Evening all,

I'm currently studying for my A levels, but I was looking at studying another course.
There's a Mechanical Engineering course which would involve studying aerospace systems, biomedicine, and other mechanics, but also Maths and Physics would be involved at A level grade.

Obviously it wouldn't be the same as A levels but would it qualify for a WSOp trade.

So what do you guys think? Would it be worth while.

An mechanical engineering course has always interested me so would it be worth it?

Thanks

Pontius Navigator 19th Mar 2010 23:55


Originally Posted by NDW (Post 5582526)
looking at studying . . . a Mechanical Engineering course . . . involving aerospace systems, biomedicine, and other mechanics

Interesting


but also Maths and Physics would be involved at A level grade.

Obviously it wouldn't be the same as A levels
It is or it isn't. What exactly does it give you?


would it qualify for a WSOp trade.
Simple really. What does WSOp require? What does your non-A-level course give? Which is more stringent?


So what do you guys think? Would it be worth while.
ask the professionals. Go to the AFCO. Say your are doing XYZ; will that meet the criteria for ABC?


mechanical engineering course has always interested me so would it be worth it?
So why do you want to be aircrew, possibly kicking troops in and out of the aircraft when a job as an engineer would get you oil on your hand? [hint - interview question]


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:14.


Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.