Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Military Aviation
Reload this Page >

V-force emergency communications?

Military Aviation A forum for the professionals who fly military hardware. Also for the backroom boys and girls who support the flying and maintain the equipment, and without whom nothing would ever leave the ground. All armies, navies and air forces of the world equally welcome here.

V-force emergency communications?

Old 27th Nov 2022, 11:17
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: West Sussex
Age: 81
Posts: 4,653
Received 11 Likes on 1 Post
I followed the hams as a mere onlooker in the 70s. My Peruvian born wife wanted to listen to something closer to home than BBC2 so I started to explore the arcane world of Short Wave. Having acquired a Yaesu FRG-7 communications receiver I scanned the broadcast bands on her behalf but soon found that there was a paucity of international stations broadcasting out of South America (most were inbound to there from the likes of Radio Moscow and the BBC). There was one though that could with luck be pulled in through the variable vicissitudes of the troposphere. It was HCJB, La Voz de Los Andes, based in Ecuador and powered by Hydro Electricity, so very much on trend. It was/is a missionary outlet but attracted a following by airing traditional native music, featuring flutes, drums, and stringed instruments (particularly the Harp). So, a very 'plunky' sound that survived the vagaries of propagation rather better than European classical music would have fared. One of their programmes was DX Party Line, that informed enthusiasts of the varying comings and goings of transmissions heard by correspondents around the world. So started an interest in everything SW; broadcast, ham, and utility bands alike. At certain times of day you could listen in to exchanges between Hams in the USA and USSR for example. The former concentrated in the State of Florida (retirees following the hobby), the latter very avuncular and offering "73s to you my friend" but remaining cagy as to exactly where he was. No doubt a KGB Colonel at least, for who else would be allowed such largesse given that this was during the Cold War (see, it isn't thread drift after all!)?

The point of all this waffle? Merely to illustrate the importance of HF at the time for broadcast listeners, hobbyists, and indeed the RAF. "Upavon, Upavon, this is RAFAIR 1234. How do you read, over? They didn't, as often as not. Changi Comcen had rows of airmen with headphones clamped to their ears vainly trying to pass/receive operational messages along the CENTO route. Gan, Bahrein, Cyprus, UK, all might have been on the far side of the moon for all the good it did. One day a USAF officer from a detachment covering the first orbiting Gemini missions appeared at the front door. Could he please set up his Comms Equipment on the building's flat roof, pointing to his attaché case? An airman was duly provided to humour him, and it was from that airman that the whole camp soon learnt what had happened. Out of the case comes a corkscrew aerial duly pointed to the sky, and a handset. He checks his watch and soon begins intoning, "Canaveral, Canaveral, this is Singapore, report my signal, over. Roger, loud and clear also. Out". He restows his gear and follows the airman downstairs again. We were witnessing things to come...
Chugalug2 is offline  
Old 27th Nov 2022, 12:10
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: uk
Posts: 162
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Trumpet trousers View Post
Mick the Morse at Finningley, early 1980's. Anyone else remember him? Civvy ex-RAF telegraphist (IIRC) who doubled as the self-appointed studes agony aunt!
The method of teaching was PRT (Pattern Recognition Technique) [again, IIRC!] I think the standard to achieve was 12wpm transmit, and 14wpm receive, but happy to be corrected. As an aside, does the P8 Poseidon have morse capability?
Certainly PRT was the method used at Cosford to teach morse to B/E telegs, a long time ago but IIRC 24wpm plain language was the standard.

PM
kaitakbowler is offline  
Old 27th Nov 2022, 13:19
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Over the hills and far away
Posts: 86
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Also Bob, who would psycho-analyse you if you missed a particular letter.
Radley is offline  
Old 27th Nov 2022, 14:16
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Ferrara
Posts: 5,473
Received 27 Likes on 15 Posts
IIRC the original method of alerting the Prime Minister of a Nuclear attack when he was outside London was to inform the gentlemen of the AA & RAC motorbike patrols who would flag him down when they saw him..............
Asturias56 is offline  
Old 27th Nov 2022, 15:39
  #45 (permalink)  
I don't own this space under my name. I should have leased it while I still could
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Lincolnshire
Age: 79
Posts: 16,775
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Asturias56 View Post
IIRC the original method of alerting the Prime Minister of a Nuclear attack when he was outside London was to inform the gentlemen of the AA & RAC motorbike patrols who would flag him down when they saw him..............
Which is why the AOC in C Bomber Command could scramble the force on his own initiative, a bit like the current letter of last resort.
Pontius Navigator is offline  
Old 27th Nov 2022, 17:46
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Ferrara
Posts: 5,473
Received 27 Likes on 15 Posts
I thought that came a bit later - originally it required a political sign-off I think - I shall dig in the garage and see what it says
Asturias56 is offline  
Old 27th Nov 2022, 22:30
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hants
Age: 79
Posts: 370
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Dave Aram was the AEO on the crew on which I was co-pilot. He lived in the next room to me in a Seco hut and he seemed to be doing w/t all night long! I can remember his c/s but won't promulgate it. I am pretty sure he exceeded 35wpm.

ACW
ACW418 is offline  
Old 28th Nov 2022, 08:38
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Berkshire
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
As an ex-Vulcan AEO, I can confirm that morse was, shall we say, the last means of contact, given the probable nature of the HF bandwidth, if the balloon went up. I am disappointed that you call this chap a ‘Walt’, I fear that you were not on his humour bandwidth, that was the preserve of aircrew.

On another note, there is a comment regarding using the HF kit to spoof the American CB community. I fear that I did exactly that on one boring transit from Goose to Offutt. It caused quite a stir as more and more of the American CB community, wanted to get a comms with this strange English chap in Devon (allegedly!), who’s CB radio had the benefit of that old anomaly, troposcatter, little did they ever know that we were just a few miles above them!!
Rod T is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.