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V-force emergency communications?

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V-force emergency communications?

Old 24th Nov 2022, 16:36
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Originally Posted by EXDAC View Post
There are quite few amateur radio operators who "rag chew" at over 40 wpm. I'm not one of them. CW contest speeds are typically in the range 25-30 wpm but some stations will run at closer to 40 wpm. It's all keyboard sending and keyboard copy.
Not all of it. Some of us still take copy the the hard way -- by ear

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Old 24th Nov 2022, 17:19
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My cw is a very sluggish work in progress.

Johnny Cash apparently could read 60wpm
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Old 24th Nov 2022, 18:09
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How were you taught Morse Code?

Here is an interesting article by a Amateur Radio enthusiast who does Code quick.

Morse Code at 140 WPM
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Old 24th Nov 2022, 18:30
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Originally Posted by ACW599 View Post
Not all of it. Some of us still take copy the the hard way -- by ear
You misunderstood me. Keyboard reception/copy is ear to brain to fingers to keyboard. Very different from using a decoder but those do have their uses. 73.
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Old 24th Nov 2022, 19:24
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Oh, I see. Actually I can still just about write down copy coming in at about 30-35 but not as easily these days. The older I get, the better I was
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Old 24th Nov 2022, 20:13
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Originally Posted by SASless View Post
How were you taught Morse Code?
60 years on I can still remember the sequence - PWFY,QLUB,DXRS,MJGZ,CHKVN and AOITE followed by 1-5 and 6-0 followed by the punctuation.
It must have been a very tedious task, On day one we had di dah dah dit (P) three times at about 20wpm but with longish pauses in between.and he then wrote a P on the blackboard.It took about ten weeks to learn the alphabet etc.
It was taught by Charlie Wilcox at Topcliffe and he'd taught Morse some 20 years earlier in the Tram Sheds at Blackpool to WOp/AGs
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Old 24th Nov 2022, 21:01
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Originally Posted by NRU74 View Post
Originally Posted by SASless View Post
How were you taught Morse Code?
60 years on I can still remember the sequence - PWFY,QLUB,DXRS,MJGZ,CHKVN and AOITE followed by 1-5 and 6-0 followed by the punctuation.
It must have been a very tedious task, On day one we had di dah dah dit (P) three times at about 20wpm but with longish pauses in between.and he then wrote a P on the blackboard.It took about ten weeks to learn the alphabet etc.
It was taught by Charlie Wilcox at Topcliffe and he'd taught Morse some 20 years earlier in the Tram Sheds at Blackpool to WOp/AGs
And learning words with the same syllables as the sound, ie q - God save the Queen, - - .- L = to hell with it .-.. f- fetch a fireman --.- h - Piccadilly .... d - Dad did it -.. w = you wank*er ,-- C - Charlie Charlie.-.-. 3- trinity car park ...-- 4- I'm a phuking four ....- etc. 18 WPM minimum pass, ended with about 22 WPM receiving and 27 WPM sending. Our instructor, joined as National Service and was still serving as a MAEop in 1982. He could send a lot faster on a semi-automatic key, which moved to the left gave dits and to the right gave dahs. Thank you MAEop D Murga****d!

Last edited by cynicalint; 24th Nov 2022 at 21:20.
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Old 25th Nov 2022, 01:27
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Interesting indeed. In the late 1970s I learnt Morse code listening to pre-recorded cassette tapes out on the tractor using headphones (it was a very noisy tractor). The tapes were produced by one of the NSW radio clubs. I used CW for quite a few years, and my speed came up to somewhere around 16+ WPM. Other modes were attractive, and so the key got pushed to the back of the desk. More recently I have taken to listening again, and find I can copy plain text at about 15wpm again - for a short time. I've discovered that my concentration lapses very quickly at my age, and I can't keep my mind focused on the task for more than about a minute or so.

There are a lot of amateurs out there who are still using CW - indeed I think the number has probably increased since the Morse test was no longer a requirement for gaining the qualification to operate on the HF bands. Some of them rattle away at some pretty impressive speeds. I know of a few who refused to have anything to do with Morse when it was mandatory, but went ahead and learnt it anyway once the requirement was dropped - and went on to use it on air - sometimes to the exclusion of other modes.

I once had a phone contact on 20 metres with someone (pax) who had been invited up to the front of a B-747 transiting across the northern part of central Australia at the time - he was using the A/C HF radio with the blessing of the captain. Very strange - even more so as I was using my amateur HF station on the tractor. As you can comprehend, it was quite a while ago. I also had a couple of very brief contacts on 2 metres from the tractor with Musa Manarov in the very early days of the MIR spacecraft.

Interesting things can happen in the hobby that is amateur radio.

Apologies for the digression ...
73
FOR (not my callsign)
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Old 25th Nov 2022, 03:39
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PN
Thanks. That would account for it. I didn't get to a squadron until '68.
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Old 25th Nov 2022, 11:17
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V- Force Morse

Our AEO Ted Webb could rattle it out at 30 wpm
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Old 25th Nov 2022, 14:35
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'"Best Beef Essence" and "Best Bent Wire" were the ones I remember for practise. 25 wpm my best but 30 years ago, accented letters were the worst to learn

Hutch
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Old 25th Nov 2022, 16:20
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There is a very nice APP called “Morse-It”.
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Old 25th Nov 2022, 18:46
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Originally Posted by Clyffe Pypard View Post
Our AEO Ted Webb could rattle it out at 30 wpm
I bought his Citröen DS19 - not the best purchase in my life !
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Old 25th Nov 2022, 22:34
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[QUOTE=cynicalint;11336746]
Originally Posted by NRU74 View Post

And learning words with the same syllables as the sound, ie q - God save the Queen, - - .- L = to hell with it .-.. f- fetch a fireman --.- h - Piccadilly .... d - Dad did it -.. w = you wank*er ,-- C - Charlie Charlie.-.-. 3- trinity car park ...-- 4- I'm a phuking four ....- etc. 18 WPM minimum pass, ended with about 22 WPM receiving and 27 WPM sending. Our instructor, joined as National Service and was still serving as a MAEop in 1982. He could send a lot faster on a semi-automatic key, which moved to the left gave dits and to the right gave dahs. Thank you MAEop D Murga****d!
I remember Mr M taking our newly warranted lead wet under instruction on how a master aircrewman should behave.
There was mention here a couple of years back that Mr Murgatroyd had moved on to a better place. RIP
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Old 26th Nov 2022, 09:57
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Back in the early 1950s, an RAF aircraft went missing and there was an appeal on the Home Service (Radio 4 today!) as it then was for radio amateurs to listen for it. I don't think anyone heard anything, but there was certainly a procedure in place where by 'if all else failed' they could call in an amateur band. A friend who is licenced ended hi RAF days in the driver's seat recounts how in a Varsity flying over Italy - presumably on his way to somewhere like Cyprus - in the early 1960s they had a power failure and he went down the back and fired up the T1154 and R1155 and called Speedbird control (BOAC in those days)in London to pass messages. Another amateur - long dead now - was an airborne 'WOP' in the mid to late 1940s and in a Dakota, flying in the Far East had the main tx fail. Using the low power Command tx he called on Morse and explained 'Main tx u/s'. Now a Command transmitters (SCR 274series) were a low power short range HF equipment and Morse transmission was every much an afterthought and they could not be keyed at any speed above about 12 words per minute. So Martin's message that 'Main tx u/s' should not have been copied as it was as 'Main tanks u/s' which triggered a major SAR operation. As one can imagine, when the Dak arrived at its destination and on time, the brown stuff flew around!.
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Old 26th Nov 2022, 10:33
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At BRNC in the 60s we did Morse by buzzer and lamp ... the latter standing around the Parade Ground perimeter with a lamp on the mast. ISTR we had to get to 8 wpm, but we were never taught any techniques ... we just had to sort ourselves out somehow!
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Old 26th Nov 2022, 10:43
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Originally Posted by radeng View Post
Back in the early 1950s, an RAF aircraft went missing and there was an appeal on the Home Service (Radio 4 today!) as it then was for radio amateurs to listen for it. I don't think anyone heard anything, but there was certainly a procedure in place where by 'if all else failed' they could call in an amateur band.
That's very interesting -- thank you. I wonder whether that was the origin of the original story?
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Old 26th Nov 2022, 16:14
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The main problems are

If they didn't think he had a licence they couldn't legally communicate with him
If they did it would be to criticise his morse, aerial and impure CW tone

As others have said, CB might be a better way to pass the last minutes before Armageddon (if stuck in an aircraft)
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Old 26th Nov 2022, 17:19
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Originally Posted by Jetstream67 View Post
If they didn't think he had a licence they couldn't legally communicate with him
Certainly not true in USA. FCC rules allow anyone to use any frequency to communicate in an emergency.
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Old 27th Nov 2022, 09:36
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How were you taught Morse Code?
Mick the Morse at Finningley, early 1980's. Anyone else remember him? Civvy ex-RAF telegraphist (IIRC) who doubled as the self-appointed studes agony aunt!
The method of teaching was PRT (Pattern Recognition Technique) [again, IIRC!] I think the standard to achieve was 12wpm transmit, and 14wpm receive, but happy to be corrected. As an aside, does the P8 Poseidon have morse capability?
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