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39 years

Old 24th May 2021, 11:04
  #41 (permalink)  

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And had the 72 Sqn Wessex gone..........
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Old 24th May 2021, 16:01
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by teeteringhead View Post
And had the 72 Sqn Wessex gone..........
They would have done an outstanding job!

About 20 suitably-equipped helicopters and a squadron of highly current SH pilots doing hundreds of hours a year in N Ireland, rather than aircraft dragged out of storage and crews recalled from ground tours etc. There again: I'm biased!
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Old 24th May 2021, 19:58
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Originally Posted by ShyTorque View Post
Had our Pumas been deployed to the FI, as was originally planned, things might have been rather chaotic with regard to which side they actually belonged to.
Boeing Vertol CH-47C Chinooks were operating on both sides during the conflict. Argentine Air Force had two Chinook operating until June 1st. Those were flown back to the continent and survive the war.
The Argentine Army operated another two CH-47C. One of them was destroyed by a BAE Sea Harrier FRS1 on June 21st. The remainder was not fully operational for the rest of the war. It was suffering engine problems, and it was taken by the British after the Argentine surrender.
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Old 24th May 2021, 20:10
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Originally Posted by cosmiccomet View Post
Boeing Vertol CH-47C Chinooks were operating on both sides during the conflict. Argentine Air Force had two Chinook operating until June 1st. Those were flown back to the continent and survive the war.
The Argentine Army operated another two CH-47C. One of them was destroyed by a BAE Sea Harrier FRS1 on June 21st. The remainder was not fully operational for the rest of the war. It was suffering engine problems, and it was taken by the British after the Argentine surrender.
21st May by a 1 Sqn GR Mk 3 close to Mt Kent. I been to the wreckage of it (couldn't find the Puma that was taken out in the same attack).
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Old 25th May 2021, 15:03
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by cosmiccomet View Post
Boeing Vertol CH-47C Chinooks were operating on both sides during the conflict. Argentine Air Force had two Chinook operating until June 1st. Those were flown back to the continent and survive the war.
The Argentine Army operated another two CH-47C. One of them was destroyed by a BAE Sea Harrier FRS1 on June 21st. The remainder was not fully operational for the rest of the war. It was suffering engine problems, and it was taken by the British after the Argentine surrender.
Can anyone comment on the doors on RAF CH-47 "BN"? I seem to recall BN touching a river or stream and jettisoned her pilot and co-pilot doors. Were the doors liberated from one of the Argentine CH-47 for Bravo Novembers continued sterling service down south? Am I miss-remembering?
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Old 25th May 2021, 16:17
  #46 (permalink)  
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Yup. Dick Langworthy flying on PGNs at low level on the night of 30th May; entered a snow-storm and hit a lake. Spray entered both engines as they bounced, causing loss of rpm. Crewman was preparing to jump out of the back and the co jettisoned his door in anticipation of a watery crash-landing but the engines recovered and they climbed away with Dick encouraging the crewman not to jump!

Co-pilot's door was robbed from the argentine CH47 found abandoned on the racecourse outside Stanley. BN went on to live a long and fruitful life.

Mog
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Old 25th May 2021, 17:20
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You are an absolute font of knowledge, Mog, have you ever thought of writing a book...?!
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Old 25th May 2021, 20:00
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Door was later recovered when it washed ashore. Ahhh apart of life now so long ago.

some other folks pics that might not have been seen

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/...s-info-needed/

Last edited by NutLoose; 25th May 2021 at 23:21.
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Old 25th May 2021, 20:11
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He already wrote a book. I had the chance to read it. It is a very good book indeed.

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Old 25th May 2021, 20:48
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BN Doors

Thank you for bringing this topic up. I can remember that only BN's port door was missing when I arrived at Port San Carlos and it flew several sorties before a replacement was found, I had forgotten where it came from but suspected it was from an Argie Chinook. BN also flew with a missing ramp tongue but the reason for that is lost in the mists of time.

Another big piece of liberated Chinook kit was a brand new APU, still unopened in it's Boeing/Vertol packing crate and with all necessary paperwork. It was found in one of the sheep station manager's out-buildings at Port San Carlos and claimed by the 18 Sqn detachment.
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Old 25th May 2021, 21:32
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He already wrote a book. I had the chance to read it. It is a very good book indeed.
You’ve obviously never heard of irony...
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Old 25th May 2021, 23:12
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Originally Posted by Ken Scott View Post
You’ve obviously never heard of irony...
Nop, I just answered your question...
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Old 25th May 2021, 23:33
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Originally Posted by polecat2 View Post
Thank you for bringing this topic up. I can remember that only BN's port door was missing when I arrived at Port San Carlos and it flew several sorties before a replacement was found, I had forgotten where it came from but suspected it was from an Argie Chinook. BN also flew with a missing ramp tongue but the reason for that is lost in the mists of time.

Another big piece of liberated Chinook kit was a brand new APU, still unopened in it's Boeing/Vertol packing crate and with all necessary paperwork. It was found in one of the sheep station manager's out-buildings at Port San Carlos and claimed by the 18 Sqn detachment.
A lot of stuff was claimed as for the model mentioned as a CH 47C on both sides, the RAF version was a bit of a mongrel being more a C/D model. Happy days.
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Old 26th May 2021, 14:40
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Originally Posted by Mogwi View Post
Yup. Dick Langworthy flying on PGNs at low level on the night of 30th May; entered a snow-storm and hit a lake. Spray entered both engines as they bounced, causing loss of rpm. Crewman was preparing to jump out of the back and the co jettisoned his door in anticipation of a watery crash-landing but the engines recovered and they climbed away with Dick encouraging the crewman not to jump!

Co-pilot's door was robbed from the argentine CH47 found abandoned on the racecourse outside Stanley. BN went on to live a long and fruitful life.

Mog
Great stuff Mogwi, Thank you for taking the the time. One more if I may? While much has been touted about the AIM-9L "Lima" performance, what are your thoughts on how things would have gone with earlier versions of the Sidewinder on the Sea Harriers? It seems many of the engagements were from the rear hemisphere. Think you would have gotten a tone with the "old" AIM-9?
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Old 27th May 2021, 08:03
  #55 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by sandiego89 View Post
Great stuff Mogwi, Thank you for taking the the time. One more if I may? While much has been touted about the AIM-9L "Lima" performance, what are your thoughts on how things would have gone with earlier versions of the Sidewinder on the Sea Harriers? It seems many of the engagements were from the rear hemisphere. Think you would have gotten a tone with the "old" AIM-9?
Yes, a good question. Almost all of the kills were from the stern sector and could have been valid shots with the AIM9G. There were, of course major improvements in homing head, warhead and fusing in the L, as well as manoeuvrability, which may have been a factor - but most would have been valid G shots.

My first shot was fired below 50' and may or may not have worked with a G but the second, although fired in the stern sector, impacted at at more like 90 degrees. I have not seen any analysis of whether a G fusing would have handled this but maybe Gum can help.

There was obviously a psychological factor as well, as the opposition knew we were fielding the L, with its well deserved, awesome reputation.

Mog
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Old 27th May 2021, 23:11
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Mog, did you have SEAM in your jets?
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Old 28th May 2021, 07:05
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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39 years ago today, I led a 3-ship Harrier GR3 attack against AAA that was being used in direct fire against the 2 Para attack on Goose Green.

The attack using CBU's and 2" rockets was successful and put the guns out of action. I am told that it helped to de-moralise the Argentinians, and bolstered the morale of the attacking Paras. So it helped.

We were held at cockpit readiness on the deck of HERMES at first light the next day to go to do a "firepower demo" in the same area if the Argentinians didn't surrender - they did, so I went elsewhere.

Given the importance of that first major battle after the landings, the successful surrender at Goose Green set the scene for the next few weeks and the final surrender.
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Old 28th May 2021, 07:59
  #58 (permalink)  
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According to a Para I spoke to who was pinned down by the 35mm AAA on Darwin Hill, this attack by ExFJ was the one thing which allowed them to restart their advance towards Goose Green and undoubtedly saved a great many British lives.

Possibly the most significant Harrier attack of the conflict and was very largely responsible for the successful outcome of the first major land battle. BZ to No1(F) and 2 Para.

Mog
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Old 30th May 2021, 12:10
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Originally Posted by cosmiccomet View Post
He already wrote a book. I had the chance to read it. It is a very good book indeed.
A great read, I have just finished another superb book, Harrier 809 by Roland White, available on Amazon for a fiver !

I have always held the Falklands Harrier pilots in the highest regard ( flying a single engine jet in hostile skies off a carrier in the South Atlantic, often in crap weather with no divs ) but reading in this book that they sometimes got airborne with not much more fuel, 2,400 pounds, than we had in Jet Provosts, raised my regard yet higher !

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Old 6th Jun 2021, 10:00
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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XX377 Gazelle AH1 656 Sqn AAC

Volans et videns
39 years on - lest we forget

c. 060357Z Jun 82 Gazelle AH1 XX377 was destroyed with the loss of all onboard by a Sea Dart which had been fired from HMS Cardiff under the assumption friendlies would be using IFF. ROE permitted engagement 'without the constraint of visual identification if this was precluded by cloud or light conditions'

Crew
Staff Sergeant Christopher Griffin
Lance Corporal Simon Cockton

Passengers
Major Michael Forge R Sigs (OC 205 Signal Squadron)
Staff Sergeant John Baker R Sigs

Causes
  • Poor Communication between Services
  • IFF turned off because Rapier was not being able to cope with IFF emissions
  • Assumption

I have no personal connection with the incident but have always thought Blue on Blue fatalities are the hardest for families to cope with.

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