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Covid on Trident Patrol Submarine

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Covid on Trident Patrol Submarine

Old 14th Feb 2021, 07:56
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Covid on Trident Patrol Submarine


https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/new...-hms-vigilant/

Coronavirus outbreak on Royal Navy nuclear submarine based at Faslane sparks ‘patrol from hell’

Sailors on a nuclear sub have come through the patrol from hell after a Covid outbreak at sea.

Dozens on board HMS Vigilant reported sick but, with no access to a test lab, the precise number is not known. They had little chance to escape the bug while working in hot and cramped conditions.

A source said: “Imagine being cooped up underwater and breathing the same air when a killer virus is on the loose. It really was the patrol from hell.”

HMS Vigilant was on patrol as part of the Navy’s continuous at-sea deterrent. The £3billion sub was the designated “bomber boat” and armed with Trident nukes.

The source added: “The sickest sailors were put in isolation but it is not easy on a submarine. People sleep in bunks in tiny six-man cabins. They work on top of each other.”

Crew were on alert after one female sailor showing Covid symptoms was taken off the sub the day it set sail. One officer said: “It was a calculated risk to sail.”

The MoD said: “There has been no disruption to patrols since they commenced in 1969.”
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 08:02
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Given the fact that most of the crew would be under 50 and in good health compared to the rest of the population the chances of someone getting a real bad case is in fact very very small................
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 08:19
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Surely they must go into an isolation bubble for a couple of weeks before they sail?
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 09:11
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Daft to not have ability to test or quarantine affected crew. I've had the "commie cough" and although not a big deal it wasn't pleasant... great time for China to attack, when all RN sailors are struggling with symptoms so that they can't accurately fire back...
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 09:25
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Originally Posted by Booglebox View Post
Daft to not have ability to test or quarantine affected crew. I've had the "commie cough" and although not a big deal it wasn't pleasant... great time for China to attack, when all RN sailors are struggling with symptoms so that they can't accurately fire back...
This is satire right?
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 09:27
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Originally Posted by Asturias56 View Post
Given the fact that most of the crew would be under 50 and in good health compared to the rest of the population the chances of someone getting a real bad case is in fact very very small................
Except confined in a Sub would mean higher chance of high viral load, and thus greater chance of those younger healthier people getting a bad case, as we've seen this past few months compared to last Spring. My ex-missus is on the front line of the NHS, and she said they have seen higher numbers of otherwise fit 25-40 year olds in ICU this winter than last spring, largely as a result of higher viral loads from extended exposure with infected people in higher density households during winter time, especially with the newer more transmissible mutations.
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 11:57
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I agree that the risk was negligible. We are seeing 'younger' patients but I am not seeing 25-40 year olds that would pass muster to go to sea

What is of more concern is that they got in this situation. The US military have published a number of situations where they successfully managed outbreaks, and they do now have protocols to ensure this doesnt happen. May be the key words are 'completed a deterrent patrol' ie this is more than 10 months old.....
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 15:09
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Originally Posted by homonculus View Post
I agree that the risk was negligible. We are seeing 'younger' patients but I am not seeing 25-40 year olds that would pass muster to go to sea

What is of more concern is that they got in this situation. The US military have published a number of situations where they successfully managed outbreaks, and they do now have protocols to ensure this doesnt happen. May be the key words are 'completed a deterrent patrol' ie this is more than 10 months old.....
That would be concerning, but since last March SSBN crews have self isolated prior to patrol. Precautions are also taken to protect other crews - such as those mentioned here.
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 15:20
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“They had little chance to escape the bug while working in hot and cramped conditions.”

This was a Vanguard-class submarine, not a Type VII U-boat. A large, modern submarine such as the Vigilant is neither cramped nor hot. Unless working in the propulsion spaces, a crew member is likely to be wearing a sweater or coat.

As for the claim of higher viral load risk, the opposite might be true. A modern submarine has a robust, high-filtration ventilation system that would rapidly dilute any airborne virus.

“It was a calculated risk.” And the risk was very low.
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 16:50
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Originally Posted by BFSGrad View Post
“They had little chance to escape the bug while working in hot and cramped conditions.”

This was a Vanguard-class submarine, not a Type VII U-boat. A large, modern submarine such as the Vigilant is neither cramped nor hot. Unless working in the propulsion spaces, a crew member is likely to be wearing a sweater or coat.

As for the claim of higher viral load risk, the opposite might be true. A modern submarine has a robust, high-filtration ventilation system that would rapidly dilute any airborne virus.

“It was a calculated risk.” And the risk was very low.
I used to work on Vigilant for a good few years. Space wise its not cramped for a submarine but by normal standards it would be for sure. I used to hot bunk for my first couple of patrols (share a bed with an opposite number) just to give some perspective and there's obviously no social distancing. You wont be wearing a coat or a jumper, usually just a t shirt on patrol. As for the ventilation its very good but its recycled through charcoal filters so not sure if that would stop it. Generally the crew trains a lot as well which crash stops ventilation and stops air moving which makes things get very hot and humid very quickly. I can see how it could become a nightmare pretty quickly to be honest.
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 18:57
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Remember the USN had outbreaks on their carriers.

Just because there is isolation does not mean there are no rule breakers.
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Old 14th Feb 2021, 22:46
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Originally Posted by ORAC View Post
https://twitter.com/andynetherwood/s...093598721?s=21

The MoD said: “There has been no disruption to patrols since they commenced in 1969.”
Great care is taken of the health of submarine crews and, for example, flu jabs have been compulsory for Royal Navy SSBN crews have been compulsory since the outset whilst, in the presumed timescale, Covid vaccinations would not yet have been available. I also recall an SSBN Commanding Officer being replaced by the Spare Crew Commanding Officer at two hours' noticed prior to sailing on a deterrent patrol because the former was found to have developed mumps.

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Old 15th Feb 2021, 02:05
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I don’t understand why the whole crew was not isolated for 2 weeks prior to the scheduled sailing. That is what both the RCN and
the USN are doing,
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