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Any military aircraft still using braking parachutes ?

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Any military aircraft still using braking parachutes ?

Old 5th Aug 2019, 05:03
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Any military aircraft still using braking parachutes ?

Used to see this a lot on older, mostly fighter types, are there any still using them ?
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 05:43
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Norwegian F-16's and F-35's plus many Ruskie types....
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 06:51
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Eurofighter
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 10:15
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 10:22
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Hawk T2 has a brake-chute
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 11:11
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Originally Posted by TBM-Legend View Post
Norwegian F-16's and F-35's plus many Ruskie types....
is the F-35 regularly using the chute? Any pics?

I understand that it was a requirement for operating on icy runways but is it routinely used?
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 11:25
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MiG-29 and Su-27 have at RIAT over the last few years.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 11:31
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Originally Posted by atakacs View Post

is the F-35 regularly using the chute? Any pics?

I understand that it was a requirement for operating on icy runways but is it routinely used?
I don't believe it is used regularly. It requires an add-on pod/fairing above the nozzle.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 11:34
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Turkeys F-16s are also equipped with 'chutes. Solo Turk uses one at the end of their displays.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 13:08
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I believe the Norwegians asked for brake-chute capability. Image of pod being tested on US-marked F-35.


To add to the list of Mil aircraft still in service that have brake chutes:
B-52
F-4
Jaguar
The new Chinese stealth fighter ( I forget the name - Pingu or something ;-) )

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Old 5th Aug 2019, 13:12
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I believe some nations like the Norwegians, use the 'chute as much to assist with staying in a straight line on icy runways as for braking.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 13:32
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B1 I think?
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 13:48
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Exclamation Weather cocking

Correct me if I'm wrong but surely the last thing you want connected to your "Aeroplane" when landing on a snowy or icy runway is a dirty great parachute, unless of course you can guarantee a straight down the runway wind. I should imagine if you were landing with say, a wind 20 or 30 off and at around 15 gusting lots , it doesn't matter where YOU want the Aeroplane to go, the brake chute is going to dictate that particular matter. I have watched, when acting as recovery (an airman in a landrover near the overshoot end who collects or recovers the brake chutes from aircraft who have streamed the brake chute. I used to hate the arrival of a Victor!) the shenanigans of Lightenings (English Electric sort) and Jaguars streaming in gusting conditions, great fun but I kept the vehicle engine running and in gear.Of course I do stand to be corrected by those in the know quoting various instructions on when you can and can't stream but hey, the wind never read those, or the forecast.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 14:07
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Last edited by sandiego89; 5th Aug 2019 at 14:23.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 14:25
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Originally Posted by Octane View Post
B1 I think?
No...

-RP
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 14:38
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I should imagine if you were landing with say, a wind 20 or 30 off and at around 15 gusting lots , it doesn't matter where YOU want the Aeroplane to go, the brake chute is going to dictate that particular matter.
ACW342,

From my experience, the gist of what you say is true, even on runways with standing water....but that example is really a minimal crosswind. The steady crosswind in that example is only 7.5 knots which is usually easily handled by, say for example, an F-4 with that wide main gear on snow. As rudder effectiveness diminishes, nosewheel steering may allow for better directional control (ice is problematical for that).

The x-wind limits for the jets I'm familiar with were predicated on the chute being deployed, higher crosswinds and you had the option of not using the chute if runway length permitted (the NATO minimum 8000' most times did, but there was always the tailhook and departure end cable.)

Generally the width of the main gear contributed to the x-wind limit.

In the old F-100, the requirement was to put the nosewheel down and engage nosewheel steering prior to deploying the chute, even on a dry runway, and then in extreme cases be ready to jettison the chute and put the hook down.

(Except for the Air Defense guys, if the runway wasn't plowed, you could always cancel flying and have a beer)
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 16:20
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(an airman in a landrover near the overshoot end who collects or recovers the brake chutes from aircraft who have streamed the brake chute. I used to hate the arrival of a Victor!)
Not surprised, as the Victor brake parachute was a hefty load to handle. As aircrew we had to change our own on occasion when landing away from base. This involved all five of us climbing up a giraffe and then shoving the thing into its hopper (our portly AEO was usually given the job of jumping up down on it to persuade it to go in!)
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 17:03
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TTN.... only 5 of you?

As a young SAC dispersed on Ex 'Micky Finn' out of Waddo, I can recall many occasions when I was required to either fit a new Vulcan chute or do an OOP life ex change, on my own. (The Vulcan chute weighed about the same as the Victor one)

One wet and windy night on HMS Goldcrest I had two changes to do. I did the first one before going across to the mess deck for scran. The matelots were very helpful and 'spliced the main brace' for us as the weather was so bad. It would have been churlish to turn down their offer so I had a couple ......so as not to offend the senior service.

On return to the flight line, I changed the second chute on a particularly arsey jet where the dodgy door microswitch made life a bit more difficult. Finally I got the hook closed and the door down and locked. Thankfully, I took the closure tool off and stood back to admire my work....

Now, Those safety raisers were not very wide (or safe) and I was very grateful that I had thrown the old chute off onto the deck when I fell onto it. The scoops of rum from jolly jack and his shipmates helped make it a relatively painless process anyway.

5 of you? For goodness sake! Man up.

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Old 5th Aug 2019, 18:00
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Originally Posted by ACW342 View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong but surely the last thing you want connected to your "Aeroplane" when landing on a snowy or icy runway is a dirty great parachute, unless of course you can guarantee a straight down the runway wind. I should imagine if you were landing with say, a wind 20 or 30 off and at around 15 gusting lots , it doesn't matter where YOU want the Aeroplane to go, the brake chute is going to dictate that particular matter. I have watched, when acting as recovery (an airman in a landrover near the overshoot end who collects or recovers the brake chutes from aircraft who have streamed the brake chute. I used to hate the arrival of a Victor!) the shenanigans of Lightenings (English Electric sort) and Jaguars streaming in gusting conditions, great fun but I kept the vehicle engine running and in gear.Of course I do stand to be corrected by those in the know quoting various instructions on when you can and can't stream but hey, the wind never read those, or the forecast.
Saw my first ever real Mirage pirouetting down Laarbruch's runway wrapping itself in silk....
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 18:05
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Su-27

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