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Approval to Wear Pilot's Brevet

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Approval to Wear Pilot's Brevet

Old 19th Apr 2019, 22:26
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Approval to Wear Pilot's Brevet

While going through some of my late fatherís papers I came across the confirmation he received that he could wear his pilotís brevet. Granted that things were probably pretty hurried in 1918, but how have people since then been notified that they can wear the relevant brevet? Iíd somehow imagined it might be a bit more formal than that.


No. 1 School of Navigation and Bomb Dropping, by the way, was alongside Stonehenge, and he flew DH 9As, luckily too late to see combat.

Last edited by Buster11; 19th Apr 2019 at 22:57. Reason: Image blurred
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Old 19th Apr 2019, 22:54
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Being a bit pedantic - the brevet is the authorisation for him to wear his wings which are called a "Flying Badge". The certificate or brevet is what allows him to be a pilot and is his authority to fly. Its much like the commissioning scroll and is the formal paperwork that you have finished training in the role.
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 00:39
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I see that in the front of my log book there is a hand-written entry which says "This is to certify that Flying Officer Tankertrashnav has qualified as a Navigator, with effect from 11 Mar 70". Signed by the OC Training Wing of 1 ANS, which by this time had moved to Stradishall (and we didnt do any bomb dropping!)

No mention of the flying badge or brevet, and as far as I can remember, no separate piece of paper, or certificate.
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 06:24
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I got a small certificate in 1987 which stated I had qualified as a pilot and was entitled to wear the flying badge.
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 07:42
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I notice that in September 1917 Army ranks were still used: when were RAF ranks adopted?
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 07:42
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1966. A handwritten copperplate page in the logbook. "Certified that Plt Off Bloggs has successfully completed the course in accordance with the current authorised syllabus and that he is awarded the flying badge in accordance with Queen's Regulations for the Royal Air Force with effect from 13 May 1966."

Signed Commanding Officer, Flying Wing No. 2 FTS Royal Air Force Syerston.
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 08:23
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I have a certificate in my first logbook which states: 'This is to CERTIFY that in accordance with QR and ACI paragraph J727 Flying Officer (BEagle) is qualified to wear the Royal Air Force Flying Badge with effect from 16 Aug 74'. It was signed by the CFI of the RAF College.

By which time I had 265:15 total time, of which 92:15 were as PIC - but that included 137:40 on the Chipmunk, 55:00 as PIC. Plus the 45 hrs or so from my Special Flying Award and some PPL time, but that was logged in a civil logbook.

Whereas today....???
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 09:11
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The 6 FTS version:




(Apologies for size)
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 09:31
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Originally Posted by J1N View Post
I notice that in September 1917 Army ranks were still used: when were RAF ranks adopted?
A small clue ... the Royal Air Force was formed on 1 April 1918.

However, it was not until 1 August 1919 that the current system came into force.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_officer_ranks
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 10:33
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BEagle, you were one of the EXPERIENCED pilots. My total at wings was 165:50, 59:35 of which was PIC. All on JP 3/4.
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 11:02
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23rd March 1962.

Certified that Fareastdriver has successfully completed the course in accordance with the current authorised syllybus, except for the following exercises:- NIL- and that he is awarded the flying badge in accordance with QR & ACI para 815 with effect from 23rd March, 1962.

Signed J Manning AFC Wg Cdr.

Commanding Flying Wing
No5 FTS Royal Air Force
OAKINGTON

That was after 129 hrs on the Provost T1 at 6 FTS and 137 hrs on the Vampire T11. We had to write our own certificates in our log books and send them off to OC Flying for signature.

Technically I should not have been awarded my wings because I spelt syllabus wrong.


(only found that out today because of spellcheck) .
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 13:07
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Beagle, are you suggesting that today's students are faster learners?
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 14:40
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"I know nothing".....as Fl. Schultz might have said!
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 18:03
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BEagle At last you have admitted what we always knew!!

As a Directional Consultant, who was always chauffeur driven to work, I was not the recipient of the Double Wing Master Race flying badge.

My logbook says.

This is to certify that Plt Off TT
has qualified as Navigator
with effect from 13 February 63 Signed XXXXX Wg Cdr
Date !3 Feb 1963 Unit 1 ANS

No other certificate was issued.
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 18:44
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And here's the 1969 Syerston version:




And I had a grand total of 201 hours exactly, 60 Chipmunk and 141 JP Mk 4.
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 20:28
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Ah TTH, you see, all ours were handwritten. There was a Polish instructor on the staff, whose name I'm afraid I've forgotten, who undertook to write them all. I'll see if I can scan and post it.



Tiny pic, (no, I said "pic")

Last edited by Herod; 20th Apr 2019 at 20:43. Reason: Picture added
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Old 20th Apr 2019, 22:14
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The story of flying badges - not brevets - is here: https://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/documen...Journal-52.pdf

Page 103 for the article.
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Old 21st Apr 2019, 00:53
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I see yours has the exact wording as mine Tengah Type (post #3).

I like the term "directional consultant" btw
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Old 21st Apr 2019, 07:52
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As we were transiting the Lichfield RVC one evening, the ATCO asked what type of navigation system we used in the (pre-EGI) VC10K - it was in the time before the RVC was realigned with the Coningsby and Brawdy TACANs..

"A food*-powered universal navigation system - and he's sitting 2 ft behind me!" was my reply.

Tankertrashnav, haven't you heard of 'SODCAT'? 'Society of Directional Consultants and Allied Trades'.

Navigation is now mostly done by multiple INS/GPS - but Garmin can't cook beef olives over ROZ2 as Tengah Type could!


*In Tengah Type's case, quite a lot....!
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Old 21st Apr 2019, 08:24
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There is one big drawback to replacing navigators with GPS. When you're down, and in a survival situation, you can't eat the GPS.
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