Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Military Aviation
Reload this Page >

Question: Pilots in Crashing Aircraft Avoiding People on the Ground

Military Aviation A forum for the professionals who fly military hardware. Also for the backroom boys and girls who support the flying and maintain the equipment, and without whom nothing would ever leave the ground. All armies, navies and air forces of the world equally welcome here.

Question: Pilots in Crashing Aircraft Avoiding People on the Ground

Old 24th Feb 2019, 17:58
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lechlade, Glos.UK
Posts: 655
Originally Posted by Vendee View Post
I've not worked on Buccs but wouldn't the WoW switch prevent retraction on the ground?
Most military jets I have flown have a facility where if you twist the up button, then press it in, the gear will retract on the ground.
sharpend is offline  
Old 24th Feb 2019, 19:02
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Age: 50
Posts: 1,307
Originally Posted by sharpend View Post
Most military jets I have flown have a facility where if you twist the up button, then press it in, the gear will retract on the ground.
Wouldn't the weight on the wheels physically stop them though?
Tashengurt is offline  
Old 24th Feb 2019, 19:07
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Quite near 'An aerodrome somewhere in England'
Posts: 25,316
IIRC, the Bucc also had a button which could be pressed in for take-off, which would retract the landing gear as soon as weight came off the circuit protection relays?

Intended for use when being fired off the end of one of HM's grey war canoes.
BEagle is online now  
Old 24th Feb 2019, 19:12
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 713
msbbarratt - not sure which bit of Abingdon the Tornado would have flown over - I understood it flew in pretty much a straight line from the runway to the outskirts of Drayton where it crashed.

Incidentally Drayton must hold some sort of record for the number of mil aircraft which have crashed on or v near it: a Beverley, a Puma, the aforementioned Tornado, and a Tutor

dead_pan is offline  
Old 24th Feb 2019, 21:33
  #45 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lechlade, Glos.UK
Posts: 655
Originally Posted by Tashengurt View Post
Wouldn't the weight on the wheels physically stop them though?
In theory and in practice; yes. But if the aircraft is still moving (the only time perhaps that you would want to raise the gear), the movement invariably causes the undercarriage to collapse.
sharpend is offline  
Old 24th Feb 2019, 22:50
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 328
Originally Posted by dead_pan View Post
msbbarratt - not sure which bit of Abingdon the Tornado would have flown over - I understood it flew in pretty much a straight line from the runway to the outskirts of Drayton where it crashed.

Incidentally Drayton must hold some sort of record for the number of mil aircraft which have crashed on or v near it: a Beverley, a Puma, the aforementioned Tornado, and a Tutor
I recall it being pretty close to Masefield Crescent, going across the B4017 not very far south of the housing round there. At least, had they ejected earlier there'd been a good chance that that's where the aircraft may have ended up.

I'd always understood that they'd taken off, run into birds, tried to do a circuit then opted for the field instead when it became clear they weren't going to get back to the aerodrome. I was in Marcham at the time, and it sounded (nb I didn't clap eyes on it) like it came more or less overhead. But it's a long time ago now, so I'm quite prepared to go along with a more reliable source of information such as yourself.

Pretty sure a Mossie had come down near Drayton too. Think I've got the loss log somewhere, will have to check.

msbbarratt is offline  
Old 25th Feb 2019, 10:29
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Forest of Dean
Posts: 193
A Varsity crashed into the roof of a house in Gloucester in 1963 following an engine failure after a single engine overshoot at Staverton. The aircraft flew very low over the playing fields at Ribston Hall High School for girls before attempting to reach the playing fields at the Crypt School a few hundred yards further on. It is conjecture that the pilot's original intention was to crash land on the Ribston Hall playing fields, but at the last moment saw girls playing hockey. Unfortunately the pilots were both killed in the crash.

https://gloshistory.org.uk/reprints/gh200702.pdf

Last edited by izod tester; 25th Feb 2019 at 11:57.
izod tester is offline  
Old 25th Feb 2019, 11:41
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: london
Posts: 517
As the thread has drifted slightly, as a 6th former I shall always remember the Nimrod crash at Kinloss in 1980. That description at the time of the pilots actions left a deep impression on me.
rolling20 is offline  
Old 25th Feb 2019, 19:31
  #49 (permalink)  

Evertonian
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: #3117# Ppruner of the Year Nominee 2005
Posts: 9,669
https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2664843996878023
Buster Hyman is offline  
Old 26th Feb 2019, 11:42
  #50 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Scotland
Posts: 198
Originally Posted by rolling20 View Post
As the thread has drifted slightly, as a 6th former I shall always remember the Nimrod crash at Kinloss in 1980. That description at the time of the pilots actions left a deep impression on me.
Didn't this just come down in a straight line in Roseisle Forrest?
alwayslookingup is offline  
Old 26th Feb 2019, 14:04
  #51 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Hertfordshire
Age: 66
Posts: 276
Thanks to everyone for their contributions. I appreciate everyone posting openly on a troubling subject. I'm more enlightened as a result.
Hipper is offline  
Old 26th Feb 2019, 23:04
  #52 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Farnham, Surrey
Posts: 1,165
The single greatest amount of wartime damage to Chichester occurred on 11th May 1944 when a B-24 Liberator crashed onto the city laundry. The pilot pointed it out to sea, however after he baled out it returned:
B-24 Liberator Crash - Chichester



Mechta is offline  
Old 27th Feb 2019, 07:05
  #53 (permalink)  

Avoid imitations
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Wandering the FIR and cyberspace often at highly unsociable times
Posts: 12,110
Originally Posted by rolling20 View Post
As the thread has drifted slightly, as a 6th former I shall always remember the Nimrod crash at Kinloss in 1980. That description at the time of the pilots actions left a deep impression on me.
Steve Belcher, the co-pilot, was a friend of mine. We joined the RAF on the same day. He once told me of a premonition he had about that accident. RIP, Steve.
ShyTorque is offline  
Old 27th Feb 2019, 11:01
  #54 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Quite near 'An aerodrome somewhere in England'
Posts: 25,316
The late RFK, that well-known northern Irish WIWOL, aimed his Lightning out to sea when he had to part company with it off Valley...

...after first dialling up Dublin ILS and aiming the autopilot towards it!
BEagle is online now  
Old 27th Feb 2019, 12:18
  #55 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: yes
Posts: 148
Originally Posted by BEagle View Post
The late RFK, that well-known northern Irish WIWOL, aimed his Lightning out to sea when he had to part company with it off Valley...

...after first dialling up Dublin ILS and aiming the autopilot towards it!
I remember that incident. I read at time the Lightning ditched just 30 miles short of Dublin. That's pretty close.

As for avoiding people on the ground. If the pilot is staying with the aeroplane he'll always want to land in the nice field next to the school rather than the school itself. So yes he avoided the school and anything else designed to make a bad day even worse.

Steepclimb is offline  
Old 27th Feb 2019, 19:56
  #56 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: london
Posts: 517
Originally Posted by ShyTorque View Post
Steve Belcher, the co-pilot, was a friend of mine. We joined the RAF on the same day. He once told me of a premonition he had about that accident. RIP, Steve.
I never understood how the posthumous awards given to the pilots were not the same.
rolling20 is offline  
Old 27th Feb 2019, 20:00
  #57 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: london
Posts: 517
I remember being told of a Harrier pilot who banged out on exercise in Norway and his fellow squadron members were surprised when he turned up on the ground, as the Harrier was still flying above them in circles. Of course, I could have been having my leg pulled.
rolling20 is offline  
Old 27th Feb 2019, 21:05
  #58 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Suffolk
Age: 69
Posts: 22
Originally Posted by BEagle View Post
The late RFK, that well-known northern Irish WIWOL, aimed his Lightning out to sea when he had to part company with it off Valley...

...after first dialling up Dublin ILS and aiming the autopilot towards it!
I was in the tower at Valley for this incident and in the bar with said pilot after he was plucked out of the Irish sea and I knew him well. This post is defamatory and a total load of boŁŁocks.


Last edited by Odanrot; 27th Feb 2019 at 21:06. Reason: Spelling
Odanrot is offline  
Old 28th Feb 2019, 08:01
  #59 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Age: 53
Posts: 428
Maybe, just maybe, BEagle was indulging in a bit of banter.
ExRAFRadar is offline  
Old 28th Feb 2019, 08:14
  #60 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 4,533
This post is defamatory and a total load of boŁŁocks.
Which post?
Fareastdriver is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.