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Air Display experience

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Air Display experience

Old 3rd Aug 2018, 08:07
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The last I heard was a frantic controller pleading with him to descend back down to the altitude to which he had been cleared.
The first international air show at Zhuhai in 1998. Two Russian SU27s displaying for the week. On departing on the Sunday they took off for their base in Russia.

In a straight line, at their chosen altitude, without talking to anybody.
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Old 3rd Aug 2018, 09:27
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I guess the Su-27's knew that the UK didn't have anything that could intercept them at the time?
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Old 3rd Aug 2018, 09:38
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A brief dit on what one might call part of the "social side" of the Display Circus....

I was involved in the Circus in the late 70s, early 80s (dates, locations and types kept obscure to protect the guilty!), and recall the "airshow groupies". As the name would suggest, in those days of fewer STIs and less security, the aim of these ladies (sic), who visited many shows, was to experience ..... err ... relations ..... in the cockpit of parked display aircraft. Ideally, but not necessarily exclusively, with the pilot.

In the year I recall, it was the first (European?) display season for the F-15, who were very much the stars of the shows. And of course, No 1 on the girls' "hit list". Not sure if any managed it, but if not, it were not for want of trying.

Despite being (a little) more roomy and comfortable, my rotary cockpit (sic!) was sadly not in demand ........

.......... or perhaps it was just me..........
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Old 3rd Aug 2018, 10:27
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British Grand Prix, Brands Hatch circe '83?.
A fairly large air display was being held prior to the race.
I'd cycled some 10 - 12 miles from home and got myself a spot on an embankment to watch the show.
I can recall seeing a Vulcan but not much more.
I'll always remember a brown Lambo pulling up near me and the occupants calling me over to explain they had to leave suddenly and then offering me their tickets for free.
I declined. I was only there for the airshow.
They left looking very bemused with lots of head shaking.
I still kick myself from time to time.

Last edited by Tashengurt; 3rd Aug 2018 at 10:50.
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Old 3rd Aug 2018, 10:52
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Devil

Airshow Rule One - Static Displays only. Flying disrupts the Social Life.

Rule Two - Prime any US or Canadian Airshows that you are in their vicinity at the time, and to ask the MOD Participation Committee if they have any RAF aircraft in the vicinity that can participate.

Rule Three - Arrive on the Thursday before a weekend Airshow. This is so that your big jet came be parked early to faclitate the parking of the little jets that arrive on the Friday. Likewise do not depart until the Tuesday so it is easy for the airshow organisers to clear the little jets away on the Monday. Also allows you first choice of the associated parties, as well as more of them.

Rule Four - It is essential to have ground power for the show "for safety reasons" also handy to power the fridge and HiFi.

Rule Five - Beware of inviting such as A10 pilots on board ( bearing in mind Teeteringheads post#23)

Rule Six - Whatever happens at the airshow stays at the Airshow!!
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Old 3rd Aug 2018, 11:13
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Originally Posted by hunterboy
I guess the Su-27's knew that the UK didn't have anything that could intercept them at the time?
We could have sent Concorde up....
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Old 3rd Aug 2018, 21:13
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TT, breaking rule #6

We were sent to Oldenberg as an intruder aircraft. When we were leaving we were invited back for an air show and "bring a Buccaneer".

The powers that be would not permit us to go the Air Show but permitted a long range n
Navigation exercise. On arrival we were greeting by dolly birds in Red Flying suits with can of beer. There was something wrong with their zips.

That might they organised a P Up in a hangar for air show and base personnel -2500 people. They next night another party with towns folk too - 4500. They could certainly organise a party . . .
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Old 4th Aug 2018, 08:49
  #28 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Tashengurt
British Grand Prix, Brands Hatch circe '83?.
A fairly large air display was being held prior to the race.
I'd cycled some 10 - 12 miles from home and got myself a spot on an embankment to watch the show.
I can recall seeing a Vulcan but not much more.
I'll always remember a brown Lambo pulling up near me and the occupants calling me over to explain they had to leave suddenly and then offering me their tickets for free.
I declined. I was only there for the airshow.
They left looking very bemused with lots of head shaking.
I still kick myself from time to time.
I was working that Grand Prix (I'm not a pilot) and remember the air show for several reasons. One was standing in the control tower and looking DOWN into the cockpit of one of the syncho pair of the Red Arrows as the planes crossed BELOW me. One the highlights of the show was a Harrier that had been in the Falklands and helped in recapturing them from the Argentinians. The plane came in, landed and parked on the oval that formed the centre of one part of the racetrack so it was on display to as many people as possible. . No protection from any errant racing car but fortunately none hit it. The pilot was likewise famous, having, if I remember correctly, invented the Harrier's method of evading incoming Argentinian planes approaching from behind by using its vectored thrust to jump straight up, let the Etendard fly underneath and then drop down again to be in optimum position to attack it.

He performed at the event by taking off, hovering at about 250 feet over the centre of the circuit (South Bank for those who know it) which was just across the track from the pits. The F1 teams were all set up with trucks, marquees, temporary shelters of one sort and another, and were preparing for a weekend blending fast racing with socialising as they set up temporary dining areas so their guests could watch the air display as well as the racing.

His display was sensational - huge noise (much louder than the F1 cars) as it spooled up and then went straight up before he lifted the nose to accelerate up and away. He performed various manoeuvres that no normal plane could do including flying backwards before ending his display by hovering at about 250 feet over South Bank, spinning slowly on the spot, gently dipping the nose for the now famous Harrier bow towards the pits and lifting the nose in an earsplitting blast, soaring away once more to circle before landing back on the oval in front of a now completely deafened crowd. The trees behind South Bank had flapped frantically in the downwash. I had never seen a Harrier before, let alone this sort of stuff and found it quite emotionally intense. Youtube has an excellent video of one performing at Eastbourne.

He did this routine on the Friday and Saturday. However, on the Sunday, the day of the Grand Prix he was performing a few minutes before the start of the race. I suddenly noticed something subtly different. While he still hovered over South Bank and bowed towards the pits he hadn't rotated the aircraft on the spot. He did so AFTER the bow, and the aircraft didn't quite rotate on the spot but seemed to slip very slightly towards the pits. As he lifted the nose to accelerate away, the massive downwash hit the pits, sending awnings, tables, bottles of wine, advertising leaflets, guest's hairstyles and hats cartwheeling around in the blast. Mechanics were hanging on to poles, gazebos were collapsing and general chaos ensued. Within moments he had lifted and calm returned but he didn't as he returned to base. The GP managed to start on time, but the confusion behind the scenes took a while to sort out.

I thought for a long time that this had been an unfortunate mishandling. I learned much later that it was nothing of the sort. Apparently, there had been a big F1 party on the Saturday night, and the pilot had turned up smartly turned out for it, only to be highly embarrassed to be turned away at the door. This had not gone down well. Moral of the story? NEVER upset a man with the keys to a warplane.
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Old 5th Aug 2018, 19:54
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I recall being at Prestwick in 1972 when they had the bi-annual Scottish International Air Show. The Belgian Air Force 'Slivers' were in attendance, after getting airborne they disappeared off stage somewhere. I don't recall their being called in but I certainly knew all about when they re-appeared. Their opening pass was from crowd rear, side by side very low and very fast in full afterburner. As they arrived overhead I felt my spine jar as I reacted to the sudden impact on the senses! Luxury!

FB
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Old 5th Aug 2018, 21:52
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As he lifted the nose to accelerate away, the massive downwash hit the pits, sending awnings, tables, bottles of wine, advertising leaflets, guest's hairstyles and hats cartwheeling around in the blast. Mechanics were hanging on to poles, gazebos were collapsing and general chaos ensued. Within moments he had lifted and calm returned but he didn't as he returned to base. The GP managed to start on time, but the confusion behind the scenes took a while to sort out.
I was working at one of the Grand Prix where the Harrier performed, possibly 1980 (1983 was Silverstone) - the carnage was spectacular and I seem to remember the organizers were walking round writing cheques to cover the damage. It was particularly the tents etc at the top of South Bank that suffered
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Old 5th Aug 2018, 22:36
  #31 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by topgas
I was working at one of the Grand Prix where the Harrier performed, possibly 1980 (1983 was Silverstone) - the carnage was spectacular and I seem to remember the organizers were walking round writing cheques to cover the damage. It was particularly the tents etc at the top of South Bank that suffered
No, there were two Grands Epreuves in England that year. Silverstone was in July and the race at Brands Hatch, called the European Grand Prix, was held at the end of September. Remember the Falklands War was in 1982!
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Old 6th Aug 2018, 13:31
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Currently enjoying our biennial three week air show, known locally as Exercise Pitch Black.

They started back when the RAAF flew Mirages, the Kiwis still had Skyhawks and USAF B-52's were commonplace.

This is year we have RAAF Hornets, Growlers and Rhinos, Wedgetail, C-17, KC-30, C-130, C-27 and PC-9 (FAC).

Joining in are USAF F16's and FA-18's, USMC F-16's and Ospreys, Indonesian F-16's, Thai Gripens, Singaporean F-15's and F-16's, Indian Su-30's, French Rafales, Malaysian A400, Canadian C-130 and assorted others.

Last week included flypasts pasts by most types of our Mindle Beach Sunset Market, culminating in a sneak, low level high speed pass by one of the Classic Hornets. Shock and Awe was reportedly an understatement.

Saturday was was an open day at the RAAF Base with static displays only, sadly. OH&S has killed off the flying displays for now.

For or the next two weeks, we'll have two or three waves launch most days, with ops running to 2300 each night.

Large gatherings of spectators gather at the end of the runway to watch the departures and arrivals.

And it doesn't cost us spectators a cent.
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Old 13th Oct 2022, 05:20
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Originally Posted by BFM
No, there were two Grands Epreuves in England that year. Silverstone was in July and the race at Brands Hatch, called the European Grand Prix, was held at the end of September. Remember the Falklands War was in 1982!
Originally Posted by BFM
I was working that Grand Prix (I'm not a pilot) and remember the air show for several reasons. One was standing in the control tower and looking DOWN into the cockpit of one of the syncho pair of the Red Arrows as the planes crossed BELOW me. One the highlights of the show was a Harrier that had been in the Falklands and helped in recapturing them from the Argentinians. The plane came in, landed and parked on the oval that formed the centre of one part of the racetrack so it was on display to as many people as possible. . No protection from any errant racing car but fortunately none hit it. The pilot was likewise famous, having, if I remember correctly, invented the Harrier's method of evading incoming Argentinian planes approaching from behind by using its vectored thrust to jump straight up, let the Etendard fly underneath and then drop down again to be in optimum position to attack it.

He performed at the event by taking off, hovering at about 250 feet over the centre of the circuit (South Bank for those who know it) which was just across the track from the pits. The F1 teams were all set up with trucks, marquees, temporary shelters of one sort and another, and were preparing for a weekend blending fast racing with socialising as they set up temporary dining areas so their guests could watch the air display as well as the racing.

His display was sensational - huge noise (much louder than the F1 cars) as it spooled up and then went straight up before he lifted the nose to accelerate up and away. He performed various manoeuvres that no normal plane could do including flying backwards before ending his display by hovering at about 250 feet over South Bank, spinning slowly on the spot, gently dipping the nose for the now famous Harrier bow towards the pits and lifting the nose in an earsplitting blast, soaring away once more to circle before landing back on the oval in front of a now completely deafened crowd. The trees behind South Bank had flapped frantically in the downwash. I had never seen a Harrier before, let alone this sort of stuff and found it quite emotionally intense. Youtube has an excellent video of one performing at Eastbourne.

He did this routine on the Friday and Saturday. However, on the Sunday, the day of the Grand Prix he was performing a few minutes before the start of the race. I suddenly noticed something subtly different. While he still hovered over South Bank and bowed towards the pits he hadn't rotated the aircraft on the spot. He did so AFTER the bow, and the aircraft didn't quite rotate on the spot but seemed to slip very slightly towards the pits. As he lifted the nose to accelerate away, the massive downwash hit the pits, sending awnings, tables, bottles of wine, advertising leaflets, guest's hairstyles and hats cartwheeling around in the blast. Mechanics were hanging on to poles, gazebos were collapsing and general chaos ensued. Within moments he had lifted and calm returned but he didn't as he returned to base. The GP managed to start on time, but the confusion behind the scenes took a while to sort out.

I thought for a long time that this had been an unfortunate mishandling. I learned much later that it was nothing of the sort. Apparently, there had been a big F1 party on the Saturday night, and the pilot had turned up smartly turned out for it, only to be highly embarrassed to be turned away at the door. This had not gone down well. Moral of the story? NEVER upset a man with the keys to a warplane.
Originally Posted by BFM
No, there were two Grands Epreuves in England that year. Silverstone was in July and the race at Brands Hatch, called the European Grand Prix, was held at the end of September. Remember the Falklands War was in 1982!
It was 1980. I had been on 20sqn in the 70's so Harrier displays were nothing new to me, until this one. I was watching from the Bank at Clearways/Clark Curve and the return flypast down the lowest part of the circuit was below where we were siting. The GP was held at Brands Hatch every 2 years. Apparently, a Harrier did returned in 1982.
(I would post the reports from Autosport magazine at the time, but I don't appear to be able to as I'm being told I can't post URLs, which I'm not trying to do)
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Old 13th Oct 2022, 13:52
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Originally Posted by Doubletop_
It was 1980. I had been on 20sqn in the 70's so Harrier displays were nothing new to me, until this one. I was watching from the Bank at Clearways/Clark Curve and the return flypast down the lowest part of the circuit was below where we were siting. The GP was held at Brands Hatch every 2 years. Apparently, a Harrier did returned in 1982.
(I would post the reports from Autosport magazine at the time, but I don't appear to be able to as I'm being told I can't post URLs, which I'm not trying to do)
Hello Doubletop, and welcome.
If there is a link to those reports, go ahead and try to type them in, or cut and past them in to your next post, but before you submit the post ("submit reply") first add spaces between the letters of whatever .org or .com or .net is in the link.
I can then make the link work via my mod powers.
Until you have 10 posts the system will not allow posting links. It is an anti spam measure that the forum owners prefer.
Once again welcome, and thanks for joining the discussion.
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Old 14th Oct 2022, 06:43
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Buccaneer Display, Mildenhall - 1992

Quite literally the most impressive display of a military aircraft that I have ever seen. The aircraft was immediately rolled on take off with seemingly feet to spare between the wings and the runway, followed by some very noisy, high speed and low level flying! It was absolutely spectacular!

I also saw a 16 ship Phantom flypast at Conningsby airshow in 1992, which was also very impressive!
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Old 14th Oct 2022, 12:12
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Puma to Brize open day, with Gimpy mounted in doorway, crew and rest of us showing people around it, was getting lots of excited kids on board and showing them how to cock the Gimpy, aim it at the RAF Policeman and pull the trigger, much to the mirth of all around.. until my relief told me to desist

Later on about five or six RAF officer nurses turfed up in best blue asking to have a look inside, now as you know the steps on a Puma are not really designed for women in tightish skirts, so up they pulled them one at a time giving one an eyeful.. safely ensconced in the cockpit and front seats I was asked to take a photograph of them all. Happy to oblige they all said smile and think something, my mind forgets what... and then to me and think of what you are thinking off.
Surprising how I was suddenly relieved after taking the pictures and having a chat as the crew reappeared like flies round sh*t.. A few weeks later back at work who should turf up but all the nurses having been invited for a flight.. as they all traipsed through the line office, they all smiled, say hello to me and ask how I am and came over to have a little chat... those on my shift were agog that I appeared to know all these lovelies .
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Old 14th Oct 2022, 12:16
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Flying into Leuchars Airshow in a Fouga Magistair and getting cleared down to low altitude then being told to hold while the French practiced their airshow routine, not a happy chappy up front as the fuel burn went up and finally cleared to land or do a fast run in and break if we desired, offer declined as the the fuel low level warning lights were on as we were on finals.
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Old 14th Oct 2022, 15:04
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Originally Posted by english_electric
Quite literally the most impressive display of a military aircraft that I have ever seen. The aircraft was immediately rolled on take off with seemingly feet to spare between the wings and the runway, followed by some very noisy, high speed and low level flying! It was absolutely spectacular!
No Buccaneer displayed at Mildenhall in 1992. There was one the following year, but it was certainly not "immediately rolled on take-off".
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Old 14th Oct 2022, 17:35
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Two outstanding memories, first is watching in horror as a Vulcan disintegrates and crashes at Syerston and a few days later accompanying my mother on the YMCA van serving tea to the airman picking up the confetti which was all that was left of the aircraft. Interestingly the air display had continued although I found it hard to watch after the Vulcan. Second at an open day at Leconfield in about 1971, following a well judged display by our local lightning test pilot, getting my first view of a Phantom as it arrived in burner between two hangars scaring the wits out of most of the crowd leaving children crying and dogs barking - fantastic stuff!

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Old 14th Oct 2022, 19:46
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The 1977 Royal Pageant airshow at White Waltham was one of the most memorable of the many I have attended.
The sight of a BA VC10 settling into ground effect along the grass runway during it's first low pass is a never to be repeated memory.
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