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Supermarine Attacker

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Supermarine Attacker

Old 23rd Jul 2018, 13:25
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Supermarine Attacker

Looking for anyone who flew the Attacker during it's Royal Navy service. This is the final type outstanding in my search for people who flew all the FAA fixed-wing types post-war for a new series of books.
Thanks in anticipation!
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Old 23rd Jul 2018, 14:44
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Narrow field, eh? Good hunting!!
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Old 23rd Jul 2018, 19:01
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'Baay' (Barry) was a real lounge lizard who used to drink in our local Somerset pub in the 1970s. Ex-FAA, buggers grips, cravat and blazer with rather an affected manner which he assumed would endear him to the laydeeez…

But his tale of flying an Attacker was quite amusing: "Eh was right overhead London one night when the dem engine flamed out and wouldn't relight. So eh managed to make it to Ford and landed orff a glide approach. Then to the wardroom for a stiffener or two!"
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Old 23rd Jul 2018, 22:01
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Steve, Sadly, I never flew the Attacker. But, my ol’ Dad Was the PMO (SMO) at RNAS Abbotsinch (HMS Sanderling) in the mid ‘50s.i remember him taking me around the hangars showing me the latest naval aircraft which were the Sea Prince, the Meteor and the Attacker which the kindly maintainers would let me sit in (I was around 9 at the time). I think the resident squadron was 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron.
Tail wheel jet - wow!!
mcdhu
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Old 24th Jul 2018, 00:08
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Tail wheel jet
With Spitfire wings, well, from the Spiteful to be absolutely correct. Was called the Jet Spiteful originally.
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Old 24th Jul 2018, 11:53
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Originally Posted by BEagle View Post
'Baay' (Barry) was a real lounge lizard who used to drink in our local Somerset pub in the 1970s. Ex-FAA, buggers grips, cravat and blazer with rather an affected manner which he assumed would endear him to the laydeeez…

But his tale of flying an Attacker was quite amusing: "Eh was right overhead London one night when the dem engine flamed out and wouldn't relight. So eh managed to make it to Ford and landed orff a glide approach. Then to the wardroom for a stiffener or two!"
"Bugger's grips!" I have not heard of them in 60 years, but the last time was a Commander F......... RN {Rtd] who had a senior post in Met Oceanography and was i/c the Nautical branch [why we duplicated the Navy nobody told me]. His bugger's grips were magnificent, you could swing off them, but he was a creature of icy menace to youngsters so we avoided taking the proverbial.

Whereas taches, beards, stubble and the rest are commonplace, how many grips do we see in a year?. I am sure that I would notice, even if only to compare with the late Commander.

As for the Attacker, it was an ugly beast, unlike the Sea Hawk [much as Swift versus Hunter, obviously].
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Old 24th Jul 2018, 13:37
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I believe the Swift was pretty much a swept wing Attacker with a training wheel and presumably a bigger engine wasn't it?
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Old 24th Jul 2018, 14:18
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Originally Posted by mcdhu View Post
Steve, Sadly, I never flew the Attacker. But, my ol’ Dad Was the PMO (SMO) at RNAS Abbotsinch (HMS Sanderling) in the mid ‘50s.i remember him taking me around the hangars showing me the latest naval aircraft which were the Sea Prince, the Meteor and the Attacker which the kindly maintainers would let me sit in (I was around 9 at the time). I think the resident squadron was 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron.
Tail wheel jet - wow!!
mcdhu
I recall clearly the Attacker at Sanderling, in the latter years it was gate guard at the Inchinnan \Abbotsinch Road gate and I think it spent its last few years mounted on a pole. I saw a lot of things fly into or from Abbotsinch; including Gannets being towed in convoy through the streets of Paisley; but can not recall ever seeing an Attacker airborne.

YS
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Old 24th Jul 2018, 15:27
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Originally Posted by langleybaston View Post
"Bugger's grips!" I have not heard of them in 60 years, but the last time was a Commander F......... RN {Rtd] who had a senior post in Met Oceanography and was i/c the Nautical branch [why we duplicated the Navy nobody told me]. His bugger's grips were magnificent, you could swing off them, but he was a creature of icy menace to youngsters so we avoided taking the proverbial.

Whereas taches, beards, stubble and the rest are commonplace, how many grips do we see in a year?. I am sure that I would notice, even if only to compare with the late Commander.
I have obviously led a sheltered life and had never heard of them, so goggled it .. and the results were predictable and worrying in equal measure.

If I tried swinging off my nearest and dearest's "bugger's grips" then I would not be long for this world

1. Or: buggery grips / buggers handles , long sideburns or a handlebar moustache. Chiefly British usage. 2. More rarely, the female pubic hair.
https://www.definition-of.com/buggers+grips

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Old 24th Jul 2018, 15:55
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The late and lamented ACM Sir Peter Squire (CAS) sported the grips. Nothing pubic to my knowledge.
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Old 24th Jul 2018, 22:03
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Originally Posted by cargosales View Post
I have obviously led a sheltered life and had never heard of them, so goggled it .. and the results were predictable and worrying in equal measure.

If I tried swinging off my nearest and dearest's "bugger's grips" then I would not be long for this world
Sadly the truly distinguished gentleman concerned is no longer with us, but here's a fine nautical example for your delectation - and of course to preserve you from the wrath of your current next of kin....

https://uboat.net/allies/commanders/83.html

Jack
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Old 25th Jul 2018, 10:27
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My Dad remembers watching one make a crash landing at Culdrose in 1952 (I think)... it had a fuel problem I believe and landed very short of runway 30, actually touching down on the other side of the road that then bi-sected CU. It went through a fence, slid across the road (there was a aluminium skid mark for many years on the road) and was arrested by the fence on the other side of the road. Pilot got out OK ('Boots' Nethersole I think) and a small fire started that my Dad helped to extinguish (he was only a 16 year old 'spotter' at the time!)

Interesting times back then...
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Old 25th Jul 2018, 10:40
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Thanks all, sitting on one and seeing one crash is getting closer to what I need.....
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Old 25th Jul 2018, 12:11
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I can remember a family holiday on Hayling Island in the early 1950s watching Attackers attacking targets moored offshore,I can't remember if they were using guns,rockets or bombs.
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Old 26th Jul 2018, 07:52
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Great stuff here. By the way did you get a pilot's view of that other wonderful fighter, the Westland Wyvern?
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Old 26th Jul 2018, 16:13
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Yes I did, courtesy of Bob Edward. Here is some of what he had to say about it:

“The aircraft was a delight to fly unless something went wrong, when it could be a very dangerous beast. Although often described as a fighter it was not one. Yes, it was armed with four 20 mm cannon sited in the wings, with 600 rounds per minute rates of fire and so was not defenceless in the air. It was very much an air to service weapon of war. It was not an aerobatic aircraft, was assessed as not being recoverable from a spin but was a beautifully steady weapon delivery platform. The cockpit was roomy, allowing plenty of room for re-folding maps, using hand-held navigation aids etc. There was even a flexible tube that could be used to urinate – I never heard that anyone used it."
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Old 26th Jul 2018, 20:09
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Did he mean ‘Air to Surface’?

(Speaking as someone who said BV in an interview meaning Blue Vixen...which got turned into Beyond Visual at some point prior to going to press).
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 08:44
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King 2*** me too, Bracklesham Bay 1953 (watched coronation on tiny TV in the village hall) but best bit was watching the aircraft presumably from Ford bombing, rocketing and cannon firing at the target wrecks off shore
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 09:13
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Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
I believe the Swift was pretty much a swept wing Attacker with a training wheel and presumably a bigger engine wasn't it?
In a simlar way to the Hunter being a swept wing Seahawk - it was a progressive development through a series of intermediate designs
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 13:10
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Originally Posted by Davef68 View Post
In a simlar way to the Hunter being a swept wing Seahawk - it was a progressive development through a series of intermediate designs

Yes the Type 510 experimental prototype was the arguably main "intermediate" design - it had the swept wing but retained the Attacker's tail-wheel, whereas the Swift got a nosewheel.
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