Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Military Aviation
Reload this Page >

P38 Lightning question

Military Aviation A forum for the professionals who fly military hardware. Also for the backroom boys and girls who support the flying and maintain the equipment, and without whom nothing would ever leave the ground. All armies, navies and air forces of the world equally welcome here.

P38 Lightning question

Old 8th Feb 2018, 02:50
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 1,796
P38 Lightning question

Always been a big fan of this aircraft

It had several unique features, the most unusual
to me was the use of a control yoke instead of a
joystick, I think this was to provide the pilot
with more leverage in roll control at higher airspeeds


Does anyone know of any other fighter that had a control yoke ?
stilton is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 07:10
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Cambridge
Posts: 137
The Beaufighter had a control yoke on top of a central pole. The Lightning still had a pole but it was offset to the right hand side.
Dark Helmet is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 07:45
  #3 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 9,845
Just to muddy the waters..... Spitfire......

ORAC is online now  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 08:03
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West London
Posts: 987
Originally Posted by Dark Helmet View Post
The Lightning still had a pole but it was offset to the right hand side.
^This.

It's probably a legacy design from the day when, multi's had yoke's and single had sticks.

That can be seen in the Mosquito, which may have been the only aircraft type that used both, with yoke wheel in the glass nose 'bomber/recce' versions, and a fighter type stick in the solid nose fighter/trainer versions.
GeeRam is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 08:06
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: London
Age: 74
Posts: 279
Originally Posted by ORAC View Post
Just to muddy the waters..... Spitfire......

On the Spitfire perhaps it was so one could put your left hand on the yoke, before releasing it with your right hand which was used to raise or lower the chassis, gear !
RetiredBA/BY is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 08:58
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Hanging off the end of a thread
Posts: 15,652
I think this was to provide the pilot
with more leverage in roll control at higher airspeeds
And when you lose an engine on one side.

Spitfire style yoke is common throught the whole of the British aircraft types of that period up to and through the likes of the Fairey Gannet etc. I often wondered as a stick is tailored to a hand, if wounded in one arm the likes of a Spit yoke would be easier to handle with the other.
NutLoose is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 09:46
  #7 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 1,796
Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
And when you lose an engine on one side.

Spitfire style yoke is common throught the whole of the British aircraft types of that period up to and through the likes of the Fairey Gannet etc. I often wondered as a stick is tailored to a hand, if wounded in one arm the likes of a Spit yoke would be easier to handle with the other.
Not following you there, an engine failure and resultant yaw
would be compensated for with rudder
stilton is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 10:29
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Hanging off the end of a thread
Posts: 15,652
Secondary effect of Yaw is roll

And if in a combat aircraft if you are having to roll it, surely you would be fighting the live engine and hence need greater leverage of a yoke. ?

.

Last edited by NutLoose; 8th Feb 2018 at 10:45.
NutLoose is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 10:45
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 145
And the secondary effect of yaw is? Roll. Asymetric flight requires use of both rudder and aileron. - Nutloose - well done you beat me to it!
olddog is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 14:33
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Uranus
Posts: 326
Which of the Yoke / Column / Spitfire style grip / Ram's Horn Concorde style felt the most intuitive?

But I suppose they were tailored for that specific application.
Shaft109 is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 15:50
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: virginia, USA
Age: 52
Posts: 743
Originally Posted by stilton View Post

Does anyone know of any other fighter that had a control yoke ?

P-61 Black Widow had a yoke- if you include night fighters.
sandiego89 is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 17:48
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Hanging off the end of a thread
Posts: 15,652
Originally Posted by Shaft109 View Post
Which of the Yoke / Column / Spitfire style grip / Ram's Horn Concorde style felt the most intuitive?

But I suppose they were tailored for that specific application.
The Rams horn is an ergonomic design that is designed to eliminate fatigue on wrists etc, indeed the same idea is also used in cooking utensils, this will explain all.


EaziGrip® Frying Pan - EaziGrip Shop
NutLoose is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 19:22
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: BOQ
Age: 74
Posts: 473
Does anyone know of any other fighter that had a control yoke ?
Do a search on F-102 or F-106 cockpit photos.

Not for ease of roll control in these two, but to conveniently access all the buttons and radar controls and minimize carpal tunnel.

Of course these were interceptors, not fighters.
OK465 is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 19:31
  #14 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 9,845
ORAC is online now  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 19:57
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: London/Oxford/New York
Posts: 2,090
Mosquito fighters had a stick, Mosquito bombers had a yoke.
pr00ne is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 21:12
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: River Thames & Surrey
Age: 70
Posts: 8,024
Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
The Rams horn is an ergonomic design that is designed to eliminate fatigue on wrists etc, indeed the same idea is also used in cooking utensils, this will explain all.
Also fitted to Tridents and some Islanders.
chevvron is offline  
Old 8th Feb 2018, 23:58
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Hanging off the end of a thread
Posts: 15,652
And jetstream
NutLoose is offline  
Old 9th Feb 2018, 06:46
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Back in Blighty
Age: 68
Posts: 171
And Dominie
50+Ray is offline  
Old 9th Feb 2018, 09:46
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Under the clouds now
Age: 81
Posts: 2,129
And Britannia
brakedwell is offline  
Old 9th Feb 2018, 10:05
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: s e england
Posts: 72
It is said that redundant ex Vulcan / Victor yokes were/are used as the control yokes for Trident submarines, and, I have to say, they do look very similar
pettinger93 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.