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A400M Flight Testing Progress

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A400M Flight Testing Progress

Old 28th Mar 2011, 04:16
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Please tell me that was a joke
Waaaahhhhhhh!
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Old 28th Mar 2011, 22:31
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Except for the slightly inconvenient fact that the A400M wouldn't fit in any of the existing hangars...

For the enormous cost of moving everything to Brize you could've built the mother of all hangars......
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Old 29th Mar 2011, 01:30
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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"For the enormous cost of moving everything to Brize you could've built the mother of all hangars...... "


Er, but you'd still be running two large stations, which surely is around twice as expensive...?

Really don't see the point as then you'd have about twenty aircraft at each station. Rather expensive don't you think?
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Old 29th Mar 2011, 09:21
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Cost of relocating Lyneham to Brize is around £200 million, payback date around 15 to 20 years provided nothing else changes....

That's more than enough to run Lyneham for many years, and you get 2 more runways, a Crash cat 4A diversion/ PD in the south of England, you can fly 24/7 without much complaint from the locals (Tac/NVG at Brize - I don't think so!), even circuits at the weekend at Brize is pushing it.

This argument has been thrashed out endlessly, Lyneham will close, but don't let anyone be fooled that it will save any money, except perhaps in the very long term, but it's now that we're short of cash.

Besides, in 10 or so years when they want to make more cuts, they'll have nothing left to close! (Mil ramp on the side at Birmingham maybe?)
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Old 29th Mar 2011, 09:43
  #25 (permalink)  

 
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Mil ramp on the side at Birmingham maybe?
Yes, but you wouldn't be able to wear your uniform......

airsound
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Old 7th Apr 2011, 12:07
  #26 (permalink)  

 
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News from Airbus Mil and EADS
A400M contract amendment finalised with customer nations

Leiden/Seville, 7 April 2011 – EADS and Airbus welcome the conclusion of contract amendment negotiations with OCCAR and the seven A400M launch customer nations. The contract amendment was signed today in Seville by Patrick Bellouard, Director of OCCAR – Executive Agency, and Airbus Military CEO Domingo Ureña, in the presence of Spanish Minister of Defence Carme Chacón. National armament directors and other representatives from customer nations also attended the ceremony.

The Contract Amendment now implements the changes which were agreed in principle by the Participating Nations with EADS and Airbus Military in the Frame Agreement signed on 5th March 2010.

“This is a major milestone, and EADS is particularly proud to have the support of all governments involved in this cooperation programme that represents a strategic capacity for Europe and its defence, and for the new generation of military transport worldwide. The A400M is a fantastic new aircraft already flying with outstanding and unrivalled capabilities", said EADS CEO Louis Gallois.

“From an industrial point of view, the programme is on track. This enabled us to agree, with full confidence on the industrial go-ahead of the programme over a month ago,“ said Domingo Ureña, Airbus Military CEO. “We are also very satisfied with the progress of the Flight Test programme which confirms day by day the soundness of the aircraft. Also, all the pilots of the Air Forces who have already tried and flown the aircraft, expressed great satisfaction about its agility and capabilities. We are sure that, once it gets better known, many more Air Forces around the world will be keen to have it in their fleets”.

With four aircraft flying, the A400M has achieved over 1,400 test flight hours and close to 450 flights. The fifth aircraft is complete and has started the final control phase prior to a first flight in early Fall. Civil Certification is to be achieved before year end, and first delivery to first operator – the French Air Force – by the turn of the year 2012 /early 2013. Today Airbus Military holds 174 firm orders from eight nations, the seven launch nations (Belgium, France, Germany, Luxemburg, Spain, Turkey and the UK) for 170, plus four for Malaysia.
airsound
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 09:05
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Much to my digust I was told that Airbus use American English as an official language. This was after I was repremanded for changing the word airplane to aeroplane in all the documents I was sent to review.
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 09:16
  #28 (permalink)  

 
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VX, as a 'bus fan, and an English wordsmith, I am absoutely horrified by that news....

I have no problems at all with American English, which is often unreasonably maligned this side of the pond. But surely, if Airbus stands for anything, it stands for Europe competing successfully with the US. Anybody might think that the French don't include England in greater Europe.....

How very sad - but thank you for bringing us the news.

airsound

Incidentally, 'fall' does not need a capital 'f'....

Last edited by airsound; 8th Apr 2011 at 09:18. Reason: fall
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 13:57
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Angel "Airblish"

Bit of pernicketry first - I hope VX's command of "English English" usually extended to his spelling of "reprimanded" when checking Airbus documentation ... Mustn't let the side down, you know ...

A private rule I used during my years of writing material for my Airbus colleagues was "always think of who your intended readers are". As most likely perusers of, for example Tech Docs will have learned their English outside UK, they'll follow your reasoning a bit more easily if you use the probably American spelling they also use. Similarly, if you're words are directed to BA or British Ministers, don't cause potential offence by using US conventions. And, if the person above you insists on US usage, and you can't abide "airplane" - why not choose "aircraft", which is neutral and possibly more learned-sounding ?

UK (unfortunately?) is a very small proportion of the world market in any case, and however much many of us regret that, (shades of "Empire of the Clouds") British spelling of English is a minority affair.

BTW - There were, though, lots of unusual flavours (probably still are) in documents produced by many a multi-lingual service - lots of fun in that, which could be smoothed out with a bit of tact.

PS I also once worked in Germany on Docs produced by many subcontractors across the world. We reckoned the notice on the office door should read "Hier est Anglofranzoski gespoken". The MD liked the idea too ...
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 14:06
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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A private rule I used during my years of writing material for my Airbus colleagues was "always think of who your intended readers are".
Similarly, if you're words are directed to BA or British Ministers, .....
You've lost this Geordie.

British spelling of English is a minority affair.
I question that. Webster's influence was very limited.
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 14:10
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Applologies

Mea maxima culpa - please delete the apostrophe and the final "e" in "you're".
Petard, own, hoist with ...
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 14:18
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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In any case :-

Aeroplane, originally a French loanword with a different meaning, is the older spelling. The oldest recorded uses of the spelling airplane are British. According to the OED, "[a]irplane became the standard American term (replacing aeroplane) after this was adopted by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1916. Although A. Lloyd James recommended its adoption by the BBC in 1928, it has until recently been no more than an occasional form in British English."

In the British National Corpus, aeroplane outnumbers airplane by more than 7:1 in the UK. The case is similar for the British aerodrome and American airdrome, although both of these terms are now obsolete. Aerodrome is used merely as a technical term in all of Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. The prefixes aero- and air- both mean air, with the first coming from the Ancient Greek word ἀήρ (āēr). Thus, the prefix appears in aeronautics, aerostatics, aerodynamics, aeronautical engineering, and so on, while the second occurs (invariably) in aircraft, airport, airliner, airmail etc.

In Canada, airplane is more common than aeroplane, although aeroplane is not unknown, especially in parts of French Canada (where it is however used only in English – the French term is avion, and the French word aéroplane designates 19th-century flying machines).
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 15:05
  #33 (permalink)  

 
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What a masterful exposition, forget, thank you!

I would only add that the UK CAA, presumably taking its cue from legal documentation, uses 'aerodrome' (not airfield), but 'aircraft' (not aeroplane).

Sorry about the thread drift - but I've always been mildly fascinated by the fact that Americans wear flight suits and talk about flying safety, while Brits wear flying suits and talk about flight safety.

And don't get me started again on 'base' versus 'station'.....

airsound
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 15:37
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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And don't get me started again on 'base' versus 'station'.....
I think the founding fathers were happy with 'camp'. Then again, I don't recall Camp Routine Orders.

MoD Web says camp is OK.

ROYAL AIR FORCE GIBRALTAR – A BRIEF HISTORY

The first two RAF camps were constructed in Gibraltar at the beginning of the second world war, The first was North Front Camp which was previously a racecourse, this was to become the main camp. The second was New Camp which was built on reclaimed land next to Montague Bastion.
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 16:03
  #35 (permalink)  

 
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And I don't recall ever coming across a camp commander, or, perish the thought, a camp wo. Ooh-er missus

airsound
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 16:14
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Surely a Station is a place from whence one catches a train or, heaven forbid, a bus?
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 16:45
  #37 (permalink)  
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Forget

I'm here chum. Actually in Airbus PR we still use British English. I think the Fall was EADS-influenced, where things are not so simple.
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 19:14
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by airsound View Post
I would only add that the UK CAA, presumably taking its cue from legal documentation, uses 'aerodrome' (not airfield), but 'aircraft' (not aeroplane).
There is justification for their choice of words.

Aerodrome covers airfields, airports and (I suspect) heliports and such.
Aircraft cover balloons, helicopters and such which are all part of the CAA's remit.

If anyone wants to question the use of aeroplane, may I suggest that they think about the fact that aeroplanes fly thanks to the exploitation of the laws of AEROdynamics (not AIRdynamics)? That settles it as far as I'm concerned!
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Old 8th Apr 2011, 21:37
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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I have heard it said that Airbus people speak a patois all their own.

As a transplant I have managed not to get upset about "airplane", since "aeroplane" itself is a bit of a Greco-French mutt of a word. And to get back to the original point, I have learned to prefer the Anglo-Saxon "fall" to the Froggy import "Autumn".
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Old 9th Apr 2011, 06:09
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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Oh boy, I had a look at this thread because I thought it had updates on the A400M Flight tests..................but after the opening page it has changed into a lot of wittering about words!!

Anybody able to get the thread back onto its topic!
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