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Gaining An R.A.F Pilots Brevet In WW II

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Gaining An R.A.F Pilots Brevet In WW II

Old 24th Jul 2017, 13:02
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Glad you're enjoying it Danny..! We're away for a short break in a few days - but I'll post some more before we go.
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 14:59
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Latest posted to Facebook today:

To All of You who care about this Iconic Chapel,
A reminder about the Bromley Full Council Meeting tomorrow night, Tuesday 25th July. I have just been told that I will now be allowed just THREE MINUTES to present our case to all 60 Councillors at the Full Councill Meeting. Your presence to back up my statement will be invaluable!!
Please come to the Civic Centre, Stockwell Close, Bromley BRI 3UH for a 6.30 rally before the 7.00pm Meeting. Both Bromley South And North British Rail Stations are close by and a large multi-storey car park is adjacent to the Civic Centre.
Despite our pleas, no national newspapers have picked up on our campaign,even though this is of such national and international importance, so you really are our last chance!! Please still keep spreading the word, just Google: Protect Biggin Hill RAF Chapel.
Looking forward to seeing you!
Thank you all, Rita Radford
Rita Radford started this campaign on the 38 Degrees Campaigns by You website.
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 16:19
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George Duffee

sidevalve.
What a wonderful story. These men and women who operated the escape route at great peril to their own wellbeing deserve this country's most grateful thanks. I am not sure that they did.
When I was at Topcliffe in 1946 I became friendly with a fellow Staff W.op WO Pete Jezzard who whilst on 622 Squadron was shot down on the way back from a raid on Stuttgart in March 44. He baled out over France and whilst he never went in to details of his escape I imagine it followed much the same pattern as George's since he was eventually repatriated from Gibralter.
He returned to 622 and finished his tour at the end 0s 1944 being awarded the DFM.

Sadly Pete was later killed in early 1948 when the Wellington he was flying in on a cross country nav exercise failed to return and is believed to have crashed in the north sea.
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 17:09
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Hi TapH,

Sgt Peter Jezzard, radio operator on Lancaster Mk 1 (piloted by Sgt D B Hyde, RCAF), LL828, GI-J, was shot down during the night of 15-16 March 1944 by night fighters south east of Rouen after a raid on Stuttgart. He evaded successfully via the "Bourgogne Evasion" network organised by Georges Broussine. I don't have much info on the activities of that network. His evasion is labelled: "Journey arranged".(?)
His DFM award here.

I'll get to the post-war awards later on.. Whether or not you think they were adequately recognised is another story! Some were - many weren't.

Glad you're enjoying George's story..
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 18:22
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Flight Reference Cards - when did they start?

This is a great thread, which I have used for several bits of research. Now I have a question about Flight Reference Cards/checklists. When did they come into use in the RAF?

They are hard to find online, but I have one from a 1963 Jet Provost T. I'm sure that is not the oldest one, it's just the oldest one I have found.

I would be eager for any information on how checklists (to use the American term) were written and used at different times. The reward, such as it is, is a footnote in my book. See other questions below.

Related question: Were cockpit drills during the war entirely from memory, or did crew ever carry written versions of them, in the cockpit? The Americans sometimes put them on placards, but I have not found pictures of RAF aircraft with them.

Thanks much! You can also email me at Rbohn at... UCSD ... edu

Here is what I have figured out so far:
  • American checklists I have traced back to 1935, and they were in wide use by 1939. But the RAF version during WW II seems to have been only very brief "drills".
  • I have found a very few one page "drill summaries" from 1945 - typically as an insert in the middle of Pilot's Notes. From the format, my guess is that they were meant to be torn out and kept in the cockpit. Does anyone know?
  • Then starting the late 1940s, the first few pages of Pilot's Notes contain much longer and more complete check lists, totaling more than 100 items and broken up in categories like "Checks after landing." It looks like these were not meant to be carried onboard.
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 19:27
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Regarding Peter Jezzard he was lost on the 5th April, 1948. The aircraft was Wellington X RP504, 1 ANS, and was on a navigation cross-country exercise. Also lost was Pilot John Owen Davies and Navigator George Thomas Lowe.
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 19:43
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RAF Escaping Society......

......didn't there used to be such an organisation? I seem to remember a chap at St Mawgan who was involved in it. He used to pop over to France every now and again on various reunions.

The Ancient Mariner
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 19:59
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Flight Reference cards started to appear when the Pilot's Notes and Aircrew Manuals became too big to put in ones flying overalls pockets. Up to then there were only the compact Pilot's Notes which were used to jog the memory.

As a guide here is a page from the Halifax III Pilot's Notes.
Attached Images
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 20:45
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Shrikered :-
Flight Reference Cards/checklists. When did they come into use in the RAF?
The 3rd Edition Pilots Notes (AL1 incorp. May 1960) for the Hastings C Mk1 (Hercules 216 engines) has a pocket in the rear cover for the FRCs, issue 1 of which was dated May 1962 and issued with AL3 incorp April 1963. So it would appear for that type FRCs were planned for in 1960 at least and issued for type in 1963. Mk1s fitted with 206 engines continued to use the old 2nd edition PNs, I suspect they were in the old format (green manila covers, no FRCs), but only a guess.

Similarly, Issue 1 FRCs for the Chipmunk T Mk10 were dated June 1963.

In contrast, PNs for the Varsity T1 were in the old familiar green soft covers and were still in that form for AL2 dated March 1962. No FRCs, and the Vital Action Check Lists on the rear cover (with a stuck on 1" paper amendment added by AL2). That format of course dated back to WWII at least, as per FED's Halifax III PNs. Hope that helps?

sidevalve, George continues to be lucky as he starts on down that long and winding road to Gibraltar and home. With his writing skills he should have written for a living, but I guess that Training Captains in BA earned "an elegant sufficiency" anyway!
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 21:00
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Pete Jezzard

sidevalve.

Thanks for information re loss of Pete's aircraft. I look forward to reading more of the escape line.

Goofer 3

Thanks for info regarding Wellington RP504. I flew in that aircraft on a number of occasions. I was also friendly with the pilot Johnny Davies and was a part of his crew on a few flights.
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 21:40
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Originally Posted by Rossian
......didn't there used to be such an organisation? I seem to remember a chap at St Mawgan who was involved in it. He used to pop over to France every now and again on various reunions.

The Ancient Mariner
THE RAF Escaping Society was wound up in 1995 I believe..
sv
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 22:19
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Sidevalve thanks.....

......I've just remembered the name of the chap. I wonder if he's still around.

The Ancient Mariner
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Old 24th Jul 2017, 22:20
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A couple or so years ago the question was raised as to why US entrants to the Number 1 BFTS school in Terrell, Texas, had already received some flying training prior to entry.

The answer is provided by Tom Killebrew in his book " The Royal Air Force in Texas: Training British Pilots in Terrell during World War II. " at page 106.

The US Army had been previously critical of the standard of some of those selected by the Royal Air Force for training at the BFTS Schools in the USA. At a very senior level in the US Army it was decided that now that the boot was on the other foot, especial care had to be taken to ensure that only suitable US entrants were selected for training on these courses and therefore those being considered for selection had to have prior flying experience. On number 16 Course, one US entrant was a qualified commercial pilot and a second, a qualified instructor.
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 00:04
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Further to my posts #11049 and #11055 above - "After I'd painted it (with a 3-ins paintbrush!) it looked much better - and no XX's on the windows!"

This is a listing with photos of where I used my VHF/DF skills in the RAF between 1951 and 1959.

5 FTS RAF Thornhill 1951 - 1953



Thornhill VHF/DF Homer




After being hit by a Harvard that drifted on a night take-off. Aircraft survived with a dent in it's wing whilst the VHF/DF operator was shocked, but unhurt.




Temporary VHF/DF station flown down from Fayid in the Canal Zone

Silverstead Fixer near RAF Biggin Hill 1953 - 1956







No free milk!


RAF Bovingdon 1956







No photo of the RV105 that was used to provide cross-bearings to aircraft on approach to RAF North Weald, but it was on the airfield just visible where the arrow points to it.






Bovindon ATC had a CR/DF just off the airfield with a repeater in the tower. This is in the CR/DF building.

RAF Negombo and RAF China Bay 1956 - 1957






RAF Negombo






RAF China Bay with Sunderland taking-off on patrol

RAF Gan 1958












RAF Gan with RV105 before, during and after a bit of TLC!

RAF Abingdon 1959





RAF Abingdon with RV105 which provided cross-bearings to aircraft on approach to RAF Benson.
This was my last posting as a RT VHF/DF operator as in late 1959 I remustered as an AQM (Loadmaster) and joined 99 Squadron at RAF Lyneham.

Last edited by Warmtoast; 25th Jul 2017 at 11:55.
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 09:30
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Hope this works.

https://www.facebook.com/BBCSouthTod...7086587048596/

Mary Ellis, Master Pilot, from the BBC via Facebook. I have no idea how old this clip is but it should be seen.

oops, just noticed it is from Nov, 2016.

Leaving it up because it is an achievement that should be celebrated.

Last edited by seafury45; 25th Jul 2017 at 09:34. Reason: new info
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 14:27
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roving (#11074),

This is very interesting. The six BFTS were set up at the same time (mid-1941) as the all-USAAC "Arnold Scheme" Schools, to which I (and 7,884) other LACs were sent for training (up to 1943, but the BFTS continued to the end). We got 4,493 pilots back (the washout rate of 43% was horrendous).

We already knew (there is a lot on this Thread about this around Page 114 et seq) that the BFTS were required to take 10% USAAC Cadets in their intake (obviously for the purpose of comparison of the training syllabi). But the explanation of their "flying start" may be:

From my old "Arnold" File:

"This article has been taken from the "Air 41" History of BFTSs in USA held in the Public Records Office, Kew Gardens, London"....

..."The six BFTSs were, with opening dates:
1 BFTS Terrell, Texas 9 June 1941 *
2 BFTS Lancaster, California 9 June 1941 *
3 BFTS Miami. Oklahoma 16 June 1941 *
4 BFTS Mesa, Arizona 16 June 1941 *
5 BFTS Clewiston, Florida 17 July 1941 *
6 BFTS Ponca City, Oklahoma 23 August 1941
7 BFTS Sweetwater, Texas May 1942 but closed August 1942

* All but No. 6 started their training at other bases until their permanent bases were opened in July/August 1941" ....

Danny42C.
 
Old 25th Jul 2017, 14:38
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seafury45 (#11076),

Speaking as one who would not be seen dead on Facebook, and if it is not too long, and it is not too much trouble, could you please put it up here so we all can see it ?

Danny42C.
 
Old 25th Jul 2017, 15:26
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Danny42C (#11078)

I don't know how to post it here. Perhaps someone else in the crew room could manage it.

The clip originally came from "BBC South Today" so you may find it on their site. The clip opens with a brief view of a Blenheim Mk I then goes on to interview Mary about her service in the ATA and the award of a Master Pilots Certificate to her.
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 17:31
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We are indebted to The Times for the obituary of David Mattingley, DFC, bomber pilot, who was born on June 14, 1922, and died in his sleep on June 2, 2017, aged 94.

On November 29, 1944, flying Lancaster D DOG from 625 Squadron, Flying Officer Mattingley took off from RAF Kelstern, near Louth in Lincolnshire, to bomb Dortmund in Germany. Seconds after dropping its payload the aircraft was hit by flak. “It blew out all the Perspex of the cockpits, blew up some of the instruments, holed a petrol tank, peppered the fuselage with holes, and me too,” Mattingley said in 2007.

Shrapnel entered his right leg and his right shoulder. The tendons and artery in his right hand were severed, his skull was fractured and he momentarily lost consciousness. His bloody hand was being bandaged by a crewmate when he was hit again in the right knee, thigh and shoulder. Refusing morphine because he feared that it would dull his reflexes, Mattingley pressed on and was hit again over the Rhine.

Because of Mattingley’s crippled right arm, Sgt Cyril Bailey, his flight engineer, operated the throttles as the Lancaster limped home. They made it to the Channel and then to Britain, where Mattingley asked each of his crew if they wanted to bale out rather than risk a crash landing. They stayed. As they neared Kelstern he called to advise that there were wounded aboard, but didn’t say that he was one of them. He landed his aircraft safely but the Dortmund raid was Mattingley’s 23rd and final mission. His wounds had rendered him unfit for active service. He was immediately awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the citation reading: “His indomitable spirit, superb captaincy and outstanding devotion to duty set an example of high order.” Bailey was awarded the DFM.

Cecil David Mattingley was born in Launceston, Tasmania, in 1922, the son of a dentist. Enlisting as a pilot with the Royal Australian Air Force at the age of 19, was posted to Britain and joined 625 Squadron. By the time Mattingley was released from hospital the war in Europe was ending. He was in and out of hospital for the remainder of his life and, despite attention from the finest of surgeons, the pianist and church organist never played again. He returned to his native Tasmania, where he met Christobel at the University of Tasmania’s dramatic society. They were married and moved to Adelaide, where they raised three children. When asked recently how he felt about Germany, Mattingley replied simply: “It was the Nazis, not the German people, who were the enemy.” Later he visited Germany many times, and he counted many German people among his best friends.

He taught English and modern European history at Prince Alfred College, Adelaide, for more than 30 years, where he was known as Dink. Being headmaster would deny him his love of teaching, so the school created the position of senior master for him. Most of the school had no idea about his wartime service, nor had many people in his community, and he would quietly shut down any questions about it. However, his story, Battle Order 204, was published by Christobel, an author of some repute, in the last decade of his life.

The Times article can be found at https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/d...548fd10477b5f2

Last edited by Geriaviator; 25th Jul 2017 at 17:58.
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 17:35
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For the Facebook film, try https://www.facebook.com/BBCSouthTod...7086587048596/
This does not imply that I have any connection with Facebook
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