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Class 1 Initial - referred to psychiatrist!

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Class 1 Initial - referred to psychiatrist!

Old 16th Aug 2019, 16:10
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Join Date: Aug 2019
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Class 1 Initial - referred to psychiatrist!

Hi all,

First post here so apologies if I've made an error somewhere.

I went for my Class 1 Initial a couple of weeks ago and took along my GP record. On the record it made note of a diagnosis of IBS I had several years ago, and it also say "anxiousness re? IBS". I was told my the AME that I must visit a gastroenterologist and psychiatrist for reports. A little surprised by this but didn't question it. Went to see a gastroenterologist and he wrote me a report, all good there. I never recall any issues whatsoever with anxiousness or anxiety so contacted my GP. They wrote to me to say these are so called 'read codes' and are misleading in the sense that they do not give a diagnosis but are categories GP's use when writing notes on your file. Now if I go ahead with an evaluation, it will cost me £390 and several weeks.

Are there any ways around this whatsoever as my AME said he could defer it to the CAA but I don't know the implications of this such as time, money?

All advice or experience would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Dan
skydan26 is offline  
Old 17th Aug 2019, 10:01
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Join Date: Jan 2019
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Iíve had to see a psychiatrist too and have ended up seeing one privately (recommended by my AME - £280) then Iíve also had to have another appointment by the CAA direct (£220) Just like yourself, I have recently found some of these ďread codesĒ in my records and even factually incorrect information. I would suggest you ask your GP to write a letter and ask them to send it direct to the CAA (otherwise your AME if they havenít already referred you) Get the GP to advise this was NOT a diagnosis but instead a categorisation which GPís use. DM me if you need anything else! I hope it all goes well. Heads up in time scales, i went for my class 1 in January, weíre now in August and Iím still battling so expect it to take a good while if going via the CAA direct. My psychologist appointment was booked in April for an appointment in August - that was the earliest I could get it!
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Old 17th Aug 2019, 16:42
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I am sorry you have both had issues.

Reading OP's post, it is obvious the GP simply recorded you had abdominal pain and were concerned about it - perhaps because you were worried it was your appendix, perhaps because you had read IBS was difficult to treat. I normally write on the first line of my consultation notes either 'presented with.....' or 'complaining of.....' but your GP used the words 'anxious about.....' In plain english all three mean the same and do not reflect on the mental health of the patient.

Who knows what the GP interpreted on a 10 minute consultation years before. I have never heard of 'read codes' and suspect the surgery was merely trying to say that is the way doctors write. That is true. It is also true that most GPs have no clue about how the CAA works or the effect of one word in pages of notes.

This has been discussed many times on this board. I really would advise against taking your GP notes or any other data to an examination. It is not required. You could have truthfully answered 'no' to the question about mental health issues, and if your GP had been asked (and he would not have been) he too would have said 'no'. Sadly this one word is a red flag and you will not dissuade the CAA from this silly process. I doubt a letter from your GP will do anything except delay the process further.

Hopefully the psychiatrist will have a modicum of common sense and send you on your way with a clean bill of health.
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Old 17th Aug 2019, 16:48
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Hi Radgirl Thank you for your advice.

I wish I didn't take my GP notes now but when I booked the appointment they told me I should. I didn't want to have any complications on the day of the medical so took it.

It sad to see that common sense won't prevail here and a letter from my GP saying it was misleading isn't taken into account. Would you recommend I just go ahead with the psychiatric evaluation, or challenge it via the CAA hoping they would take a common sense approach to this? Sounds like this isn't the first time they are seeing something similar. Time wise this is going to really set me back, whatever option I take.
skydan26 is offline  
Old 19th Aug 2019, 17:02
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look at your PMs
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Old 29th Aug 2019, 11:18
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Hi all,

Just wanted to update you with my situation.

I asked my AME to refer this case to the CAA who very efficiently sent me a letter today explaining that there is no need for a psychiatric review (as was blatantly obvious to the AME), and they enclosed my certificate. Thank goodness that's over with and thank you all for your help.

Dan
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Old 29th Aug 2019, 19:38
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Originally Posted by Radgirl View Post
I am sorry you have both had issues.

Reading OP's post, it is obvious the GP simply recorded you had abdominal pain and were concerned about it - perhaps because you were worried it was your appendix, perhaps because you had read IBS was difficult to treat. I normally write on the first line of my consultation notes either 'presented with.....' or 'complaining of.....' but your GP used the words 'anxious about.....' In plain english all three mean the same and do not reflect on the mental health of the patient.

Who knows what the GP interpreted on a 10 minute consultation years before. I have never heard of 'read codes' and suspect the surgery was merely trying to say that is the way doctors write. That is true. It is also true that most GPs have no clue about how the CAA works or the effect of one word in pages of notes.

This has been discussed many times on this board. I really would advise against taking your GP notes or any other data to an examination. It is not required. You could have truthfully answered 'no' to the question about mental health issues, and if your GP had been asked (and he would not have been) he too would have said 'no'. Sadly this one word is a red flag and you will not dissuade the CAA from this silly process. I doubt a letter from your GP will do anything except delay the process further.

Hopefully the psychiatrist will have a modicum of common sense and send you on your way with a clean bill of health.
Thank you
Paulinos is offline  
Old 30th Aug 2019, 01:00
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Join Date: Apr 2008
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And now that they've stopped making a fuss about your state of mind, your anxiety level has returned to normal!
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Old 30th Aug 2019, 12:21
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Join Date: Jul 2013
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So glad someone at the CAA found the common sense button
Radgirl is offline  

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