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VISION THREAD (other than colour vision) 2

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VISION THREAD (other than colour vision) 2

Old 30th Aug 2016, 16:34
  #261 (permalink)  
 
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Class 1 Medical Eyesight Question

Hello all - does anyone know if the eyesight requirements for new Class 1 certificates relate to a contact lense prescription or glasses prescription ?

According to the CAA, for short sightedness, the maximum allowable correction is -6.0. I wear lenses 90% of the time and my prescription is bang on the number of -6.0. However, if I look at my glass prescription it's -6.50.

I'll be contacting an eye examiner to confirm before I do anything, however, thought I'd check here to see if anyone has been in or heard of a similar situation. Other than being short sighted my eyes are perfectly healthy.

Thanks in advance....
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Old 31st Aug 2016, 16:01
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Any corrective lenses are supposed to be fine! Just gets noted should be worn, which sounds exactly the same as me unfortunately. Glasses suck!
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Old 31st Aug 2016, 16:28
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As far as I know, there are no myopia limits anymore. There are no pre-operative limits anymore either.
As long as you attain a 7/10 corrected visual acuity monocularly and 10/10 corrected visual acuity binocularly you are fit to fly.

Do not worry and go there relaxed. Go there with glasses rather than contacts and if possible a report from your ophthalmologist – I did not have one on my initial but it was not a problem.

I am assuming you are talking about EASA. FAA requisites are even more relaxed.
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Old 31st Aug 2016, 18:35
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It refers to spectacle correction.

Its all here. Including a very handy excel spreadsheet.

https://www.caa.co.uk/Aeromedical-Ex...e-material-GM/
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Old 31st Aug 2016, 18:41
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I am sure that as long as he attains the minimum corrected visual acuity he will be alright. I was concerned about my astigmatism that is 3 dioptres (the limit is 2) and I was issued a Class 1 after having read the letters on the Snellen chart.

Last edited by RedBullGaveMeWings; 31st Aug 2016 at 18:58.
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Old 1st Sep 2016, 13:49
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Presbyteria and spectacles

I now need to wear glasses for computery stuff, reading and gazing in disbelief at the fuel gauges.

Do any other pilots (Professionals or GA's, I'm not proud) have any recommendations for prescription Ray-Bans or similar? A quick search on-line shows no websites that look reputable for this. There must be someone who specialises in making us look like the heroes we aspire to be.

Wouldn't mind a pair with clear lenses as well, for reading the sunday papers while waiting for the weather to clear.

As ever, any advice and help gratefully received.
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Old 6th Sep 2016, 12:29
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rxsport

rxsport.co.uk look to be what I was looking for.

Bit of a not-all-that-ergonomic website, but I can get prescription, non-polarised lenses in a Ray-Ban frame - jsut what I was looking for.
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 03:52
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Progressive glasses

Apologies re. the wrong forum - not sure what else suits.

Been short sighted for years, and now things are going blurry close up.

Interested in opinions between bifocals or progressives for airline flying. I'm advised the bifocals have a better field of vision?

Any information much appreciated.
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 13:03
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Had reading glasses for a few years now for reading maps and stuff. Noticed however that instruments where getting blurry as well, especially at night. Found myself flying with reading glasses on the tip of my nose.

Decided on varifocals about 4 weeks ago and pretty happy with them. Takes a while to get used to them but love them now.

Tips if you decide on varifocals, don't go cheap! I took the varilux S2 which apparently are about the best out there.
Have the glasses large enough! My ego got the best of me and I bought these small rimless glasses, I also put them in my ray ban wayfarers, which are large and found that the wayfarers are actually even better.

Go to a good optician and explain what you need!

Good luck!
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 14:45
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At the grand old age of 42 I found I was using my iPhone light to read the menu in dark restaurants and even though most people don't need reading glasses until around 45, I ended up getting my first pair of progressives.

They take a bit of getting used to as you now need to move your head around to find the sweet spot but it becomes second nature fairly quickly. The only thing I dislike is when I look at the overhead panel. It requires me to tilt my head all the way back and can be a pain in the neck, literally.

I started out with rodenstock lenses and they were outstanding. I'm now using varilux lenses and they're not as good. I need to move my head around more. If you can get rodenstock lenses, I'd recommend it. They're not cheap but you'll notice the difference between a cheap lens and an expensive one.

VG, I just noticed you're in Sydney. I got my progressives from the following place in the Dymocks Building. Can't recommend them enough and they do rodenstock lenses. They'll take the time to discuss the various options and cost.

http://johndellamartaoptometrists.com.au

Last edited by Kenny; 17th Nov 2016 at 15:05. Reason: Additional info
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 15:41
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Varifocals should be banned for pilots! I've recently spent a fortune on these vision distorting lenses on recommendation of my AME..they are totally unsuitable for avaition use. Peripheral vision is non existent, you have to turn your head to get get a clear view..ridiculous. Go for Bifocals, the lower section can be prescribed for map reading distance and the upper main section for the instrument panel. In my case I look over the top for long range/ landing.
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 15:58
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In the cockpit of an airliner, the reduction in field of view is not an issue, because you are enclosed by all the structure, and you are normally focused on a small area anyhow.

I usually wear regular trifocals, but use progressives in the cockpit (744). I much prefer them, because the lines of the trifocals are distracting in the enclosed environment. For ALL other uses (including driving, where I REALLY rely on my peripheral vision), I wear the trifocals.

As you will note here, not all people like progressive lenses, for various reasons. It is a VERY personal decision. Some people just cannot adapt to them. For that reason, most opticians (at least in the US) will refund your money or make you a pair of trifocals if you cannot adapt to the progressives.

Last edited by Intruder; 18th Nov 2016 at 06:00.
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 16:25
  #273 (permalink)  
 
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I disagree, I use my peripheral vision constantly in the flightdeck.
To focus on one area encourages tunnel vision. What's the point of the AME doing those peripheral vision tests during your recurrent medical if they're not required!
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 16:58
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For what it's worth, I used bifocals when I was flying with the cut-off aligning with the glare-shield when looking comfortably ahead. Now, long after I have retired, I have varifocals - they are very good except when I need to be aware of my spacial awareness, like climbing ladders, etc. I don't know whether this is relevant in the cockpit environment but I resisted wearing varifocals when I was flying so that I would not grab the wrong switch when reaching out near my peripheral vision.
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 17:39
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I use varifocals in the 737 and my L18c, so much better than lenses for distance and glasses for reading plates, as has been said before don't go cheap and ensure the frames are big enough.
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 17:47
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Interesting study done by the USAF regarding PAL's versus bifocals.

http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a279698.pdf
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Old 17th Nov 2016, 21:11
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I've been using progressive lenses for about 10 years. I concur with Kenny regarding the overhead panel, but I'm used to it. I explained to the doc that I needed to focus on four distances: the approach chart, the instrument panel, the first officer's instrument panel, and the runway at decision height. I need correction for all four.

The progressives do fine. I don't even think about them anymore. As far as peripheral vision, I've never noticed an issue. I do know that at altitude on a clear day, if I move my eyes too quickly to the left, the floater in my left eye does one hell of a good imitation of a large jet barely passing over the left wing at a supersonic closure rate...and in the hotel, the floater in my right eye has been known to create the impression of a large spider crawling across the sheet. Both very momentary illusions, but useful for clearing one's arteries nonetheless!
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Old 18th Nov 2016, 02:01
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Ladies and gents

Thank you all for the very informative gen.

Much appreciated
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Old 18th Nov 2016, 04:20
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Go the trifocals. Distance, Instrument Panel and reading.
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Old 18th Nov 2016, 09:06
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I find the line on bifocals annoying and distracting. I prefer progressives, however they can take some getting used to. Get the best lenses you can, there is a noticable difference especially in the peripheral vision.
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