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British Airways Future Pilot Programme.

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British Airways Future Pilot Programme.

Old 21st Oct 2013, 08:28
  #1101 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Gran Bretaña
Posts: 141
ETflyer, or perhaps a different assessor looked over the application and thought more of it than the initial assessor? Whether it's BA or the FTOs who are vetting the applicants, surely there's got to be a team of people doing it, and thus a level of subjectivity. Perhaps the first time it was assessed immediately after a really strong application, and the second after a particularly poor one, making it look better or worse by comparison. Who knows? I've got no idea precisely how they do it, but it would seem that having two different outcomes for the same application doesn't prove things in either direction, especially considering that the questions don't require yes/no answers.

Ps. You may, of course, be right...but that example doesn't necessarily prove it!

Last edited by MaydayMaydayMayday; 21st Oct 2013 at 08:32.
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 09:06
  #1102 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 10,823
I doud't very much if BA gets involved until the last stage. The whole point of outsourcing is so they don't have to commit huge amounts of resources to the whole thing. The sifting of the initial applications is a huge task.

I suspect there is an initial computer sweep through to weed out those that don't meet the min education, right to work etc. Then it will be into the schools to see what's left. The it will be human opinion if you get through to the next stage.

The schools will only be able to process through to the next stage x number of people. So the standard required through to the next stage will vary between schools depending on the quality of the bulk that apply to them.

There is so many variables which can come into personal choice with a lot to do with the person reading the application. I know that when I read a CV rugby players and military service stand out to me. Football has the opposite effect.

So there will be a base line of what they are looking for, but there will be an element of luck of who your CV lands in front of.
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 10:26
  #1103 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 394
know that when I read a CV rugby players and military service stand out to me. Football has the opposite effect.
I can relate to this. When recruiting you're technically supposed to be impartial (more or less) to this type of thing. But we wouldn't be human if it didn't effect us to some degree (even if subconciously). Whenever I think of an applicant who is a footballer I automatically recall hearing footballers giving post-match interviews along the lines of "We done good out there, proud of the boys workrate; 110%. Just didnae get the baw in the back of the net." And the thought of interviewing someone who is that articulate just doesn't really appeal to me. But then I snap myself out of that mindset and try to be impartial. But could I honestly say that person then has an equal bite at the cherry? Probably not. They might come into an interview and impress me, but they'd likely start off with a disadvantage over someone else. Most recruitment - irrespective of where it is - involves an element of the above. Be under no illusions, it'll be the same at BA.
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 11:59
  #1104 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 10,823
Well its not really that with me.

Its the thought of having to share crew accom with football on the telly every night.

But saying that someone saying they were a coach for a junior team or Referee I would see as a plus point.

Maybe the people applying should do a bit of research into the type of people at the various schools who will be looking at the applications. Youngsters they will not be, ex-military, rugby players, like a bit of jazz or classical, maybe have disabled kids or grand kids. Its all about standing out from the crowd for good reasons. Football you may be lucky with but it hardly stands out from the crowd.
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 12:18
  #1105 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Over the moon
Age: 29
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maybe have disabled kids or grand kids.
A truly harrowing way of "standing out from the crowd".
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 12:28
  #1106 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 640
As BA is so competitive, there’s sometimes a feeling that you need to be superman. You don’t. Equally, they don’t necessarily want the geek that’s been plane spotting since age 10 every weekend but done nothing else.

Consequently, I would encourage people to be professional, write achievements in a positive light and be themselves.

If there’s one thing worse than applying, it would be having to select cadets from the many good candidates.
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 15:31
  #1107 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 10,823
Not really if you have given up your time to help with disabled organisations. Something DofE and scouting promotes.

It certainly wasn`t something unusal on a CV from my peer group
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 15:45
  #1108 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 16
About you, 'you will need...'

Afternoon all.
My question is reference the A Level requirements. My circumstances; I flew solo (C152) a matter of days after my 16th birthday, following this I obtained P.P.L. (C152 / 172SP) 1 day after 17th birthday. I am in Upper 6th (Year 14) at local Grammar School, studying A Levels. This leads me to ask; is it necessary to HOLD A Levels at the time of application? I should note that I am aware of another airline cadet scheme where there was no mention of holding A Levels, hence (slight) confusion.
Any advice gratefully received.

Last edited by NathanJohnston; 21st Oct 2013 at 16:03.
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 15:54
  #1109 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Gran Bretaña
Posts: 141
Unfortunately, I think the "predicted grades are not acceptable" statement answers your question, going on the assumption that it remains the same as the current site info.

Last edited by MaydayMaydayMayday; 22nd Oct 2013 at 00:01.
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 23:39
  #1110 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: I have made this up
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Here's a question about the unspoken pre-requisites that maybe only someone already on the course can answer.

If you're an older person, and I am, but you're not married and don't have any children, is that likely to severely disadvantage you as it does in the wider world of business?

Someone might also suggest what kind of flying interest and enthusiasm you need to display? From the Cathay application website it looks like they're only interested in all round wing commanders, or at least expect you to be a member of every aviation and flying club within fifty miles.
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Old 22nd Oct 2013, 08:16
  #1111 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 16
Thank you for help / confirmation. Think it will wait for next year then
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Old 22nd Oct 2013, 14:10
  #1112 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: UK
Posts: 20
BA's cadet scheme is open to people up to the age of 55 so being older won't go against you, unless you are over 55

However, it was recently suggested to me that BA are seen to open applications to older candidates as a "nod" to equal ops and statistics, and that the reality is that you probably are disadvantaged.

Couple this with the common saying that "airlines want to employ future captains". What is your chance of becoming a captain if you are 55 when you enter training...? Makes me wonder.

I hope that isn't the case.

I got through to the last stage of BA sponsorship, hmmm, about 16 years ago, but that was as far as I got. Since then life has managed to get in the way and at almost 40 (kids have left home) I am now reconsidering visiting my old passion.

So, I would LOVE to hear from people 40+ who have been accepted onto these cadet courses just to prove that in theory it is possible.
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Old 22nd Oct 2013, 18:52
  #1113 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
Location: UK
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Gradual Des: very amusing, although BA require each club within Northern Europe.

Seriously, think about what BA want: Team-players, leaders, good people skills, being able to cope with difficult problems, etc. To pass the course, you'll need to demonstrate you need to have done well in exams (since there's a few), be able to pick yourself up when the going gets tough, motivated, and being able to take feedback. Those people who can DEMONSTRATE they have done these sorts of things is what BA are looking for. People who have done school clubs, been prefects, led school teams and contributed to their schools and Universities will be a better bet to be able to demonstrate those things to BA. (or indeed been in careers where this is evident)

Having had some exposure to flying is a guide: at least if you've had a trial lesson you know you're not scared of it!

So simple when you stand back and think about it.

Last edited by no sponsor; 22nd Oct 2013 at 18:55.
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Old 22nd Oct 2013, 22:31
  #1114 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Bath
Age: 25
Posts: 5
Hi Guys, just a quick question.
So currently I am a CTC Cadet on the standard wings course but would obviously love to get to BA some day!
With the next round of FPP coming up, do you think there would be any chance of me talking to BA to see if I could go straight to stage 3 of the selection process for this FPP coming up, or is it likely I would get refused point blank? I have all the requirements BA have asked for too.
Anyone have an thoughts on if it's worth a shot? Thanks
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Old 23rd Oct 2013, 08:00
  #1115 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 640
It can be debated until the cows come home whether the 55 limit is to please age legislation or not.

I remember not so long ago when people were worrying about being 29 for a 28 age limit!!

The key is that you prepare properly. There will be youngsters with a lot of time available to keep practicing the aptitude tests, whereas if you just wing it on the day because you've got the day job/family etc., you've got no chance.

Even if you're on the line by say 45, that's still 20 years of service and the last thing BA wants is to employ 500 21 year old pilots all retiring in the space of 5 years in 30-40 years' time.

So if you're prepared to dedicate a massive amount of time to the application process - and I'm not talking about visiting PPRuNe or plane spotting - go for it, but if not you're wasting everyone's time.
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Old 23rd Oct 2013, 08:31
  #1116 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 394
braders777:

No. The BA FPP policy has always been that to be eligible for the process you cannot have already commenced an integrated fATPL training course.
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Old 23rd Oct 2013, 09:18
  #1117 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Bath
Age: 25
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G-F0RC3:

Many Thanks for your response. Is that specified on the BAFPP website? Thanks for letting me know anyhow so I'm not wasting my time, I will just apply to the Direct Entry Scheme later in the future!
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Old 23rd Oct 2013, 10:39
  #1118 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: UK
Age: 27
Posts: 399
G-F0RC3,

I don't think that's entirely true.

"If you have completed, or are planning to complete, any JAR-FCL Airline Transport Pilot ground school examinations (or EASA equivalents) then you should note that in order to be accepted onto the Future Pilot Programme you must not have already sat any of these exams at the point of commencing training under this programme."


So if you haven't done any of the exams, you're fine. Obviously if you have started an integrated course then you would have to quit it before you sit any of the exams.

Last edited by Bearcat F8F; 23rd Oct 2013 at 10:39.
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Old 23rd Oct 2013, 11:32
  #1119 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: UK
Posts: 394
Perhaps it's slightly misleading then. Under the FAQ section it states:

Do I need to have any flying experience to apply for the Future Pilot Programme?

No. While some flying experience would be valuable, you do not need to have had any experience before you apply to the Future Pilot Programme. However, you must not hold a Commercial Pilot’s Licence or higher, or have commenced an integrated course of flight training, if you wish to apply for the programme.
[embolded is my emphasis]

However, that does seem to contradict what Bearcat has quoted above. Having said that, what has been posted above seems to make more sense to me. Apparently the reason you can't join the programme if you have already sat an ATPL ground exam is because the CAA can't pass you for the same exam more than once. Perhaps it would be a good idea to find out for sure by speaking to the FTO you are currently training at. They might have a good idea of whether others on their integrated course have tried (and been successful) at switching to the BA FPP.
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Old 23rd Oct 2013, 19:20
  #1120 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Bath
Age: 25
Posts: 5
Thanks for the advice guys! Obviously I hope to get there one day, for now then sounds like without forfeiting my place on the course it ain't going to be an option!
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