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R/T licence for Engineers

Old 5th Nov 2019, 16:47
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R/T licence for Engineers

Does anyone know for certain what the rules are with regards to R/T licence for Engineers? I'm thinking in terms of operating the R/T when engine runs are being done. Mostly in the UK but we'd possibly need to do runs in EASA-land in the future.
I have a licence but not many others have one. Is there a 'local alleviation' done by individual airfields or can an abridged course be seen as acceptable?
Thanks
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Old 7th Nov 2019, 11:56
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In the old days a Home office license was required , today it is part of your B1 or B2 license .

So I was told by an old buddy who used to work in the home office .........
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Old 9th Nov 2019, 08:51
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Asked ICAT college but they say it isn't part of the course. The CAA devolved the powers back to OFCOM, who seemed unable to answer any questions on the subject. Nobody there knows anything about the subject, it seems.
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Old 9th Nov 2019, 09:07
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CAP452

This may help.

CAP 452: Aeronautical Radio Station Operator?s Guide

No, I haven't read it.
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Old 9th Nov 2019, 09:23
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ANO 2016

Operation of radio in aircraft
79.—(1) A radio station in an aircraft must not be operated, whether or not the aircraft is in flight, except—

(a)in accordance with the conditions of the licence issued for that station under the law of the country in which the aircraft is registered or the State of the operator; and

(b)by a person duly licensed or otherwise permitted to operate the radio station under that law.
So, there you have it. Somewhere in the depths of small print engineers must be 'permitted'.

Clear as mud, I know.
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Old 9th Nov 2019, 18:20
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The OFCOM docs kinda suggests that a Company in the UK can provide a course to edjumacate an Eng to be safe to run engines, yet doesn't say how. Yup, clear as Mud.
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Old 10th Nov 2019, 21:20
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In Denmark you need an N-JOR certificate which gives the holder the right to communicate to or from aircraft while they are on the ground, on bands over 30 MHz. Based on BL6-03 from the danish CAA.
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Old 11th Nov 2019, 06:32
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Sounds like a sensible Danish solution. Not much point teaching a ground Eng how to get Oceanic Clearances etc. Still no confirmation from the UK OFCOM department.
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Old 11th Nov 2019, 15:28
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Can of Worms

Many years ago, I was asked to clarify this very point. I called the relevant UK government dep’t who took my number and told me they would get back to me. Two hours later they returned my call and said, ‘are you sure you really want to ask that question’.
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Old 13th Nov 2019, 09:10
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I did the very same thing last week, but, they didn't bother to call me back.

Can I assume they were suggesting that you were holding a can opener in one had and a can of worms in the other???
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Old 13th Nov 2019, 19:44
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I believe there is a ‘partial’ licence thats required IF you are giving airfield information to an aircraft - Mainly for use by glider/flying clubs.
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Old 13th Nov 2019, 19:49
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Originally Posted by Rigga View Post
I believe there is a ‘partial’ licence thats required IF you are giving airfield information to an aircraft - Mainly for use by glider/flying clubs.
Here's a thought - If the Engines are off it must be a glider.
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Old 7th Dec 2019, 15:39
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Back in 2010 the AOG team of which I was a member ran into this question, and couldn't get a definitive answer from the CAA. Eventually, to avoid any further confusion, the company decided to pay for us all to go to the local airfield (Ours was in Newtonards, near Belfast) and do the CAA Flight radio Telephony Licence training and exam. Can't remember how much it cost, it wasn't a lot, but it's valid for ten years.
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