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Westjet Encore

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Westjet Encore

Old 10th Nov 2021, 22:09
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Westjet Encore

I see an ad for F/Os. 250 hours ? Nice opportunities for the low time pilots:

https://ca.indeed.com/jobs?q=Westjet...ce=SkyJobs.com

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Old 11th Nov 2021, 22:19
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Does anyone know if 250 hour pilots actually get hired by this company ? There's usually a difference between advertised mins to apply and who actually gets hired.
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 15:48
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This is the first time that Encore has lowered its hiring requirements to 250 hours. Previously it was 1,500 and then 1,000. In each case, pilots with 1,500 hours and 1,000 hours were hired. There is no reason to think that 250-hour pilots will not be hired if that is where the competitive level drops. Naturally, if they have applications from a 250-hour pilot and a 3,000-hour pilot, the 250-hour pilot likely loses out every time - that's why a company shows "desirable qualities or attributes" in their postings. I have it on good authority that the company is in the process of re-designing their initial training program to cater for the lower level of experience (as they did for 1,000-hour pilots). But, because they're only doing that now, it means while they are planning to hire 250 hour pilots, they probably don't expect to hire that level of experience for at least 6 months to a year given that's how long it takes to re-design an initial.
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Old 12th Nov 2021, 22:37
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This is very good news for the Canadian aviation industry and i'm happy to see that the regionals are willing to hire low timers in the future

+TSRA, my question to you is, what are the chances of someone between 500 and 1000 hours getting called before the training program is redesigned to accommodate one with 250 hours? Will it be the same timeline as you mentioned? This is assuming one with between 500 and 1000 hours has 2 crew experience, a decent amount of multi time, etc.
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Old 14th Nov 2021, 18:53
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what are the chances of someone between 500 and 1000 hours getting called before the training program is redesigned to accommodate one with 250 hours?
That'll entirely depend on the market. But I would say pretty slim in the short term. That's because the company still has a number of recalls to train as well as the pilots in the existing pool, so that'll take the company well into the first six months of next year. Once they're out of the way, it'll then depend on the number of more experienced pilots who apply. If the company can hire a 3,000 hour pilot with previous turbo-prop time, that's who they'll hire first. But, who knows. Maybe those 3,000-hour pilots are happy where they are, and the company is hiring 250-hour pilots from April or May 2022. So, if I were in the position of a 250-hour pilot, I'd throw the application in now. The worst thing that happens is they say no, the best thing that happens is they say yes, and there is a better chance than not that they throw your name into a pool.

With that out of the way, I do have some friendly advice as I've seen first-hand how some low-experienced pilots approach the application and training process, and what has caused them to fail in the past:

1. When you apply to any airline job, stay away from phrases such as "decent amount of multi-time." At 1,000 hours total time, you'd have, at most, 750 hours multi, which, frankly, is what you'll fly in one year at an airline. It is hardly a "decent amount" in the grand scheme of things. It is nothing more than blustery language that the hiring teams of the world see right through. Remember that airlines have pilots on their hiring teams, and those pilots know full well what the average level of knowledge and ability is at 1,000 hours. At sub-1,000 hours, there is not much that differentiates pilots, save for those who come up the ranks in the military. So you're better to highlight transferable skills from the other things you've done. For example, if you were in some form of cadet program (air, army, sea) let them know how you've learned to apply your teamwork, leadership, and communication studies. If you were a shift or team lead at another company, expand on how you learned how to manage a team and deal with personality differences, or handle the change a dynamic environment brings. Transferrable skills are what will set you apart from another pilot because unless you have thousands of hours of experience or over 500 hours on type, you cannot rely on your flight time to set you apart.

2. Before you apply, remember that airlines are just that, an airline. They're not a flight school. They will be training you on an aircraft type that is added to your license, but they are not training you for a license. As such, they are allowed to assume that have the minimum knowledge required to hold a CPL, Group 1 Instrument Rating, and the IATRA. They can assume you know your stuff. They'll teach you about advanced aircraft systems, operational IFR, and a little bit about CRM, pilot monitoring, and SOPs, but it will be specific to their airline and the aircraft type. They're not necessarily going to teach you about the basics of aircraft pressurization or remind you about the ways to fly an approach or the difference between controlled and uncontrolled airports. So if you do apply to any commercial operator, especially the airlines, I suggest you keep your studies going strong. Don't let off the brakes. If you do, you'll struggle under any training program, and if they have to let you go from a lack of performance or preparation, you've likely forever closed a door.
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Old 15th Nov 2021, 02:08
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Thank you for the info and advice, I greatly appreciate it

Cheers!
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Old 26th Nov 2021, 00:40
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Does anyone know roughly when the first GS class will be? Likely spring/summer 2022?
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Old 2nd Dec 2021, 21:12
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Does anyone know roughly when the first GS class will be? Likely spring/summer 2022?
That's a pretty good and realistic guess.

Current pool candidates are likely to begin in March and April. From there it will depend on how long their training takes, so non-pooled pilots could expect start dates into probably late May, into June. Of course, that depends on how bad Omicron gets. There is no mention of conducting more layoffs, but new hires may be delayed if it turns out the South Africans are wrong, and this variant is both more transmissible and deadly than Delta was/is. Naturally, that may mean the likes of Encore get busier as people change international travel plans to domestic plans.

Best bet is to get the resume in now and hope for a call. If there is one thing this pandemic has reinforced, it's that if you want to be an airline pilot, get in early because a seniority number is better than gold.
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