Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Worldwide > Canada
Reload this Page >

Foreign pilot, job market in Canada

Canada The great white north. A BIG country with few people and LOTS of aviation.

Foreign pilot, job market in Canada

Reply

Old 29th Jun 2018, 07:57
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Botswana
Posts: 2
Foreign pilot, job market in Canada

Good day all
I was wondering if operators of charter or freight companies in Canada would be interested in hiring expats to fly for them, I have 1800TT and 400 hours on a C208B PIC; I would be looking for a company that flies a C208 with the option of progression onto a twin. I know with all the aviation opportunities in Canada there are probably a lot of nationals that have similar experience. Would operators prefer to get pilots locally or would they be open to hiring expats?
What would the process be, would I have to get a conversion of my ICAO licence first and then look for work while in Canada, or just apply for a job and do that after getting a work permit? I have a British passport and the immigration website says if I have a letter of employment I would be eligible for a work permit, but on PCC listings say you must have the right to live and work in Canada, so would I need to get that first, somehow?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
camtwright is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 30th Jun 2018, 00:45
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Somehwere on the planet
Posts: 373
Most companies will require either a Canadian passport or permanent residency card before offering employment.
tbaylx is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 30th Jun 2018, 18:20
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: BC
Posts: 442
You MUST have the right to work in Canada. You can't 'walk' in here and go flying. There are numerous threads on here about this.
777AV8R is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 8th Jul 2018, 16:34
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Earth
Posts: 76
Why does everyone seem to think Canada is the land of opportunities. Contrary to popular belief immigrating into Canada is pretty difficult, we have a very strict points based system which requires significant higher education to get in. I don't know how that would work if you want to come into Canada as a pilot, but we don't have an open door policy. Despite our land mass we have a very small population.
Foxdeux is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 8th Jul 2018, 17:40
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Alberta
Posts: 19
Originally Posted by Foxdeux View Post
Why does everyone seem to think Canada is the land of opportunities. Contrary to popular belief immigrating into Canada is pretty difficult, we have a very strict points based system which requires significant higher education to get in. I don't know how that would work if you want to come into Canada as a pilot, but we don't have an open door policy. Despite our land mass we have a very small population.
Foxdeux
Your forgetting that they can enter the US on a visitor visa, walk across the border in either Quebec, Ontario or Manitoba and we will welcome them with open arms thanks to Justin. So much for the points system you mentioned because the only ones following that are still waiting to get in.
BKsmithca
Bksmithca is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 8th Jul 2018, 21:37
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Earth
Posts: 76
Originally Posted by Bksmithca View Post
Foxdeux
Your forgetting that they can enter the US on a visitor visa, walk across the border in either Quebec, Ontario or Manitoba and we will welcome them with open arms thanks to Justin. So much for the points system you mentioned because the only ones following that are still waiting to get in.
BKsmithca
That is partly true, it is easy to cross the border as a "refugee" but they still go through a legal process to see if their 'refugee' status is real. But how many of those crossing the border illegally are coming here to become pilots...probably nil. The problem with having illegal immigrants isn't that they are taking jobs from us - they usually end up working in very low paying jobs - it is the strain they put on our welfare system and leap frogging to the front of the line because they are "refugees" is just sad.
Foxdeux is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jul 2018, 01:31
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Alberta
Posts: 19
Originally Posted by Foxdeux View Post
That is partly true, it is easy to cross the border as a "refugee" but they still go through a legal process to see if their 'refugee' status is real. But how many of those crossing the border illegally are coming here to become pilots...probably nil. The problem with having illegal immigrants isn't that they are taking jobs from us - they usually end up working in very low paying jobs - it is the strain they put on our welfare system and leap frogging to the front of the line because they are "refugees" is just sad.
Foxdeux
At this time your 100 percent correct in that the individuals coming across are the less skilled workers and in the points system of immigration they would likely score low on the point count where as a more highly skilled individual scores higher but is currently prevented for coming over because of all the border jumpers that Justin is accepting. I'm sorry if I sound nasty but send them back to the country that they came from and tell them to follow the process.
Bksmithca is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jul 2018, 10:35
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,309
Blksmitha, this says it all, our immigrant mess, thanks to our "glorious leader" is going to take years to fix, if it ever can be sorted out, what a joke Canada has become!
clunckdriver is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12th Jul 2018, 00:29
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: On the screen in front of you
Posts: 53
Originally Posted by clunckdriver View Post
Blksmitha, this says it all, our immigrant mess, thanks to our "glorious leader" is going to take years to fix, if it ever can be sorted out, what a joke Canada has become!

Where's the like button?!
skidbuggy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 27th Jul 2018, 06:45
  #10 (permalink)  
Vio
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Canada
Posts: 5
Considering your experience, and the state of the industry, you would have a very easy time getting a job for a small carrier, even on a twin (King Air, B1900, etc). I only see two real issues:

1. Find a way to obtain the LEGAL RIGHT TO LIVE AND WORK in Canada.
2. Converting your license. (this isn't exactly that hard, but it does cost money)
Vio is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 14th Aug 2018, 04:13
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 197
Originally Posted by 777AV8R View Post
You MUST have the right to work in Canada. You can't 'walk' in here and go flying. There are numerous threads on here about this.

More utter nonsense from Red Neck anti-immigrant Canadians.

This is total nonsense.
You can virtually "walk in" and get a visa over the counter, that's an exaggeration but
at the most difficult, you sign up for a training course, that gives a VISA, and then that is good for two years.
By that time, you will have another way to renew it or get another.

Employers can pay $1000 and get an assessment. That with an offer of employment
will get you a VISA.

Once you are in Canada and a Canadian Citizen, its then a $59 fee at the US border to work
in the USA under what is called a TN Visa....Something the Red Neck Canadians might think about
when looking for greener fields
Ramjet555 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 14th Aug 2018, 04:18
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 197
Originally Posted by Foxdeux View Post
Why does everyone seem to think Canada is the land of opportunities. Contrary to popular belief immigrating into Canada is pretty difficult, we have a very strict points based system which requires significant higher education to get in. I don't know how that would work if you want to come into Canada as a pilot, but we don't have an open door policy. Despite our land mass we have a very small population.
HA Ha Ha,
You have not got a clue about reality.

This is a sick joke.
Just travel from Winnipeg to Vancouver by road, every Tim Hortons or supermarket is FULL of foreigner's who
paid a fee in another country to come to Canada and work in a minimum wage job.

Last night, I was talking to an Indian lady, she paid $20,000 for minimum wage job and just got
landed immigrant status.

From YellowKnife to Toronto, its getting hard to see a white face in a minimum wage job
and they are increasingly just immigrants who paid an "agent" or what ever you want to call em.

Is it right? Hell no. Is it legal ? Yes, there are just too many business interests, corrupt and otherwise
that directly promote this form of immigration.
Ramjet555 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Sep 2018, 14:13
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: in a dirty cockpit
Posts: 393
Hi guys,

I take the opportunity of this thread as I was considering the same as Camtwright.

I'm a B737 Captain in Europe and I've been interested in moving to Canada for many years but never actually got into the process. As I know, and as all of you already said, the hardest point could be obtaining the work permit.

As my father is a USA citizen and can make me have a Green Card, I was wondering if going through a USA-to-Canada application instead of a Europe-to-Canada application would be easier.

I've already checked the Canadian government website and it looks almost impossible to get a permit, so what's the best way of obtaining it? I mean, does a job offer from a Canadian employer (any employer, like restaurants, bars, shops etc.) will make the process smooth enough?
Does any simple training contract with a Flying School (let's say, a license conversion training) provide a good opportunity to switch from a Temporary VISA to a permanent work permit?

Many thanks in advance for your help guys.

Regards

BTS
Breakthesilence is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 9th Sep 2018, 17:06
  #14 (permalink)  
Vio
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Canada
Posts: 5
Originally Posted by Breakthesilence View Post
Hi guys,

I take the opportunity of this thread as I was considering the same as Camtwright.

I'm a B737 Captain in Europe and I've been interested in moving to Canada for many years but never actually got into the process. As I know, and as all of you already said, the hardest point could be obtaining the work permit.

As my father is a USA citizen and can make me have a Green Card, I was wondering if going through a USA-to-Canada application instead of a Europe-to-Canada application would be easier.

I've already checked the Canadian government website and it looks almost impossible to get a permit, so what's the best way of obtaining it? I mean, does a job offer from a Canadian employer (any employer, like restaurants, bars, shops etc.) will make the process smooth enough?
Does any simple training contract with a Flying School (let's say, a license conversion training) provide a good opportunity to switch from a Temporary VISA to a permanent work permit?

Many thanks in advance for your help guys.

Regards

BTS

It is hard man! Canada is not an easy country to come to, unless you come here to study. I think the easiest way (and I said "easiEST" not "EASY") is to come here and study as a student. I have friends that came from Europe to study and after about 2 years they were able to apply for a permanent resident status. Some got it, some didn't. I also came here from Europe, but my parents took the long way around, applying to officially immigrate here based on a "points system". I wasn't even a teenager when we moved here.

It's interesting how people want to move from Europe to Canada and vice versa. I would actually love to move back to Europe and fly there. Even though I have a EU passport, I'm not sure I'm willing to write the (ridiculous) 14 exams to get my Canadian ATPL converted to an EASA ATPL. I would almost be guaranteed a job there, considering my experience here in Canada. I'm just too lazy to write those. I'll do it IF Europe decides to make it easier for us ICAO ATPL holders, with thousands of hours flying at major airlines, to convert our license. I would say one or two exams, to cover the "differences" between the two systems.
Vio is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10th Sep 2018, 05:49
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: in a dirty cockpit
Posts: 393
Originally Posted by Vio View Post
It is hard man! Canada is not an easy country to come to, unless you come here to study. I think the easiest way (and I said "easiEST" not "EASY") is to come here and study as a student. I have friends that came from Europe to study and after about 2 years they were able to apply for a permanent resident status. Some got it, some didn't. I also came here from Europe, but my parents took the long way around, applying to officially immigrate here based on a "points system". I wasn't even a teenager when we moved here.

It's interesting how people want to move from Europe to Canada and vice versa. I would actually love to move back to Europe and fly there. Even though I have a EU passport, I'm not sure I'm willing to write the (ridiculous) 14 exams to get my Canadian ATPL converted to an EASA ATPL. I would almost be guaranteed a job there, considering my experience here in Canada. I'm just too lazy to write those. I'll do it IF Europe decides to make it easier for us ICAO ATPL holders, with thousands of hours flying at major airlines, to convert our license. I would say one or two exams, to cover the "differences" between the two systems.
Thank you so much for your reply

You are right, it's interesting to see this kind of movements (or wishes of movement) between countries. I think that's because people (us too) aren't always happy of what they (we) have and we always look to something new to discover.

Personally, I've always been attracted by the Canadian landscape and wildness and relaxed lifestyle.

Recently (well....it's been a while now) we always read about a "Pilot shortage" in the World. That's only partially true otherwise I can't understand why countries like Canada, Australia, NZ etc. are still so closed to expat pilots.
Breakthesilence is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10th Sep 2018, 07:20
  #16 (permalink)  
Vio
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Canada
Posts: 5
Originally Posted by Breakthesilence View Post
Thank you so much for your reply

You are right, it's interesting to see this kind of movements (or wishes of movement) between countries. I think that's because people (us too) aren't always happy of what they (we) have and we always look to something new to discover.

Personally, I've always been attracted by the Canadian landscape and wildness and relaxed lifestyle.

Recently (well....it's been a while now) we always read about a "Pilot shortage" in the World. That's only partially true otherwise I can't understand why countries like Canada, Australia, NZ etc. are still so closed to expat pilots.
We always want what we don't have. I've flown all over Canada, from East to West, South to North. I've been to every province and territory, including 5 years in the Canadian Arctic. It was great experience flying to places that look like something out of "Game of Thrones". Amazing scenery for sure.

I miss the European culture, food and the variety of cultures you have there. I can drive my car here for 8 hours and still not be in any "big" city, aside from Minneapolis, USA. That would be my reason to move to Europe.

As far as your other question: There is no such thing as pilot shortage. There will always be more pilots than jobs, at least in Canada. You know the pay here is much worse than in Europe, right? The problem is, you can have 10,000 hours flying a 777 in the left seat, if you get a job with a major airline in Canada you'll go right seat. Some of the regional carriers started hiring direct entry captains, but you don't want to work there. MSG me in private. I can give you my e-mail and I can give you some advice there. I don't like to write too much stuff in the forums. I've learned a few things about the Canadian industry.

You canít use the Private Messaging system, add url links or images until you have an established posting history.
Vio is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service