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Airlander breaks up at mooring.

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Airlander breaks up at mooring.

Old 18th Nov 2017, 20:27
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Speaking as SLF, it's a little worrying to wonder what would happen to us passengers if the self-prick (as it were) system kicked in before we'd got out. Would we just be spilled out into the sky along with the luggage?
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 00:46
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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What if the deflation system deployed at altitude?
One presumes itís unlikely to break away from itís moorings Ďat altitudeí???
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 12:21
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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I was sorry to see that this had happened. Can anyone explain the mechanism for deflating and yet retaining the helium? Aka "making it safe". Since helium cannot be manufactured and has to be mined from finite resources, there will be a significant impact from wasting a football pitch cubed worth of helium into the atmosphere unless somehow there is a pressurizing system which is part of the "making safe" procedure. This is no doubt possible but unlikely in the event of an emergency deflation. I'd be happy to be reassured.
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 12:47
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting article here on the availability and production of Helium.

http://www.madehow.com/Volume-4/Helium.html

It's a bit out of date as it states we should have run out of the stuff two years ago!

Artificial manufacture is possible but it's expensive.

Last edited by TURIN; 20th Nov 2017 at 10:16. Reason: Forgot to add the link...
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 14:32
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Link please?

And yes, I remember reading a very cross New Scientist editorial about fifteen years ago that berated the use of helium in party balloons etc., given that the world is running out of it and it's crucially needed for things such as MRI machines and other gadgets that rely on superconductivity.

So when I first read about this event, my first thought was also "what a colossal waste of all that helium".
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 14:40
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by 4468 View Post
One presumes itís unlikely to break away from itís moorings Ďat altitudeí???
No, but there is such a thing in the world as "accidental deployment" and, in the unlikely event that I were to be travelling in one of these things, this would now concern me.
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 14:49
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Fourteen months:
One flight;
Two crashes.

Not quite ready for a stock market flotation, methinks.

Has Allianz computed the new insurance premium yet?

Does there ever come a point when the CAA airworthiness people say "Enough is enough. Stop it!"?
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 15:20
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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What a shame. Two disasters during a flight test programme. Sorry to say, but this must be the end of the road for the project. Perhaps someone will harvest some useful learning, whether about buoyancy, flight test, risk management, business, or listening more intently to history lessons...

The efficacy of oversight from the CAA is one aspect; of course, a thorough investigation into the crash might have uncovered weaknesses there, if one had taken place.
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 16:50
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by oscarisapc View Post
Can anyone explain the mechanism for deflating and yet retaining the helium? Aka "making it safe".
Obviously, if the system tears open the envelope to make the blimp non-buoyant, then helium will be lost. My speculation is that making it safe is reference to compressed helium contained in pressure vessels as a part of on-board buoyancy controls. Anyone know if such exist on the Airlander?
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 17:03
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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If the reports of it committing suicide to prevent it being a danger to the local area, or other air traffic are correct, that's great, but it really doesn't look like a realistic solution.
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 17:14
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by B737C525 View Post
Perhaps someone will harvest some useful learning, whether about buoyancy, flight test, risk management, business, or listening more intently to history lessons...
Good luck with that. People are still trying to invent flying cars despite a half century or so of it having been demonstrated that:

Yes, it is technologically possible.
No, it doesn't make a very good airplane.
No, it doesn't make a very good car.
No, there's not much practical application.
No, it's not a commercially viable device.

Last edited by A Squared; 19th Nov 2017 at 18:32.
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 17:27
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ambient Sheep View Post
Link please?

And yes, I remember reading a very cross New Scientist editorial about fifteen years ago that berated the use of helium in party balloons etc., given that the world is running out of it and it's crucially needed for things such as MRI machines and other gadgets that rely on superconductivity.

So when I first read about this event, my first thought was also "what a colossal waste of all that helium".
on the other hand...

https://newatlas.com/helium-source-n...-fields/39038/
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 17:28
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Once they crack nuclear fusion, there'll be plenty of helium.

Last edited by Super VC-10; 20th Nov 2017 at 14:03. Reason: Correction, as pointed out by Feathers McGraw
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 18:30
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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It's customary for an elegant aircraft's shape to be incorporated into a logo or emblematic image.

The above image shows this anachronistic waste of money to look like a splodge of tuberculotic phlegm.

At first, images of the wretched thing made it look like an arse.

Then they took it outdoors and really made an arse of it.
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 18:31
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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ITYM fusion...
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 20:04
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by oldchina View Post
It's now a limp blimp
Or a flaccid failure
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Old 19th Nov 2017, 20:29
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Once they crack nuclear fission, there'll be plenty of helium.
Ho ho ho. I see what you did there.

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Old 20th Nov 2017, 09:44
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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The gas inside airlander is at very low pressure. There are helium bags and air bags. As the helium bags inflate at altitude the air is let out to keep the outer balloon from bursting. On descending air is pumped into the air bags to keep the ballo
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Old 20th Nov 2017, 09:49
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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... balloon rigid. Iím sure emergency deflation would require venting most, of not alll of the helium and air. I m sure there is no way of compressing it. Imagine the size and weight of the cylinders! I seem to recall from my visit that the cost of the helium to fill it is about £250,000. They reckoned to replace about 10% each year. 😢 I guess they may be covered by insurance.
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Old 20th Nov 2017, 10:26
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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For all of the keyboard warriors questioning the automatic deflation.

It is a regulatory requirement.

Federal Register :: Airworthiness Criteria: Airship Design Criteria for ...
https://www.federalregister.gov/.../...riteria-for-ze...
While the notice was not a notice of a regulatory change or requirement, the FAA is ... LFLS Section 881 (f) and ADC paragraph 4.43 (f)(g) Emergency Deflation .... if the airship tears apart behind the nose section and departs the mooring mast.
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