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Stirling Under Threat

Old 12th Jul 2020, 07:21
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Stirling Under Threat

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-53199977

Hopefully this will be done in a considerate manner. After all, it is possibly a war-grave.

Since there are very few bits of Stirling anywhere, any recovery would soon find a place in a museum very happy to receive it. The RAF Museum please.
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Old 12th Jul 2020, 07:23
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Herod, I thought it was a post about the pound.




Misspelt thread title edited!

SP
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Old 12th Jul 2020, 07:30
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My apologies. The only excuse is it's early on Sunday morning. At least I spelt it correctly in the narrative.
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Old 12th Jul 2020, 07:52
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Short Stirling lost on a raid to Berlin: See here.

The courage and devotion to duty needed to go to Berlin in a Short Stirling in 1943 are remarkable.
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Old 12th Jul 2020, 09:10
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As you say, very brave men, to whom we owe a lot. Hopefully the recovery will be done in a way that allows remains to be recovered and properly honoured.
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Old 12th Jul 2020, 09:11
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Originally Posted by Herod View Post
My apologies. The only excuse is it's early on Sunday morning. At least I spelt it correctly in the narrative.
No problem Herod, the mods have amended. My own great uncle met his end in a Short Stirling. I am always eager to hear any Stirling news.
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Old 12th Jul 2020, 10:02
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Dutch

What I read in the Dutch News from 20 March, I understand that underwater recovery has too much risk due to the possible present ammunition.
More news after the summer.

My personal opinion is that in the Netherlands we handle these recoveries with the upmost respect.
But we may have acted earlier.

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Old 12th Jul 2020, 10:12
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Agreed about underwater recovery, and lifting it with a crane could set anything off. With a coffer-dam, it can be pumped dry, and examined bit by bit.

Yes, the Dutch seem to do these recoveries very well. Let's hope for a successful outcome.
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Old 12th Jul 2020, 10:29
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Originally Posted by Self loading bear View Post
Dutch

What I read in the Dutch News from 20 March, I understand that underwater recovery has too much risk due to the possible present ammunition.
More news after the summer.
I assume you mean bombs possibly still on board (if it went down on the way to target) rather than any 303 ammunition, which surely can't be a serious risk factor to any proper recovery?

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Old 12th Jul 2020, 10:37
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I guess so

edit
i just realized that the cofferdam piles a hammered in...
but has been done before so those risks can be mitigated

Last edited by Self loading bear; 12th Jul 2020 at 12:28.
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Old 12th Jul 2020, 14:56
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Are there any volunteer organizations in the U.K. that could provide financial assistance to the Almere City Council so as to ensure the recovery is done in the best manner possible?

Either the news story is incomplete, or there remains much work to be done before a coffer dam could be constructed. For example, the crash site needs to be surveyed and major wreck portions located. Such a survey would also locate any major ordnance (unexploded bombs) so that those items could be dealt with. I would assume (dangerous, I know) that the recovery efforts will be focused on the fuselage section(s), where crew remains may be found. How deep is Lake Markemeer where the wreck is located?

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Old 12th Jul 2020, 16:42
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The depth of the lake Markermeer is 4-5m.
However the bottom is quite soft.
So all the wreckage will have sunken into the bottom.
surveys must have been performed up to a reasonable level of detail.
otherwise Defense would not have been able to asses the risks.

A likewise recovery with cofferdam has been performed in 2016 for a Wellington.
Costs ran then already into 1 million euro.
Wellington

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Old 13th Jul 2020, 08:57
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Beware of taking media reports as gospel.

The aircraft is in pieces distributed over a wide area, not unexpected from an aircraft shot down in flames. See eg this specialist report. Many parts such as a propeller have been recovered already, with at least one bearing the aircraft’s serial number.

I am sure that the Dutch will take great care to treat any remains with the respect that they deserve. They certainly did so in the recent recovery of Wellington R1322

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Old 13th Jul 2020, 09:48
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You know there is an ongoing project to rebuild on in the UK the cockpit is coming along nicely, see

https://www.key.aero/forum/historic-...project-update
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Old 13th Jul 2020, 14:34
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Originally Posted by VintageEngineer View Post
The aircraft is in pieces distributed over a wide area, not unexpected from an aircraft shot down in flames.
Has it now been confirmed that it was shot down ?

The link in your previous post referred to several possible but unconfirmed scenarios, including being downed by the weather.
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Old 13th Jul 2020, 15:22
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Originally Posted by VintageEngineer View Post
Beware of taking media reports as gospel.

The aircraft is in pieces distributed over a wide area, not unexpected from an aircraft shot down in flames. See eg this specialist report. Many parts such as a propeller have been recovered already, with at least one bearing the aircraft’s serial number.

I am sure that the Dutch will take great care to treat any remains with the respect that they deserve. They certainly did so in the recent recovery of Wellington R1322

If it exploded before impact then the wreckage could be expected to be spread over a wide area.
The fact they are concerned there are bombs/ crew onboard would indicate that it possibly came down intact and there was no explosion, but it broke up on impact.
That impact would of course have led to various parts being spread over the lake bed and although a lake, those parts would still be subject to water movement.
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Old 13th Jul 2020, 20:01
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I agree. Reports are light on detail, so I am speculating. The wreckage seems too close to come from an explosion at height and known Stirling controlled ditchings left the aircraft in one piece, suggesting this one hit out of control. This Stirling crash into the sea has images that may be comparable. We will know more when the aircraft is raised.

The Markermeer has been a shallow lake/reservoir without tides since the crash so the pieces are unlikely to have moved significantly since then.

We may not find all the aircrew as some may have parachuted into the surrounding waters, drowned and being lost without trace.

The aircraft was returning so probably didn’t have bombs on board, there remaining a small probability of a hang-up.

Although I have a particular interest in the Short Stirling, my wife’s first husband being the son of an air gunner killed in one fairly close to where this was found, I’ve taken enough of this thread so will sign off now. Thanks for reading.
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Old 13th Jul 2020, 21:05
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Originally Posted by 66 and retired View Post
Surely this aircraft’s remains are subject to the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986. Why is it being disturbed?
In the Netherlands we have a similar law.
War graves are in principle untouched.
Local authorities can decide to do a recovery:
- in case of danger (unexploded bombs)
- repurpose of the land
- on request of relatives of deceased.
The last is the case for this Stirling.

In 2019 the Dutch government has reserved 15M euro to reimburse the local authorities for the costs made to recover 50-60 of the sites which most likely will still contain human remains.
Roughly 3-5 sites can be recovered per year.

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Old 14th Jul 2020, 12:18
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Originally Posted by Self loading bear View Post
In 2019 the Dutch government has reserved 15M euro to reimburse the local authorities for the costs made to recover 50-60 of the sites which most likely will still contain human remains.
Roughly 3-5 sites can be recovered per year.
Shouldn't the UK government be contributing to the cost when recovering a RAF crew?
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Old 15th Jul 2020, 04:10
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In the Netherlands we have a similar law.
War graves are in principle untouched.
Similar in Oz, we have a Japanese sub in fairly shallow water that still has the entire crew entombed.
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