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Qantas stand down 20,000 employees till end of May

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Qantas stand down 20,000 employees till end of May

Old 22nd Mar 2020, 11:07
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Originally Posted by Asturias56 View Post
There is no vaccine, there is no medical treatment that cures or stops the virus. Isolation is the only known effective action

It worked in China & in Korea and its slowing the spread in places like the Singapore, UK and Germany - what don't you understand?

Except Australia, or should I say Australians, are only taking half measures at isolation. The economy is suffering and for what? Either we all take this seriously (which a lot of people are still not doing, why I have no idea) and take the necessary measures, or we don't and let the economy recover.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 11:27
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Originally Posted by Icarus2001 View Post
I did wonder when sitting in a 100 seat jet flying to a mine site would be deemed as undesireable as sitting in the fresh air at Bondi beach. Or going to your local pub, cafe etc. So are the mines going into care and maintenance?
From what was seen yes. I’m not directly involved just watched the press conference and so far there’s been nothing in the media from what I’ve seen.
I did think it would come to this, I was surprised to find it was ‘ops normal’ at network last I asked.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 13:25
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All states are about to put border restrictions on, domestic flights will basically cease except for some skeleton flights circa a few percent of current capacity. This won’t last a few months it will go into early next year at best. International? meh! Won’t be happening until mid next year in any real form.

And if you look at the finances QF can probably survive until end of this year at best then it’s bailout or collapse.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 13:34
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On a positive note, all places of worship are closed as of midday 23 March. About time! Maybe Scomo will also take their untaxed wealth and use that money to help prop up the country? Then when the crisis has passed, don’t let them reopen their doors! Imagine that, Scomo the modern day Robin Hood. He would get more votes next election than one thought possible.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 13:34
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I think your timeline is a bit exaggerated. Maybe a few months at worst
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 13:37
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Originally Posted by morno View Post
I think your timeline is a bit exaggerated. Maybe a few months at worst

I would suggest we are looking at least 6 months. And then travel will be very restricted .. because everyone will be scared of flare ups
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 13:38
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Originally Posted by morno View Post
I think your timeline is a bit exaggerated. Maybe a few months at worst
k Morno...lol
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 14:06
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It seems to be 3 months from early cases back to few cases based on China, Korea and even Iran is seeing a drop /slow down. THE question is the one of a second wave - if it doesn't happen we should be opening up from June/July - a second wave and all bets are off until there is either a jab or everyone has had it.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 14:25
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We just cancelled two business class returns to Europe, train in germany, car hire for six weeks, accomodation in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia, four overnight ferries, yacht charter for two weeks in Croatia, a week in venice, sicily and elsewhere, two Vietnam domestic flights and a week in Nha Trang. Now multiply by tens of thousands of similar vacations and you get a picture of the impact of this bug.


Even if a miracle cure was found tomorrow, it’s going to take a year to get back to “normal”. If there is such a thing.....
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 16:21
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They’ve just answered that.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 22:59
  #191 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Paragraph377 View Post
On a positive note, all places of worship are closed as of midday 23 March. About time! Maybe Scomo will also take their untaxed wealth and use that money to help prop up the country? Then when the crisis has passed, don’t let them reopen their doors! Imagine that, Scomo the modern day Robin Hood. He would get more votes next election than one thought possible.
You’re allowing your anti-religion bias to show.

Most churches closed for worship before 23 March- certainly Sydney Anglicans didn’t hold face to face services yesterday. Majority of churches had video links up and going. That will be unchanged moving forward.

A number of churches have volunteers and paid workers in the community assisting those who are required to self-isolate. That workload will only increase now with restrictions on other businesses. This is on top of the ‘normal’ workload assisting a number of vulnerable people in our community.

‘Untaxed wealth’. Lol. You obviously don’t know a whole lot about how most church finances are set up.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 23:02
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tens of thousands of similar vacations
I don't think there would be 10 of thousands of similar vacations to that.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 23:06
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Originally Posted by Sunfish View Post
We just cancelled two business class returns to Europe, train in germany, car hire for six weeks, accomodation in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia, four overnight ferries, yacht charter for two weeks in Croatia, a week in venice, sicily and elsewhere, two Vietnam domestic flights and a week in Nha Trang. Now multiply by tens of thousands of similar vacations and you get a picture of the impact of this bug.

Even if a miracle cure was found tomorrow, it’s going to take a year to get back to “normal”. If there is such a thing.....
When the crisis is over (I'm betting Christmas at best, more likely next northern spring, i.e. twelve months) a whole bunch of over-65s will have a huge lot less in their super funds, maybe 50% less. It may not make a lot of difference to those who started off with $10,000,000, but those who started of with say $600,000 and have now got $300,000 are not going to splash it on an expensive overseas holiday. And nobody is going on a plague cruise ship.
The shape of tourism and leisure flying has changed for a l-o-n-g time

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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 23:13
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I did wonder when sitting in a 100 seat jet flying to a mine site would be deemed as undesireable
Of all the hundreds of thousands of people who have flown in internationally, or domestically since all this started, I can't recall one case where someone has tested positive due to exposure to a later confirmed positive case on an aircraft. Sure they contribute to spreading the virus, but they don't seem to be like cruise ships. Even airports with their exposure to the arriving (subsequently) positive cases, have not produced clusters of further virus positives.
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Old 22nd Mar 2020, 23:22
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Originally Posted by Icarus2001 View Post
I did wonder when sitting in a 100 seat jet flying to a mine site would be deemed as undesireable as sitting in the fresh air at Bondi beach. Or going to your local pub, cafe etc. So are the mines going into care and maintenance?
Geoffrey Thomas (your decision on whether you trust him) wrote an article yesterday stating that mining companies will keep a reduced FIFO schedule going with some ad hoc charter. There is also a thought from mining companies to keep a spare seat between pax for distancing which would increase the amount of flights required?

BHP is putting on 1500 casual employees for the next 6 months to preserve the integrity of their operations. It looks like China is conducting an infrastructure stimulus to restart their economy, so Iron Ore at least should be in demand.
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Old 23rd Mar 2020, 00:49
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It looks like China is conducting an infrastructure stimulus to restart their economy, so Iron Ore at least should be in demand.
When all this is over we should send China the bill.

I don't think there would be 10 of thousands of similar vacations to that.
When all this over Sunny we'd all like a copy of that awesome itinerary.
I'm yet to cancel my flight to Europe in July, but it is looking more like a no-go. Rather than take a refund I've decided I will roll the dates into next year and hope for the best.
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Old 23rd Mar 2020, 03:54
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"When all this is over we should send China the bill."

Why?
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Old 23rd Mar 2020, 03:55
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Originally Posted by cattletruck View Post
When all this is over we should send China the bill.



When all this over Sunny we'd all like a copy of that awesome itinerary.
I'm yet to cancel my flight to Europe in July, but it is looking more like a no-go. Rather than take a refund I've decided I will roll the dates into next year and hope for the best.
couldn’t agree more. Every country should add up the costs of their stimulus packages. Then take that figure and double it as it would not have been enough to compensate everyone affected. Then triple it for all the deaths inflicted on loved ones, the emotional stress this has had on people and the massive inconvenience. For Australia that number would be currently around $600 billion. Wipe that off what we owe China and if anything is left over, repossess some of the assets the Chinese government has bought here using state owned companies as cover.

as for July 2020 trip to Europe. No hope. Rebook for either May/ June or late August/ September next year. July is horrendous in Europe. It is absolute peak period. Unbelievable crowded and twice as expensive. Huge queues for tourist attractions. Even with probably reduced numbers next year.
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Old 23rd Mar 2020, 04:06
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Alan Joyce's bloodthirst for Virgin collapse - Joe Aston Columnist

Financial Review - 23/03/2020
Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce has never been one to waste a crisis. And since the novel coronavirus completely shuttered the travel industry, you’d expect an airline boss to feel a little jumpy.

Nevertheless, Joyce’s performance on Friday morning television – in which he warned the Morrison government against bailing out “the badly managed companies which have been badly managed for 10 years”, i.e. Virgin Australia – was exceptionally inelegant.

He was overreacting to a comment piece in that day’s The Australian which imagined that “some companies may end up having to be nationalised, if even only temporarily” and that “Virgin could be one example” because “there is no way [the government] will allow Australia to return to a virtual single-carrier environment in a post-virus world”.

Joyce’s initial comments on Sky – that Canberra “can’t pick winners and losers; whatever aid is given to one particular company … has to be given to everybody in that sector” – would’ve sufficed perfectly. But Joyce’s shortcoming has always been in craving a needless fight.

Short memory

By Joyce’s seventh year, he’d delivered $2.6 billion of accumulated losses and was begging Tony Abbott to pick winners and losers by extending him a $3 billion loan guarantee. And after 11 years, Joyce has accumulated net profits of only $1.75 billion – a factoid easy to forget when you see his remuneration ($92 million and counting), but crucial to remember when he critiques other companies “which have been badly managed for 10 years”.

Six years since he asked the federal government to save him, Joyce now reckons that “when good companies have managed their position very well, the government should let them manage their way through this”.
His sudden aversion to any Commonwealth assistance is astonishing but welcome. Qantas could scarcely accept public cash only five months since his chairman Richard Goyder boasted that “at the end of this latest buyback, we’ll have bought back almost one-third of our shares since 2015 – the most of any company in the ASX All Ordinaries”.

Yep, that’s $3.2 billion of excess cash (on top of dividends) it returned to shareholders, or almost how much passenger revenue Qantas will suddenly forgo this March, April and May. Handing it over (while reducing its own share count) massively juiced the airline’s share price and total shareholder returns, upon which Joyce’s bonuses are explicitly calculated. Thus management is incentivised not to save cash for a rainy day – nor, indeed, to reinvest profits productively, as Treasurer Josh Frydenberg pleaded in August.

Some quotes above from the Financial Review columnist Joe Aston in a scathing assessment of Alan Joyce portraying him as avaricious, rapacious and possessing selective memory.





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Old 23rd Mar 2020, 04:26
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Hopefully the world has learnt a lesson about putting all your eggs in one basket (Chinese manufacturing) in a globalized marketplace. It's all well and good using cheap overseas labour to pad the profit margins of the one percent even further, but when everything goes wheels up, there has to be a Plan B.

When the dust finally settles, I hope that some first world countries consider re-establishing their own internal manufacturing base so that we are not all totally reliant on China. At the very least, the world has to pressure the Chinese government to close live animal markets (and keep them closed) FOREVER. They had a warning when SARS emerged in 2005 and didn't heed it. After all of this disruption, suffering and grief, it simply has to happen this time.

PS The descriptions of Joyce left out "sociopath" from the list.
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