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Pilot shortage

Old 6th Feb 2018, 10:03
  #701 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Keg View Post
If an Airbus pilot can’t do a sim in a 744 or 737 then they’re not a very good pilot and I’d question their capability as an Airbus pilot too. The same applies the other way too. It’s about rate of learning. It’s about trainability. It’s about core skills.

However let me put it another way, if it’s not needed then why do people still fail it as not meeting a minimum standard? I’ll answer that for you. They fail it for the same reason that lots of doctors don’t actually become surgeons, lots of law graduates don’t actually become lawyers or barristers or judges.



Are you seriously suggesting that Air Ambulance don’t do a flying assessment of their employees before confirming their employment?
This was brought up in a different thread, and it was pointed out that while an Airbus pilot might struggle, how is that any different from someone flying a SAAB or a Titan? As Keg has pointed out, the assessment standard to reach is the same for everyone.
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Old 6th Feb 2018, 12:56
  #702 (permalink)  
 
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Yet air ambulance operators don't bother. Are they unsafe?
I certainly did a flight check before getting a job with an aeromed operator.
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Old 6th Feb 2018, 13:32
  #703 (permalink)  
 
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how is that any different from someone flying a SAAB or a Titan? As Keg has pointed out, the assessment standard to reach is the same for everyone
SAAB and Titans have conventional flight controls, Airbus does not.
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Old 6th Feb 2018, 14:35
  #704 (permalink)  
 
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Have you flown an Airbus Neville ?
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Old 6th Feb 2018, 22:00
  #705 (permalink)  
 
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SAAB and Titans have conventional flight controls, Airbus does not.
Well if the candidate is likely to struggle with conventional flight controls then I wouldn’t have much faith in them flying an Airbus in Direct Law with manual thrust. We’ve seen how those events can end up.
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 01:10
  #706 (permalink)  
 
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No pilot shortage if management actions are anything to go by

I’ve been watching with extreme interest, if somewhat distantly, the evolution of certain agreement between the pilots and a contractor to our favourite whipping boy airline and based on what I hear I can only conclude that there is absolutely no pilot shortage! Hoorah!!

Most noteworthy during these negotiations is the appalling lack of integrity from, not only the company, but one of the bargaining bodies too; everyone has a price don’t they!

In a time when a severe exodus in underway and morale is hazardously low, all that is being offered is the same old “we can’t afford to pay you what you’re worth” garbage. The management know that all they have to do is hide behind the Maginot line until the pilots become sick of the uncertainty and fold; A war of attrition of the highest order helped along by a body hell bent on self advancement and unhindered by those who stand by and let the persecution play out. What is most disappointing is that the true role of negotiator has fallen to a small group of individuals who have stood up to represent those pilots who distrust and despise corporate unionism. The ones I speak of know who they are but more importantly, so does ever single pilot. Strength, integrity and the ability to see BS for BS come without a fee, not a single cent! It is a sense of right and wrong that drives these people, not some out of sessions deal.

This agreement is one of many currently undergoing renewal and they are all following the same draconian path. My observations have lead me to surmise that there are a couple of options open to us in Australia at present regarding the pilot shortage. (A) Either there is simply no pilot shortage, or (B)employers of pilots and/or their behemoth benefactors are simply willing to expose the travelling public to the perfect storm of exhausted, demoralized, stressed, distracted, overworked pilots to the ever increasing possibility of adevastating accident. Yes I take it personally because these bastards sit in their boardrooms earning their exorbitant salaries fully aware of the pressure they create by denying decent pay and conditions. They deny the organics of economics, safe in the knowledge that if one of my colleagues has a bad day, the money is already in the bank.

The discontent and feeling of worthlessness is sinking in very fast now and the airlines have very limited time to reverse those sentiments. They should be coming with their best deal today, not something they think will creep over the line, because by year send it could be too late.

Fly safe and learn to say “NO”!
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 07:59
  #707 (permalink)  
 
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Explain the logic behind sim testing a prior Airbus pilot in a 737 classic sim that requires a more analogue type instrument scan?
Still T Scan on glass.
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Old 15th Feb 2018, 06:50
  #708 (permalink)  
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An assessment of a candidate is looking at basic skills, SA, and the ability to improve where there is an obvious issue. To transition from a B7XX to an A3XX takes a short discussion on what the SSC is doing, and if the auto thrust is to be used, which would be slightly unfair, then how that functions. Otherwise, they all fly the same. They also fly more or less like a Cessna 310. They are vastly less interesting than any Lear, particularly 24's, they rotate without the wackiness of a Westwind. The instruments are more or less the same. This also applies for an MD11, B717, MD80, FK100, etc. They are all better than link trainers, and that is still a reasonable method of assessing whether a person can comprehend instrument displays and manipulate a control system to achieve a semblance of the desired outcome, and whether basic CRM skills exist. If you happen to know the Smiths or Honeywell FMC, FMGCS, FCP etc, then all the better, but it is not the primary point of interest. Having said all that, transitioning routinely from a high inertia aircraft B777/B747/A340 etc back to low inertia plane, A320/B737 does end up with a period of learning on glideslope maintenance, which is still not very long to sort out

Good luck with whatever you drive. In the end it is not what you are flying, or even where you go, it is who you are with that is memorable.
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Old 16th Feb 2018, 02:59
  #709 (permalink)  
 
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Australian Pilots already have the highest wages compared to most , it’s the Tax office that deprives you of around half leaving you in so called poverty !
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Old 16th Feb 2018, 04:26
  #710 (permalink)  
 
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Australian Pilots already have the highest wages compared to most ,
Have you got a source or some data to back up that claim?
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Old 16th Feb 2018, 09:25
  #711 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Oriana
Still T Scan on glass.
Yes, the Boeing man said that during my CBT. I laughed (cried). He was, in a way, correct. Yes, it does have an ASI, and it does have an altimeter but...
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Old 16th Feb 2018, 22:49
  #712 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Icarus2001 View Post
Have you got a source or some data to back up that claim?
You’re correct to be a little suspicious over his claim. Using Kegs recent data on Qantas compensation, an A380 Captain is paid less than a 737 Captain at one of the big four carriers in the U.S. When taxation is brought into the equation, the disparity is even greater.

I take no pleasure in these metrics. The little Irishman is getting away with murder.
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Old 22nd Feb 2018, 01:26
  #713 (permalink)  
 
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Eyeing the enormous demand for air travel and pilots coming from Asia, Mr Joyce announced that Qantas would open its own pilot academy in 2019, which it hoped would become the biggest in the southern hemisphere, capable of producing 500 pilots a year.
"To do it, we’ll partner with a leading education provider, and we’ll engage with federal, state and territory governments who want to attract a facility of this calibre," Mr Joyce said.

So somehow Strayan exceptionalism does not stop Australia being part of the global shortage...
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Old 22nd Feb 2018, 05:17
  #714 (permalink)  
 
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QANTAS already has a pilot training academy. It is called Cathay Pacific Airways Limited.
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Old 24th Feb 2018, 06:28
  #715 (permalink)  
 
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Air Pocket: Why Jet Airways’ pilot loss could mean actual losses

Shortage of captains to hit overseas flights it relies on for revenue, profit; OTP too affected

Mumbai | Published: February 23, 2018 5:27 AM


A pilot at Jet said on condition of anonymity that the functioning of the airline had changed with sudden changes being introduced. (Reuters)

With chances of nearly 50 senior pilots moving out of Jet Airways, the airline could be in trouble as it faces a shortage of captains. Every flight must have at least one captain and Jet’s present pool of pilots includes about 831 captains, of whom only about 330 fly wide-bodied aircraft. It is critical for the carrier to have captains to fly wide-bodied aircraft as it is hugely dependent on its overseas operations for revenues and profits. Even before this, Jet was already having trouble with first officers over pay cuts. The pilot count at about 1,734 today (according to industry sources, as the airline does not disclose these numbers) is down from about 2,000 in July last year, and falling. FE has learnt that the majority of the 50 senior pilots is headed to Vistara, the Tata-Singapore Airlines joint venture, which is in expansion mode.The trouble between junior pilots and the management started in July last year after the management wrote to them suggesting they either take a 30-50% cut in their salaries or stipend or leave. The move followed excess hiring of about 200 first officers on an inaccurate demand forecasting by its team. This was reported by the media at the time.

A pilot at Jet said on condition of anonymity that the functioning of the airline had changed with sudden changes being introduced. “They are also a breach of the contract that was entered into by the pilots and the airline,” the pilot added. He said today pilots do not want to fly after their duty hours if there is a shortage of hands as was the case earlier. Jet declined to comment for the story. On an investor call earlier this month, Jet CFO Amit Agarwal said the airline was taking a series of steps to improve its on-time performance (OTP). Agarwal said the OTP had improved in January and February compared with that in the December quarter and that this is the ongoing focus area for the airline.

In response of FE’s query to Vistara on the subject, the airline said, “As we continue to scale up our business and operations, it is only natural for us to hire more talent, including cockpit crew. As every other airline, most applications for technical positions, such as that for pilots, come to us from within the industry. We’re glad that in a short span of three years, our success has drawn great interest from people within and outside the aviation ecosystem, helping us become an employer of choice.”
The non-cooperative stance of several pilots is impacting the on-time performance of Jet.

“An airline running out of pilot flying hours is symptomatic of deep trouble within that airline and there is widespread discontent among Jet pilots and we might see some who will look at opportunities with other domestic carriers,” said an airline executive not wanting to be named. In aviation industry parlance, pilot shortage is meant to indicate an airline not having pilots with adequate flying hours available to continue flying. In the early 2000s, the entire aviation industry had struggled with pilot shortage due to the flying hour restriction. Regulations today mandate that a pilot can fly for only 1,000 hours in every consecutive 365 days.

Besides, absenteeism, medical reasons can also lead to pilots not being able to fly. This makes rostering a challenge. Any incorrect rostering can create an issue as pilots are barred from flying more than 8 hours per day, more than 35 hours in seven days and more than 125 hours in 30 consecutive days, besides the yearly flying hours restriction.What’s even more worrying is that Jet seems to have become the hunting ground for talent. While the private sector had in its initial years poached talent from Air India, and later tapped talent from a sinking Kingfisher Airlines, today they find the disgruntled pilots at Jet an ideal catch. And they are going after senior talent, mostly captains.

Jet had 903 first officers (as on January 1, 2018). What’s more, Jet flies a range of aircraft — wide-bodied A350s and Boeing-777s, besides Boeing-737s and ATRs — and, therefore, its pilot requirements are quite different from peers, who mostly fly one type of aircraft. For instance, wide-bodied aircraft require more pilots per aircraft than single-aisle aircraft. Besides, a pilot of one type of aircraft cannot always be used to fly another type of aircraft.

That Jet flies much more overseas than any other airline (read wide-bodied aircraft), makes it even more vulnerable to poaching, as such talent is sought after by peers looking to expand their overseas operations. Jet had a share of 44% in international flights by Indian carriers in FY17 (more recent data was not available), with Air India commanding a share of 32%, followed by IndiGo and SpiceJet at 14% and 10%, respectively.

More importantly, Jet is hugely dependant on its overseas operations for both revenues and traffic. In January, for instance, it flew 23,144 hours (52.4%) on international routes against 21,007 hours (47.6%) on domestic routes. In contrast, domestic market leader IndiGo flew 53,161 hours (87.3%) on domestic routes against only 7,761 hours (22.7%) on international routes. Given that international flights require a larger allocation of crew per aircraft than a domestic flight, Jet’s pilot strength suddenly starts to look very different vis-a-vis competition.

Jet is believed to have close to 1,734 pilots to service about 650 flights per day using 119 aircraft. In contrast, IndiGo has 2,300 pilots on its rolls for a peak of 1,020 flights using 153 aircraft. Even without considering the higher allocation of manpower for international flights, Jet’s pilots per aircraft ratio at over 14 seems less comfortable than IndiGo’s over 15. After the excessive hiring in early 2017, Jet seems to have swung sharply in the other direction, and this is telling. Brokerage Credit Suisse in a report on the aviation sector points out that Jet’s employee benefit expenses are sharply higher than those of IndiGo and SpiceJet. Jet’s employee expenses to revenues in Q3-FY18 stood at 12% versus 9.9% for IndiGo.

The Jet management seems conscious of this and has been taking steps to address it. But pilots are upset because its move to crimp costs is impacting pilot welfare schemes and contracts of some pilots. The cost-cutting is also translating into pruning of support staff strength, like engineers at some locations, which is also a concern for pilots. Jet saw its employee expenses rise by 5.3% in Q3FY18 while operating revenue grew 10.2%. In contrast, employee costs for IndiGo grew 16.4% with operating revenue growth of 23.9%.

The Naresh Goyal-promoted airline continues to find itself at the bottom of the pack with an OTP of 62.4% in January. Market leader IndiGo’s OTP was 75.4%, followed closely by SpiceJet at 74.4%, according to Directorate General of Civil Aviation data. In 2014, there were reports that Jet and Etihad had tried to poach at least 140 Air India pilots and the government was mulling putting mechanisms in place to curb the practice. Is Jet at the receiving end today?
Air Pocket: Why Jet Airways' pilot loss could mean actual losses - The Financial Express
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Old 24th Feb 2018, 07:10
  #716 (permalink)  
 
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“An airline running out of pilot flying hours is symptomatic of deep trouble within that airline and there is widespread discontent among Jet pilots and we might see some who will look at opportunities with other domestic carriers,” said an airline executive not wanting to be named. In aviation industry parlance, pilot shortage is meant to indicate an airline not having pilots with adequate flying hours available to continue flying. In the early 2000s, the entire aviation industry had struggled with pilot shortage due to the flying hour restriction. Regulations today mandate that a pilot can fly for only 1,000 hours in every consecutive 365 days.

How about instead of endless wars against staff airlines accept the new paradigm; respect for a pilot as part of the revenue generation of an airline, a vital component at that...

Nah, push the regulator, defer CAO 48.1, and extend and pretend until revenue is non existent!


How about clear out a floor or two at Waterside or Coward street of HR?
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Old 24th Feb 2018, 07:24
  #717 (permalink)  
 
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You mean the corporate fascists.
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Old 24th Feb 2018, 10:38
  #718 (permalink)  
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How about clear out a floor or two at Waterside or Coward street of HR?
There is no way flights would get safely to destination if you did that, let alone on time, keep it realistic please.
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Old 24th Feb 2018, 10:45
  #719 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by framer View Post
There is no way flights would get safely to destination if you did that, let alone on time, keep it realistic please.
I don't know, there's no one at Coward St on the weekend and all those flights some how seem to depart...
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Old 24th Feb 2018, 10:48
  #720 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Rated De
Waterside
Please explain? Just a lat/long will do! I'll work out the rest.
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