Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Worldwide > Australia, New Zealand & the Pacific
Reload this Page >

Truss: Aviation Safety Regulation Review

Australia, New Zealand & the Pacific Airline and RPT Rumours & News in Australia, enZed and the Pacific

Truss: Aviation Safety Regulation Review

Old 1st Dec 2014, 04:48
  #1521 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: No fixed address
Posts: 163
TSB Report

Austra,

May 2014. Beaker extended it till late June at the May Estimates. Only 7 months overdue now! Considering the Pel-Air accident is now over 5 years ago; it took 3 years to come up with a flawed report, and now 18 months to come up with a review of that report, betting on hours and dates is somewhat optimistic. I'm taking the Canadian strategy of mid-winter (Canadian season of course)! When the Canadians say late autumn, they didn't actually clarify in what hemisphere. So there is a chance it could be May 2015!
Mrdak did say at the last Estimates that the full repsonse to the ASRR would be prior to the end of the year, but he didn't say what year. He's definitely learnt a thing or two from the Canadians

Last edited by Jinglie; 1st Dec 2014 at 04:52. Reason: Searching Hemispherical weather changes to determine release of critical safety information.
Jinglie is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 05:22
  #1522 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Weltschmerz-By-The-Sea, Queensland, Australia
Posts: 683
Well, May, 2015 isn't autumn anywhere. That's why I figured 21 Dec, which is when Autumn ends in Canada. They'll be a day or two late, so maybe the 23rd there, 24th here.

Talk about a snow job...
Australopithecus is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 10:27
  #1523 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: have I forgotten or am I lost?
Age: 66
Posts: 1,129
while everyone details the watching of the farce that is australian aviation misregulation, there is the need for a rest from the gladiatorial tripe upon us.

I would sincerely recommend hunting out a copy of a John Steinbeck novel.
"The Moon is down"

read it. you'll never fear CAsA again.

my recommendation is probably nothing but Winston Churchill was also an appreciative reader of the novel.

it is not that big as novels go but it is brilliant.

welcome to your future CAsA you so richly deserve it.
dubbleyew eight is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 11:40
  #1524 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia
Age: 49
Posts: 547
Can't copy the link in on my phone. Flight global has an article title 'CASA accused of "misconduct" by Australia's light aircraft association'.
halfmanhalfbiscuit is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 11:56
  #1525 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Yosemite
Age: 47
Posts: 177
One for Biscuit

Here you go Herr Biscuit;

CASA accused of 'misconduct' by Australia's light aircraft association - 12/1/2014 - Flight Global

I guess that means Flightglobal, by default, are now part of the IOS and MaM as well?
Unfortunately for Jabiru they are done for. They have received a mark on the forehead from CASA and will pay the highest price. CASA have chosen now, the lead up into Xmas as the time to inflict the most pain and damage. It's an old trick, often resurrected and tweaked and then applied to an operation that CASA deem to be 'unfit' and a significant safety risk - overnight judge, jury and executioner. Another one bites the dust.....
Soteria is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 14:18
  #1526 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia
Age: 49
Posts: 547
Soteria, what area of casa is driving this? Is it lsa, engineering and manufacturing or maintenance area?

Nice start for mr Skidmore.

Yes, flight global should get an ncn! Although it could be just as damaging to Jabiru as it is to casa.
halfmanhalfbiscuit is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 19:06
  #1527 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,400
Who is driving the RAA and Jabiru destruction? Can it only be the former General Manager of the RAA who was hired by CASA?

Anyone with half a brain who has studied the tactics of CASA can see that CASA is attempting to close Jabiru down. The assertion CASA is making is that Jabiru engines are terminally unsafe.

If the assertion is allowed to stand, no one will buy Jabiru engines at any price. Furthermore, anyone who already owns an aircraft powered by one has their investment rendered worthless. The outcome is most likely the death of the Jabiru engine company and perhaps the airframe builder as well.

In turn this destroys the RAA financially and perhaps the SAAA as well since a precedent has now been set that CASA can act with impunity on the basis of a mere assertion.

This action by CASA must be seen for what it is : an attack on recreational aviation in all its forms.

Personally I suspect this is an attempt by the senior managers of CASA to take revenge on recreational aviation groups for having the temerity to contribute to the recent Senate Review of CASA.
Sunfish is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 19:34
  #1528 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia
Age: 49
Posts: 547
Personally I suspect this is an attempt by the senior managers of CASA to take revenge on recreational aviation groups for having the temerity to contribute to the recent Senate Review of CASA.
If that is the case let the good Senators know the concerns. They seem to be getting grumpy with ASA presently.
halfmanhalfbiscuit is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 20:43
  #1529 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: In my Swag
Posts: 495
Sunfish-- This action by CASA must be seen for what it is : an attack on recreational aviation in all its forms.
This maybe so, but old mate here where I am camped at the moment has been trying to get Jabiru to attend to the issues for over two years.
Eddie Dean is offline  
Old 1st Dec 2014, 21:41
  #1530 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,400
Eddie:

This maybe so, but old mate here where I am camped at the moment has been trying to get Jabiru to attend to the issues for over two years.
I agree that from what I have heard Jabiru has been, to put it mildly, less than stellar in its customer support.

However CASA has now used the equivalent of a shotgun to remove the proverbial splinter in the finger and it threatens the entire recreational aviation sector in the process.

The action against Jabiru is a perfect example, as if any more were needed, of the clearly deficient CASA culture. Even If we assume that CASA is genuinely interested in the safety of Jabiru operators, which I doubt, I would have thought that a rational strategy from a regulator who cared about the impact of its activities on its clients would be:

(1) Form a working group of CASA, RAA and Jabiru staff.

(2) Assemble available reliability data.

(3) Analyse the data to determine if there are systematic failure modes, compare the failure rates in each mode and in total against those for comparable engines, Rotax, Lycoming, Continental and others both certified and uncertified.

(4) As part of (3); Use statistical hypothesis testing to determine at a suitable degree of significance (say 95 and 99 percent) to quantify the risks of engine failure of Jabiru engines compared to the other makes.

(5) Now that we have rigourous data analysis, we can state the following: "We can say with 95% accuracy that the failure rate of Jabiru engines of this mod status is x/100,000 hours, compared to Rotax 912 engines with Y/100,000 hrs and lycoming with z/100,000 hrs".

(6) We can now look at options for improvement : " replacement of through bolts in X Jabiru engines will change failure rates from A/100,000 hrs to B/100,000 hrs at an estimated total cost of C dollars".

(7) We can then group the options to determine exactly what strategy results in the most bang per buck.

(8) CASA can then pull out its ******* great cannon and point it at Jabirus head and tell them to implement the recommendations as a set of service bulletins or CASA will issue them as airworthiness directives.

Yet what CASA seems to me to have done is adopt the opposite strategy; Ready, Fire, Aim.

And on a final, bizarre note, it would appear that the sensible strategy for an RAA Jabiru operator would be to replace the Jabiru engine with a completely untested car engine conversion. After all, if there is no data on its reliability, CASA have no grounds on which to restrict its use.
Sunfish is offline  
Old 2nd Dec 2014, 21:41
  #1531 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Go west young man
Posts: 1,732
Government response to ASRR & Board appointments.

Government responds to Aviation Safety Review

Media Release
WT249/2014
03 December 2014




Honouring a key aviation election commitment, the Australian Government today released its response to the 37 recommendations and related issues raised in the Aviation Safety Regulation Review Report.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development Warren Truss said the Report backs-up Australia's advanced aviation regulatory system as one of the safest public transport systems in the world.

“Australia has a well-earned reputation for aviation safety and is respected the world over,” Mr Truss said.

“However, given the speed with which the global aviation industry is changing, we must look for and embrace continuous improvement in our aviation safety regulatory system to capture the growing diversity of aviation in Australia industry.

“Today the Australian Government has responded to each of the recommendations and related issues raised in the Report, taking into consideration feedback received from key aviation agencies, the public and industry.

“The Australian Government has agreed to 32 of the Report's 37 recommendations and has agreed to undertake a more detailed examination of a further four.

“Aviation safety systems need everyone in the system to work closely and cooperatively to identify safety risks and to ensure that the most appropriate practices and technologies are adopted to address and reduce risks.

“Active engagement between industry and aviation agencies will help inform future regulatory priorities and the development of simpler regulations, standards and orders.

“Successful implementation of the Australian Government's response to the Report will require our civil and military aviation agencies to work closely together, as well as the active and constructive participation of both the aviation industry and aviation agencies.

“Information sharing between industry and safety agencies must be based on a strong ‘just culture’ approach to assist in preventing future safety events and reflect international best practice. We look forward to working with industry to implement improvements.”

The Government's response to the Aviation Safety Regulation Review Report is available at www.infrastructure.gov.au.

ASRR Government Response

CASA Board appointments

Media Release
WT250/2014
03 December 2014




Today the Australian Government announced three new appointments to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) Board.

As part of the Government's response to the Aviation Safety Regulation Review, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development Warren Truss has appointed Ms Anita Taylor, Mr Ian Smith AM and Captain Murray Warfield to the CASA Board for the next three years.

“These appointments bring pertinent technical, operational and managerial experience to help the Board play a more active leadership and review role in setting and steering CASA's strategic direction,” Mr Truss said.
“Anita Taylor is a well-known sports aviator who has been gliding since she was 16. She is President of the Gliding Federation of Australia and a member of the Australian Sport Aviation Confederation. Ms Taylor is a chartered accountant and an experienced company director, with involvement in banking, finance, community and sport sectors.

“Ian Smith AM has 24 years' experience in the aviation insurance industry. Early in his year he was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia for the promotion and development of aviation. Mr Smith has been a private pilot since 1976 and has held both twin-engine and command instrument ratings.

“From 1979 to 1985, Mr Smith was actively involved with the staging of the Schofields Air Shows and has more recently contributed to the development of the highly successful Australian International Air Show held biennially at Avalon Airport in Victoria.

“Captain Murray Warfield is an aviation consultant who has held both piloting and senior executive roles with Qantas, after a successful career in the Royal Australian Air Force.

“These new appointments are consistent with Recommendation 6 of the Aviation Safety Regulation Review Report, namely that the Board possess a range of appropriate skills and backgrounds, and will strengthen CASA's vital role as the independent aviation safety regulator to the high standards expected by Australians.

“I look forward to working with the new Board, other Government agencies and the aviation industry on the implementation of the Government's response to the Report which I have released today.”

Today's announcement completes the expanded CASA Board following the recent appointment of Air Vice Marshal (Rtd) Mark Skidmore AM as Director of Aviation Safety and Mr Jeff Boyd as Deputy Chair earlier this year.


MTF...
Sarcs is offline  
Old 2nd Dec 2014, 22:54
  #1532 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,400
Read it once.

Proof, pudding, eating.

It is now a case of a contest of wills between the Board, DAS and senior CASA managers in my opinion.
Sunfish is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2014, 02:58
  #1533 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Go west young man
Posts: 1,732
Truss tabling the ASRR Govt response.

Ministerial Statement: The Australian Government's Response to the Aviation Safety Regulation Review Report

Speech
WTS031/2014
03 December 2014

House of Representatives
Parliament House, Canberra

Madam Speaker, in November last year the Government established an independent review of Australia's aviation safety regulatory system to ensure that it is well positioned to meet Australia's future aviation demands.

The review was conducted by an independent panel headed by Mr David Forsyth AM, a respected figure in Australian aviation through his previous senior managerial roles in Qantas and as Chair of Airservices Australia.
Mr Forsyth was joined on the panel by two eminent overseas aviation safety experts—Mr Don Spruston from Canada and Mr Roger Whitefield from the United Kingdom.

On 3 June 2014, I tabled the panel's Aviation Safety Regulation Review Report in Parliament.

Since tabling the report the Government has given careful consideration to the 37 recommendations and other matters raised in the Report.

This consideration has been informed by close consultation with our aviation agencies and by 69 industry and public comments on the Report.
I am pleased today to be able to table the Government's response to the Report.

The Report confirms that Australia has an advanced aviation regulatory system in place and one of the safest regular public transport systems in the world.

Australia also has sound safety governance arrangements which ensure that the regulatory, investigative and service provision roles of our key aviation agencies are properly separated.

However given the speed with which the global and domestic aviation industry is changing, we need to look for continuous improvement in our aviation safety regulatory system.

We need to update our system to reflect the growing diversity of our aviation industry.

The Report has identified areas where our present arrangements, structures and relationships can be improved to ensure Australia remains a leading aviation State.

The Report made 37 recommendations, many relating to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), but others have implications for the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), Airservices Australia (Airservices), my Department and the Department of Defence.

The Government has fully agreed to, or agreed to undertake a more detailed examination of, 36 of the 37 recommendations.

Key Aviation Safety Principles



In responding to the Report the Government has endorsed a number of key principles that should continue to underpin our future aviation safety system:
  • safety should be the primary consideration of CASA, Airservices, the ATSB and the industry in the performance of their functions;
  • the highest safety priority should be afforded to passenger transport operations;
  • Australia's regulatory approach and responses should be based on a sound assessment of the level of risk associated with particular aviation operations;
  • aviation agencies and industry should work closely together to identify aviation safety risks and ensure that the most appropriate methods, practices and technologies are adopted to address and reduce these risks;
  • a strong “just culture” approach must underpin better information sharing between industry and safety agencies as information sharing assists in preventing future safety events and reflects international best practice;
  • recognition that Australia's safety regulatory system plays an important role in ensuring that Australia has a safe, efficient and competitive aviation industry;
  • Australia's aviation regulatory procedures, processes and approach to regulation should be fair, transparent and promote nationally consistent operations; and
  • active and ongoing engagement by industry and CASA will help inform future regulatory priorities and the development of simpler regulations, standards and orders.
These principles and the actions which flow from them will be contained in an enhanced State Safety Program (SSP). The SSP will outline short, medium and long term objectives for our aviation system including planned major regulatory, infrastructure and service changes.

In addition, the respective policy, regulatory, investigative and service provision roles and coordination between Government aviation agencies will continue to be clearly set out in the SSP and how they should work cooperatively on major initiatives.

The Government recognises that our agencies and industry are already operating to some extent in accordance with these principles but believes it is important that they be set out to help guide the future direction of our aviation safety system.


The Role of the Aviation Safety Regulator

CASA is a critical element in our aviation safety system.

CASA is first and foremost the regulator for civil aviation with the increasingly challenging task of implementing and oversighting a range of aviation regulatory arrangements.

Additionally CASA plays a key role in developing new regulations and amending existing regulations to take account of industry changes, emerging safety issues and meeting international standards and practices.

In establishing this review the Government was conscious of complaints it had received from industry about CASA's regulatory approach and the perceived insufficient regard to the impacts of regulatory actions or proposed new or amended regulations on industry operations. Problems with the implementation of new egulatory standards have also been raised by industry as an issue. The review panel has clearly received submissions that have raised similar concerns.

The role of the regulator is a difficult one. CASA serves not only the industry but the public more broadly.

CASA is part of a system which is charged with protecting all passengers, their crew and the community. Members of the travelling public are not usually able to make their own individual assessments of safety issues and rely on the regulatory system for assurance.

Aviation services can be complex and expensive operations. The business environment in which aviation operates is a challenging and often highly competitive one with fluctuating market conditions. Even well-established and well intentioned aviation operators can encounter problems.
In such a complex environment the Government expects the regulator to be firm but fair in how it conducts its role.

The regulator also needs to be well-informed about the industry context, conscious of the impacts that its actions have on operators and open to approaches which achieve safety outcomes without unnecessary impacts on industry.

This approach calls for effective and ongoing engagement and communication with the industry, both at a strategic and working level. As the Aviation Safety Regulation Review recommends, we need to create an “effective collaborative relationship [between CASA and the industry based] on a foundation of mutual understanding and respect.”

CASA Governance

As a key part of our aviation safety system, the Government expects the CASA Board to take an active role in setting directions for CASA and overseeing its functions.

Critically the Government also expects the Board to maintain an effective dialogue with industry at a strategic level.

The Government has already moved to enhance the aviation skills and experience on the Board, with amendments passed earlier this year to the Civil Aviation Act 1988 to expand the Board to seven members.

The Government has appointed Mr Jeff Boyd as Deputy Chairman of the Board, who brings valuable experience in working with different parts of the diverse Australian aviation industry.

Today I am pleased to announce the appointment of three more members to the CASA Board to fill the current vacancies.

The new members are; Anita Taylor, a Chartered Accountant, experienced company director and long term member of the Sport Aviation industry who has been gliding since she was 16; Captain Murray Warfield, formerly Qantas General Manager of Regulatory and Industry Affairs; and finally Ian
Smith, who has had a long and distinguished career in the aviation insurance industry earlier this year he was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia for the promotion and development of aviation.

The Government also welcomes the appointment of Air Vice Marshal (Retired) Mark Skidmore AM to the position of the Director of Aviation Safety. This appointment will bring a further wealth of aviation experience to the Board.

The Government will also be issuing a new Statement of Expectations (SOE) to the revamped CASA Board to give effect to the recommendations in the Report.

The Board will appropriately have the opportunity to set out in an implementation plan their response to the new SOE.

The Government looks forward to working with the new Board and Director in the delivery of all of these recommendations.

Consistent with the Government's broader agenda in deregulation, the Government also expects CASA to continue to look for ways to reduce regulatory costs on the industry without compromising safety.

ATSB Governance

The Government fully supports the vital role of the ATSB.
Independent investigation of accidents or incidents remains a critical element of the safety system, helping us understand the causes and hence the sources of risks to safety. This helps to avoid future accidents.

If the system is to work well, industry must cooperate in providing information during accident and incident investigations and in reporting incidents generally.



The Government will take a number of actions to give effect to this commitment including:
  • the appointment of an additional ATSB Commissioner with aviation experience; and
  • issuing a new Statement of Expectations to the ATSB once the Commission and the Government has had the opportunity to review the findings of the Canadian Transportation Safety Board review of the ATSB publicly released earlier this week.
Madam Speaker, yesterday the Canadian Transport Safety Bureau (TSB) released its independent report into the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB).

The ATSB tasked the Canadian TSB to undertake an independent review of their investigation methodologies and processes, how they were applied in specific cases and how this compared to international best-practice standards.

The TSB review looked in detail at three separate investigations, one of which was the Pel-Air inquiry which as Members may recall was the subject of a Report by the Senate Rural, Regional Affairs and Transport Committee.
While the Canadian TSB found that ATSB investigation methodology and analysis tools represent best practice and have been shown to produce very good results, they found that in the case of the Pel-Air investigation, there were errors made.

I am concerned that the TSB report raises some concerns about the application of ATSB methodologies in the investigation into the ditching of a Pel-Air off Norfolk Island in 2009.

As a consequence, I have asked the ATSB Commission to give serious consideration to reopening the investigation.

On a related point, as I have just announced I will shortly be appointing a new Commissioner to the ATSB with a specific background in aviation. This will fulfil an undertaking made by the Coalition prior to the election.
I have asked that the fresh review of the Pel-Air accident should take into account the findings of the TSB's report.

Policy and Coordination Role of the Department

The Government has carefully considered the policy and coordination role of the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development, in the future aviation safety system.

The Government expects the Department as the Chair of the Aviation Policy Group (APG) to lead work between agencies to ensure coordinated planning and action on the development of the aviation safety system.
While each agency has its own legislative charter and priorities, planning needs to be coordinated across agencies.

The Department and the other members of APG, CASA, Airservices and the Department of Defence, should use that forum to coordinate and steer improvements in our aviation safety system.

APG should also take the lead in guiding the development, monitoring and maintenance of the SSP.

The Government has also identified a number of important aviation safety policy issues which it believes the Department is well placed, in close consultation with other aviation agencies, to progress final policy advice for the Government's consideration.

These policy issues cover aviation rescue and firefighting services and airspace protection.

Other Agencies and Departments

Airservices Australia and the Department of Defence play significant roles in our aviation safety system.

The current OneSKY Australia programme is aimed at establishing a nationally harmonised air traffic management system. The programme represents an exciting opportunity for both civil and military aviation to receive a better, seamless national air traffic service in the future.

It should also be acknowledged that increased civil aviation demand at several locations around Australia continues to place pressures on military aviation facilities and services.

While not specifically highlighted in the Report, the Government also recognises the key role the Bureau of Meteorology plays in our aviation safety system and this role will be reinforced in our State Safety Program.

Aviation Industry Role

The Government expects all of our civil and military aviation agencies to work together, and in close consultation with industry, to implement the Government's response to the Report.

But it is just as important that industry works collaboratively with aviation safety agencies to produce the best safety outcomes. Successful implementation of these recommendations will need the active and constructive participation of our aviation industry, working openly and positively with our agencies.

We are aware that relationships have not been as good as they need to be and there are diverse views even within the industry on some issues.

We also understand that industry commitment to work constructively with Government agencies on aviation safety issues requires industry members to dedicate scarce time and resources.

The Government strongly urges industry representatives and aviation agencies to work together across the broad range of issues, including the development of future regulatory priorities.

It is time to reset the relationship between industry and agencies and move onwards, recognising our strong aviation safety record and the potential improvements that can be made in line with the Report's recommendations.

On the basis of the strong response to the Review and the release of the Review's Report, the Government is confident that industry and our regulatory agencies will positively take up these opportunities.

I look forward to holding the first Aviation Industry Consultative Council meeting before the end of the year. This will provide a great opportunity to discuss matters of broader concern to the aviation industry and ensure that industry has a forum for putting forward their views.

Conclusion

Australia has worked hard to become one of the most respected aviation safety systems in the world.

But like any system it should be subject to continuous improvement and works best when all of those engaged in the system are working closely together.

The Report has offered us recommendations which will help with Australia's continuous commitment to improve our safety system.

The Government's response has clearly set out our aviation safety policies, principles and priorities to our agencies, industry and the community to help with this process.

The Government looks forward to working with our aviation agencies and industry in the implementation of the recommendations of the Report.
Madam Speaker, I commend the Government's response to the Aviation Safety Regulation Review Report to the Parliament.

MTF...
Sarcs is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2014, 06:23
  #1534 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Go west young man
Posts: 1,732
Round the traps on ASRR Govt response.

AA online: Government backs bulk of ASRR recommendations

Oz Flying: Truss tables Government Response to Forsyth Report

Aviation Business: Government finally responds to Forsyth Report

The Oz: Norfolk Island 2009 Pel-Air crash probe may be reopened

I know..I know obscure headline but MMSM Steve does mention the Government response in there...err somewhere??

And finally...courtesy of AA online...:
Industry welcomes government response to ASRR

Badly needed reforms to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) have taken a “critical first step” with the appointment of three new directors to the board, an aviation industry group says.

Aerial Agricultural Association of Australia (AAAA) chief executive Phil Hirst says the addition of Anita Taylor, Ian Smith and Murray Warfield to what will be a seven-member CASA board, as well as the government’s response to the Aviation Safety Regulatory Review (ASRR), represents “a very welcome turning of the page for aviation policy”.

Hirst says the government’s commitment to issue a new statement of expectations to CASA as part of its response to the ASRR written by former Airservices chairman David Forsyth, where it will accept 32 of the report’s 37 recommendations, is also a welcome move.

“The announcement today of three new board members – all with aviation experience – is another strong downpayment on improving CASA governance and creating a better relationship with industry,” Hirst said in a statement on Wednesday.

“The government’s detailed response to the Forsyth review is also a very positive statement of intent to both reset the CASA/industry relationship and to bring CASA up to speed as a regulator we can be proud of.
“Industry desperately wants meaningful change in its interactions with CASA – including improvements in response to issues such as regulatory reform, AOC issuing and amendment timeframes, licencing and reductions in costs.”

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development Warren Truss handed down the government’s response to the ASRR on Wednesday.

Truss told parliament it was time to “reset the relationship between industry and agencies and move onwards, recognising our strong aviation safety record and the potential improvements that can be made in line with the report’s recommendations”.

“Successful implementation of these recommendations will need the active and constructive participation of our aviation industry, working openly and positively with our agencies,” Truss said in a statement to parliament.
As part of its response, the government said it would accept recommendations that called on CASA to fully disclose all findings from audits at audit exit briefings.

The Australian Airports Association (AAA) said this was a positive reform, given it would ensure airports were immediately altered to any potential safety issues and were able to respond quickly, rather than having to wait weeks or months for the formal results of the audit.

Also, AAA chief executive Caroline Wilkie said the association supported the government’s request that the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development provide further policy advice on airspace protection arrangements for Australian airports.

“Airspace protection is a critical issue for Australian airports, both large and small, and vital for the future growth of Australian aviation,” Wilkie said in a statement on Wednesday.

“Implementation of the government’s response to the recommendations should assist in strengthening the relationship, communications and engagement between the regulator and industry, which will help to deliver even stronger outcomes for aviation safety in Australia.”
The government’s full response can be found here.
MTF...
Sarcs is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2014, 17:46
  #1535 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: No fixed address
Posts: 163
Norfolk

If they want to re-open the investigation, all they need to do is read the very detailed submissions to the AAI. A lot of detailed work done by experts, unlike Beaker and the incompetent crew. If they re-open it, who will do it? No-one involved at the ATSB or CASA can be trusted, and there were plenty involved. MD, IS, MW, JH, JW to name a few. At CASA, PB, RW, JG, TF, JM, RC, RW, JA, AA, JR etc. You know who you are. Shame on you for your part in this accident, but more so for being a major part in screwing the aviation safety system of Australia.
Jinglie is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2014, 19:29
  #1536 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Go west young man
Posts: 1,732
Unhappy Sideshow Albo - What a piece of work!

Maybe Albo - along with his mate Bill(TR Zinger)Shorten - was on a high from kicking the living sht out of TA and his govt over the last week; or maybe he thought he could get some cheap points - after all whoever listens to the opposition spokesman's reply to ministerial statements...

Well I am afraid that I did and Jinglie - besides being a true affront to the senses of any genuine IOS member - I think you will find parts of the following self-flagellating, spin & bulldust quite revealing to why the initials you highlighted truly thought they could get away with it...

To begin Albo went through the usual spiel of how aviation safety is not a political football and how essential it is to the economy..blah..blah..blah..

But then the stropathon began:
I want to take this opportunity to pay tribute to John McCormick. John McCormick did an outstanding job. He was someone who was recruited after an international search for the best person. He brought decades of experience, not just in the Australian aviation industry but also particularly in Hong Kong, for Cathay Pacific, and in the international sector. I think he provided a rigour that was needed at the time. When John McCormick made the decision to ground Tiger Airways, that decision to ground an RPT service for the first—and hopefully the last—time in Australia's history was not only a courageous step but one that was entirely appropriate and needed. When Mr McCormick had advised me of the decision, I remember speaking to Prime Minister Gillard and informing her of what was about to occur—because, by definition, you cannot make a decision that an airline is unsafe and then say, 'we will ground them in a couple of days' time'. What it meant by definition was that people got stranded. There was a real-world impact on the travelling public, particularly given the nature of Tiger; and on many families who were able to travel by air for the first time, because it was a budget airline.
That was a courageous decision by John McCormick. The fact that Tiger has now been taken over by Virgin Australia and is now functioning in a way that satisfies all the safety concerns shows that that was not just a courageous decision but a correct decision.
Err no comment but then it just got worse and IMO makes Albo close to public (IOS) enemy number one :
In the report, the review panel expressed concern about relations between the industry and the regulator. It said this:
In recent years, the regulator has adopted an across the board hard-line philosophy, which in the Panel’s view, is not appropriate for an advanced aviation nation such as Australia. As a result, relationships between industry and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) have, in many cases, become adversarial.
It went on to recommend a new strategic direction for CASA, calling for a more 'collaborative relationship on a foundation of mutual trust and respect'. It is here that I would respectfully sound a note of caution to the minister. I certainly agree that it is important for a regulated industry, like aviation, to have constructive and respectful relations between the regulator and the industry; but I would be very concerned if the relationship between CASA and aviation operators became too close. I expressed this concern to David Forsyth, who the minister ensured—and I thank him for this—gave me a verbal review as well, and we were able to have a very constructive discussion about it. If I could, I would like to express some caution. I think that, by definition, a regulator must have a bit of tension with those people who it is regulating, particularly in aviation.
The term 'trainspotters' is pretty familiar to people; in aviation there are 'plane spotters'. They think that they know best, and they do not want to be told by any regulator that they do not know how to keep their plane safe. But the truth is that the incidents that have occurred in this country have occurred particularly with small planes, which are involved in incidents all too regularly. I think one of the worst parts of the job of being the aviation minister in this country is the fact that you get notified in real time. Except for the minister, people are probably unaware of that. I have had phone calls at all hours telling me that a plane with two or three people on board has gone missing. When the departmental head rang, or in the case of Mr McCormick there was often direct contact, you really did not want to receive that call.

If I could sound that cautious note, as I expressed to David Forsyth: the customers are not the people who own the planes; the customers of CASA and aviation safety are the people on the planes and the people who would be impacted if there were an incident. Planes fly over my house at far too regular intervals. My electorate is the second smallest geographically; Wentworth is the smallest. These areas have highly dense populations. If there were an incident in these most densely populated areas of Australia, it would have an impact not just on people on the planes but on people in the vicinity of an airport. If I could express that concern—that we must never sacrifice rigour for harmony.

I agree with the minister that the actions of the regulator must be firm, and they must also be fair. But the minister has a responsibility to hold the line against industry pressure. We must maintain the necessary tension between the regulator and the regulated to keep all parties on their toes. If they are on their toes then they are focused on what matters: the safety of the travelling public. If they were allowed to operate too closely and without appropriate distance, the public would be the loser. So, while doing all we can to promote professional dealings among all participants in the industry, our overriding responsibility is to make accident prevention and proper safety standards our primary concern. All other concerns must be further down the ladder.
And on the subject of the TSBC/bureau peer review - more weasel words laced with barely hidden malice & hypocrisy:
I note the minister's comment that he is considering asking the ATSB to reopen the investigation into the Pel-Air incident of 2009. This follows the findings this week of the delayed report of the inquiry that I commissioned as the minister, which was conducted by the Canadian Transportation Safety Board. I note that the TSB found that the ATSB investigation methods were best practice, but I certainly welcome, as I previously said, the principle that, if there is any doubt at all, there is a need to take that precautionary principle into consideration.

I am concerned that the government has required aviation operators to cut about $12 million from their costs as part of its push to reduce so-called red tape. I also note that the government has made a similar demand of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority. You cannot have organisations like CASA and AMSA, which perform such an extraordinarily important role in this country, and continue to put pressure on them to cut costs. AMSA has a critical role to play, as we have seen with the issue of the Malaysia Airlines search and rescue. AMSA looks after about one-third of the world's surface, so it is an absolutely critical agency. I do believe that there is a real case for quarantining it from cuts for aviation safety.
This from the man who totally ignored the Senate AAI inquiry findings, while deviously & singlehandedly inflicting budgetary cuts to the bureau that has led to the loss of 200+ years of investigatory expertise:


I think we can safely say that Albo was the No1. fan for the Beaker/McSkull instigated BASR, Big R regulator philosophy for embuggerance of the GA industry....steam still ON!

MTF...
Sarcs is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2014, 20:34
  #1537 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,400
The Ministers and Opposition speeches makes it perfectly clear that the the possibility that a revitalized aviation sector might generate investment, jobs and economic growth in Australia is ignored by both parties. It is now certain that the aviation industry, especially the GA and recreational sectors of it, will remain in terminal decline.

I had hoped that the Ministers speech would have contained words to the effect that a strong, growing and vibrant aviation sector was important for the Australian economy but no. The closest he got was the use of the word "competitive", competitive with what?


I think I see the overall theme here that I missed before; CASA is charged with keeping the Australian public safe from aviation.]

CASAs function is thus characterised by both parties as :

(1) Ensuring passengers on airlines don't die in a screaming death plunge and,

(2) Preventing crazy pilots in all other little aircraft from making their own screaming death plunge into the members of the general public below them.

If in the process their actions destroy businesses and the investment, jobs and potential economic growth they provide....stiff.

That is what I read out of the speech quoted below:

The role of the regulator is a difficult one. CASA serves not only the industry but the public more broadly.

CASA is part of a system which is charged with protecting all passengers, their crew and the community. Members of the travelling public are not usually able to make their own individual assessments of safety issues and rely on the regulatory system for assurance.

Aviation services can be complex and expensive operations. The business environment in which aviation operates is a challenging and often highly competitive one with fluctuating market conditions. Even well-established and well intentioned aviation operators can encounter problems.

In such a complex environment the Government expects the regulator to be firm but fair in how it conducts its role.
The embuggerance will now continue redoubled. Jabiru is the latest victim to be slaughtered along with the Recreational Aircraft Association. Good work CASA, all the jobs at Jabiru will go along with a thousand now useless recreational aircraft and the association that administered them. In fact there will probably be more casualties,, for without a self administering body like the RAA to give recreational aircraft a home, how can they be regulated and rendered flyable?
Sunfish is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2014, 21:13
  #1538 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Styx Houseboat Park.
Posts: 2,053
Is this your happy face??, is it?...

Gee whiz; crumbs Sunny dire predictions will only come true if, and it's a big IF industry allows it. So far the industry has shown no signs of scampering away, tail between legs, from the fight. In fact industry is ahead on points as we approach the last couple of rounds, the legs are still good, plenty of wind and lots of sting left in the jabs.

We are all very well aware of the problems and the ways in which thing may be twisted to suit a purpose. So far, this has been prevented; now is the time for solutions and the weeding out of those imbued with the McComic perversion and methodology.

Cheer up mate, the sky is firmly in place and hopefully about to become a much better place.

Toot toot......

Turn that frown upside down.
Kharon is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2014, 23:30
  #1539 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,400
Kharon, the Minister went out of his way to deny that the regulator had any duty of care whatsoever to those regulated.

Until such time as the regulator is required to take into account the likely effect of its actions on the economic health of the industry it regulates, then the option remains open to it to fulfil its role by prohibiting aviation - the "safe skies are empty skies" option, as is currently being used on Jabiru.

There is no suggestion whatsoever that the iron heel is going to be taken off our necks. My guess is that the full weight of the unmodified European Union over regulation is going to be used to crush the life out of us.
Sunfish is offline  
Old 4th Dec 2014, 02:48
  #1540 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
Posts: 3,052
It’s interesting that even Phil Hurst has been sucked in by all the smoke and mirrors.

I have to hand it to governments: They’ll never go broke underestimating the credulity of punters.
Creampuff is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.