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Truss: Aviation Safety Regulation Review

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Truss: Aviation Safety Regulation Review

Old 12th Oct 2014, 20:22
  #1301 (permalink)  
 
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Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Creampuff:

Face it everyone: It's always about base politics, not high principle.
Therefore we need a cleanskin non pilot to start an "aviation enthusiasts party" that we can vote for with a mission to influence the composition of the Senate.

You do that not by getting your own candidate elected, you do it by preference deals to make sure your target is NOT elected.

Where and what are the marginal seats such a party could target?
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Old 12th Oct 2014, 22:08
  #1302 (permalink)  
 
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Creampuff. Once again you have identified a problem which most all would agree with. Now, can one assume yourself and your banal associate, have approached the non major party aligned Senators. May we know what their response to you was?
I doubt, that there would have been a Senate inquiry, a review, or an overseas audit, without some prompting by someone, (possibly you two), and further I believe PPRuNe has played a vital part up to the hiatus we now find ourselves at.
As for Dick, I believe your encouragement lacks sincerity. Perhaps reference to beads and blankets is not the best way to get him on board. Ridicule would, in my opinion, cement the reasons he gave up last time and probably be treated with contempt and have the opposite effect. Some may engineer that to achieve such an aim.


Sunfish. There is a plethora of "independants" (small i), who will probably suffer the same fate as any other "single issue" mob at the next election. I believe the "electability" and "preference issue" will be addressed by both major party's before then.
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Old 13th Oct 2014, 20:30
  #1303 (permalink)  
 
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If the Laborials can't manage to get legislative amendments through to undo the above-the-line preference swap mechanism (that was, ironically, originally intended to ensure minor candidates' preferences always ended up in the same place - a Laborial), there might be a chance of getting some influence through the Senate election process. Given that the Laborials are just that - a 'unity ticket' on this issue - the likelihood is, unfortunately, that the amendments will be pushed through. Assuming they aren't...

Register a political party. Call it anything you like e.g. the Aviation Promotion Party. The name just needs to be recognisable to anyone involved in anything to do with aviation. The rest don't care. All the party needs is a few hundred members and, hopefully, at least one candidate for each State, the NT and ACT.

Then you encourage anyone and everyone connected with aviation to vote APP above the line on the Senate ballot. Simple policies e.g:

- dismantle CASA and rebuild the regulatory structure from the ground up.
- kill, cremate and bury the regulatory reform Frankenstein, and adopt the NZ rules
- turn airports back into airports.

Behind the scenes the key is to do preference swap deals with other minor parties/independents with similar aims/interests/philosophies. That way, whatever way the preferences flow, there's a greater likelihood of electing candidates with APP sympathies.

The APP will, of course, be internally divided and eventually disintegrate due to the egos involved. But all it needs is a few years with a government's nuts in a Senate deadlock vise, to get fundamental changes to the aviation sector.
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Old 13th Oct 2014, 20:50
  #1304 (permalink)  
 
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Creampuff:

The APP will, of course, be internally divided and eventually disintegrate due to the egos involved. But all it needs is a few years with a government's nuts in a Senate deadlock vise, to get fundamental changes to the aviation sector.
Correction, all it needs is the threat of placing a Governments nuts in a vice.

Truss and his ilk on both sides of politics will receive very unfavourable attention from their compatriots if they are deemed responsible for creating an electoral irritation like the APP.

Is there enough interest in the aviation community to create such a beast?
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Old 13th Oct 2014, 21:46
  #1305 (permalink)  
 
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RTR, airports & political expediency??

I noted with interest the fact that the government rep chosen to speak at the RAAA conference was the Parliamentary Secretary to the minister for industry...

Some may say this is typical of government (past & present) obvious dis-interest in all things aviation but on a quick perusal of Bob Baldwin's CV it is quite obvious this man is not a light weight in political circles, the man is a doer rather than (like Wuss) a snoozer...

Now the doomsayers may also say - "so what"- & that this is just more political posturing from the laborials but IMO this is an obvious sign that the government RTRB (Red Tape Reduction Brigade), of which BB is heavily involved, has been tasked with getting stuck into the 20+ year mess that is Fort Fumble's RRP...

As noted in Progressive's thread here, yesterday FF quietly/stealthily.... released their contribution to the RTR program - Red Tape Reduction and Audit :
The Australian Government has committed to a red tape reduction programme to boost productivity growth and enhance competitiveness across the Australian economy. One component of the programme is to undertake an audit of all regulations and estimate the compliance cost for a sample of those regulations. Further information about the red tape reduction programme can be found at: Cutting Red Tape website.
Some of the spin & bulldust in the FF Ranking of Regulations (28KB) is truly vomitus....& perhaps deserves further comment on here but for a simple summary here is the Oz Flying take:
CASA Calls for Input to Regulatory Burden Rankings -
13 Oct 2014



CASA has called for industry input in to the regulatory burden rankings as part of the Australian Government's Red Tape Reduction program.
The regulator has posted a list on it's website and ranked each Civil Aviation Safety Regulation (CASR) or Civil Aviation Regulation (CAR) according to whether or not it sees the burden on industry as High, Medium or Low. The industry has been invited to submit their own rankings.
CASA's initial rankings were based on:
  • the type of requirements the regulation imposes
  • the complexity of the regulation
  • the reach of the regulation
  • the frequency of interactions with the regulation
  • currency of review
  • scope for reform.
Some of the rankings are likely to cause controversy as the CASA list appears to be at odds with what the industry believes is excessive burden. The following CASRs, which have proven contentious since introduction, have all been ranked as having low burden on the aviation industry.

CASR Part 141- Flight training other than integrated courses
CASR Part 142- Integrated and multi-crew flight training courses
CASR Part 147- Continuing airworthiness, maintenance training organisations
CASR Part 66- Aircraft engineer licences and ratings
CASR Part 61- Licensing has been ranked medium burden on the CASA list and Part 67- medicals has been ranked high burden, which is something
the industry will probably be happy to agree with.
The rankings list and instructions for input are all on the CASA website.
Strange world of Politics - On another front (i.e. Airports) there was a media release (13/10/14) put out by the miniscule on funding for Pormpuraaw Airport: WT204/2014

The funding contribution from the Fed/State government was..

"...The $1.04 million project was jointly funded by the Australian Government which invested $790,000 and the Queensland Government which contributed $250,000..."

...meanwhile, just last week, in a positive development for Coober Pedy.. :
Coober Pedy gets runway upgrade, keeps Rex service

Construction on widening the runway at Coober Pedy Airport will commence in November after the project secured state funding, in a move that ensures Regional Express (Rex) will be able to maintain services from Adelaide using Saab 340 aircraft.

The South Australian government has backed $1.3 million project to widen the runway to 30 metres, from 18 metres currently, so it will meet international regulations.

Coober Pedy district council mayor Steve Baines said the council was ready to begin work once the paperwork was settled.

“The threat to our vital air service has been lifted,” Cr Baines said in a statement.

“Losing the Rex flights would have killed off the tourism industry and had major impact on the residents of Coober Pedy and surrounding areas. Council and I are delighted that this has been resolved.”

Figures from the SA government showed 75 per cent of passengers on flights to Coober Pedy were visitors to the town.

SA transport and infrastructure minister Stephen Mulligan said the runway upgrade would allow regular passengers services to continue unrestricted to Coober Pedy.

“The prospect of losing commercial flights to Coober Pedy was unacceptable to the South Australian Government,” Mulligan said.
The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) said on September 4 aspects of the current arrangements for Rex to operate to Coober Pedy did not provide the “appropriate continued management of safety on an 18-metre sealed runway with gravel edges”.

“CASA believes it is in the best interests of the travelling public to introduce new safety standards for all narrow runway operations across Australia, including Coober Pedy,” CASA said.

CASA said Rex would be permitted to operate into Coober Pedy while the runway widening work was carried out.

“It should be noted that leading aviation nations such as the United States, Europe and New Zealand do not allow narrow runway operations under the arrangements that have been in place in Australia,” CASA said.

“However, CASA believes it is in the interests of the Coober Pedy community to allow these flights to continue in the short-term because any restrictions could cause social and economic disruption.”
So the miniscule dodged a bullet there...

While in Victoria there was another airports & politics issue, from the - Last Minute Hitch: 10 October 2014:
The $1 million grant to Tyabb is causing some controversy, as it is the home club of Minister Gordon Rich-Phillips. Naturally, the opposition is calling it a conflict of interest and saying the airport doesn't qualify under the guidelines of the fund. Firstly, Rich-Phillips has stated that he took the conflict to the Department of Premier and Cabinet and washed his hands of the grant. That was absolutely the right thing to do, and it is what the Labor Party would be saying he should have done had he not done it. Secondly, the aviation fund is for regional airports be they public or private ... it says so in the guidelines.

But, the biggest question in my mind comes when you reverse the situation. Should Tyabb have been excluded from funding because the minister was a member? That doesn't seem fair to me; Tyabb has the right to apply the same as any airport does. As for the issue of the airport being privately-run, where were Labor's slings and arrows when Lethbridge was given a motza to seal their runway? I wonder if we'd even be reporting this story were a state election not coming up in November.
The strange..strange world of politics...

MTF...
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Old 14th Oct 2014, 08:44
  #1306 (permalink)  
 
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Alliance - Get on with it

From AA today...: Alliance backs ASRR recommendations
Alliance Aviation Services managing director Scott McMillan has called on the government to get on with acting on the 37 recommendations of the recently published review into Australia’s aviation sector.

McMillan told shareholders at Alliance’s annual general meeting the Aviation Safety Regulation Review (ASRR) had identified a wide range of recommendations that would benefit the industry.

“We look forward to the Commonwealth government implementing the wide range of recommendations from the recently published Aviation Safety Regulation Review,” McMillan said in prepared remarks on Tuesday.

“These much needed changes will go a long way towards reducing the unnecessary regulatory burden and inefficiency that our industry had endured for many years.”

The ASRR was commissioned by the federal government and authored by former Airservices chairman David Forsyth, former Director-General of Civil Aviation at Transport Canada Don Spruston and former Head of Safety at British Airways Roger Whitefield. The report, published in June, called for substantial cultural and structural change at the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), as well as better leadership of and coordination between Australia’s aviation safety agencies.

It noted that Australia had an “excellent” airline safety record and an “advanced” aviation regulatory system.

However, there were “opportunities for the system to be improved to ensure Australia remains a leading aviation state”.

The federal government has pledged to respond to the review’s 37 recommendations before the end of 2014.

Meanwhile, Alliance chairman Steve Padgett said Alliance was the current economic environment brought with it some challenges.

“We also must accept that we are operating in a competitive environment and we need to continually meet the needs of our customers,” Padgett said.

“As a result we remain focused on the development of the new revenue resources for Alliance and looking for opportunities to diversify the business and sources of revenue.”
MTF...
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Old 14th Oct 2014, 11:21
  #1307 (permalink)  
 
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Oh yes, good ol Scotty Mac. He never did think to highly of fort fumble, and to be honest he probably had good reason. I do recall one particular CASA inspector who was ex Alliance who would at any opportunity make his former employer go through living hell over any and all small and insignificant issues. He was more vengeful than Osama bin laden in New York City!!!
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Old 14th Oct 2014, 11:40
  #1308 (permalink)  
 
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Soteria,

More vengeful than Osama Bin Laden in New York is a terrible thing to say! To equate the actions of a minor public servant to the actions of a purely evil man with no regard for human life is sickening.

Your comment is offensive! Especially to those who have lost loved ones to terrorism!
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Old 14th Oct 2014, 13:57
  #1309 (permalink)  
 
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More vengeful than Osama Bin Laden in New York is a terrible thing to say! To equate the actions of a minor public servant to the actions of a purely evil man with no regard for human life is sickening.

Your comment is offensive! Especially to those who have lost loved ones to terrorism!
.....well I for one wasn't offended. We really are becoming a bubble rap society.
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 11:55
  #1310 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
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Cartel

DB,

Get over yourself and grab a Kleenex. Wipe your eyes. Those comments of Soteria were merely an analogy. When you consider the cartel and protection regime, largely sponsored by MrDak for CASA & the ATSB, I agree with the frustrations of other IOSS members. Why don't you focus your efforts on the real issue at hand, the cartel?

Last edited by Jinglie; 15th Oct 2014 at 12:53.
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Old 17th Oct 2014, 02:18
  #1311 (permalink)  
 
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AF sub - “not acceptable under any circumstances’’ except do nothing.

Kudos to SC from the Oz for following up on last week's article - Ex-CASA chief blasts Angel Flight curbs - with this...Angel Flight rails at ‘discrimination’...

It would appear that MT has combined forces with another former heavyweight to help author the 80 odd page AF submission addressing the FF DP1317OS...:
ANGEL Flight has urged the Civil Aviation Safety Authority to abandon its “proposed regulatory discrimination’’ in a lengthy submission that warns any move to make the charity organisation a regulator or part of a regulated authority would be unworkable.

The organisation, which has the backing of senior aviation ­figures such as former CASA boss Mick Toller and former Virgin Blue chief pilot John Raby, lodged an 80-page document that urges CASA to review its own licensing and maintenance regime if it ­believes it is inadequate.

The submission is in response to a CASA discussion paper into safety standards for voluntary community service flights such as those operated by Angel Flight carrying disadvantaged regional patients and their families to medical centres.

CASA stirred up a hornet’s nest in regional Australia by expressing a preference for an option that would see an organisation formed to assess and authorise ­pilots, require proficiency checks and assessments and approve aircraft types. It ­argues it could monitor safety standards under the system without imposing undue regulatory burdens such as an air operator’s certificate.

It has since emphasised that it may not proceed with any changes that would affect Angel Flight but made no apologies for canvassing safety issues.

Angel Flight’s submission rejected all options as “not acceptable under any circumstances’’, except the one to do nothing.

It noted that there have been no safety issues identified by CASA in 84,500 flights {Hmm..flight hours maybe Steve??} flown by volunteer pilots in the 16,900 flights Angel Flight has facilitated since its ­inception. It said the ­organisation “could not and would not” become a regulatory authority or part of one.

“Angel Flight has approximately 6000 volunteer drivers and pilots,’’ it said. “To become ­either a regulator or a regulated aviation body would be unworkable due to the expense, skills and training required to regulate, administer, or comply, as an aviation organisation, with an independent aviation regulator, particularly in circumstances where the pilot volunteers have a broad spectrum of licences, skills, endorsements, ratings, and where the different aircraft types would number hundreds.

“Moreover, where pilots and their aircraft are dispersed across the entire nation, often in remote locations, the training and checking regimes would be a financial and practical impossibility: that is the job of the government regulator, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority — not a registered charity.’’ The submission said the charity’s mercy missions were private flights operating under rules set by CASA.

If CASA was satisfied with its current standards, there was no need to create a special category dedicated to the type of people flown or the purpose of the flight.

“Angel flights are not ambulance flights,’’ it said. “They are not commercial flights. They are not airline transport or RPT flights. They are private flights conducted under the rules relating to such flights as set by CASA. Provided pilots comply with these rules, there is no need for intervention. If pilots fail to comply with relevant rules, then they are subject to the administrative, regulatory and/or criminal sanctions that apply to them as individuals.’’

In his submission to CASA, Mr Raby accused the authority of a flawed approach that drew “sweeping conclusions” from an analysis of the one fatal accident Angel Flight had suffered in some 17,000 flights.

Mr Raby disputed that community service organisations were insufficiently regulated and said issues raised by CASA as germane to community service flights were relevant to all flying operations.

“There is simply no credible measure presented which indicates targeted activity presents a safety risk above and beyond that inherent in all general aviation activity,’’ he said.
Mr Raby don't you know by now that FF are simply not interested in empirical evidence that proves a safety issue is really a non-issue...

Oh well hopefully FF will soon make the DP submissions publicly available, it could make for some fascinating reading...

RAAA convention wrap & other related matters:

In Dougy's insight this week he gives a summary of the RAAA convention..: Editor's Insights 16 October 2014

The bit that amused me was the part on Tezza's speech, which apparently went down like a fart in an elevator with the delegates..:
Acting DAS Terry Farquharson delivered a sober defence of the Regulator which didn’t go down so well with industry delegates. I was surprised that Terry would front the RAAA given that he’s just keeping the seat warm until the new DAS is named (any day now). So I guess it was a courageous appearance, even if a bit out of tune with the mood of the audience.
While on the new DAS position SC in another article - New CASA chief on final approach - apparently has the goss that the former FAA heavyweight has suddenly got cold feet & pulled the pin.. :
A NEW head of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority is expected to be announced in the next two weeks, government sources have confirmed.

The announcement comes after the appointment was apparently delayed by a false start in which a US candidate favoured for the job is understood to have withdrawn his application.

It is believed the new candidate is local and the appointment is due to go before Cabinet towards the end of the month.
Which is certainly strange because rumour was, that even after reading the ASRR report (& possibly PPRuNe) etc..etc., that this gentleman was very much relishing the opportunity to clean out the FF trough & dismantle the iron ring; I think there is a little more to this sudden withdrawal by said preferred candidate...

Moving on...SC also gives Paul Tyrell from the RAAA the opportunity to provide a bit of a wrap on the convention last week..:
The appointment and the safety review response were hot topics at last week’s annual convention of the Regional Aviation Association of Australia.

Association chief executive Paul Tyrrell welcomed the news that an appointment of a new CASA director of aviation safety was imminent, and said the appointment of industry veteran Jeff Boyd to the CASA board was also a tick for the government.

“The rest of the board hasn’t been appointed and that’s something we really need,” Mr Tyrrell said.

“The government’s response to the ASRR is also eagerly awaited.’’

Mr Tyrell also called on Mr Truss to follow through on the “long-awaited’’ ministerial advisory council that was part of the ­coalition’s aviation election platform. He said his association’s conference also heard that the Part 61 pilot licensing rules were continuing to cause angst “not because it’s a bad regulation but because it was rushed and the education program hasn’t been well managed’’.

However, the interaction with CASA on changes to parts 135 and 121 appeared to be much better.

On the safety review, Mr Tyrrell said the industry had responded months ago with almost as many submissions as had been lodged initially. “So there’s a huge amount of data and feedback they’ve got,’’ he said.
“They know exactly what the industry thinks, so we’re hoping the government’s working very hard on the response.’’

More generally, Mr Tyrrell said a theme of the convention had been to avoid talking down the ­industry. “We have a lot of international visitors and they commented that it always appears a struggle in the Australian aviation industry and they don’t get that in other parts of the world,’’ he said. “So we’ve got to be careful we don’t get too enmeshed in the problems and fail to look to the future.’’

He said this meant encouraging young people into the industry and looking beyond Australia’s shores to see where the local industry could engage and add value with what was essentially an international industry.

“We’re trying not be too gloomy,’’ he said.

“It’s more that it’s sort of a limbo period at the moment.’’
Hmm.. IMO this statement by PT on why Part 61 continues to cause angst...

“not because it’s a bad regulation but because it was rushed and the education program hasn’t been well managed’’

...is nothing more than a load of bollocks.. Perhaps PT should get out more, stop listening to the crat-spin and have a chat to some of the other TAAAF members, especially Aerialag Phil who has been quite vocal in regards to the Part 61 monster - Pilot licensing rules put aviation sector in a tailspin...

“I think the industry will give you a pretty firm view that this is just so overcomplicated for the task it does that we’ve actually gone backwards,’’ he said.

“I’d challenge anyone to get their head around the 800 pages of regulations and clearly enunciate how all of those rules work ­together.’

Phil (or SC) could probably put PT in touch with this bloke for a real at the coalface perspective on Part 61:
A veteran flying training operator with almost four decades in the industry said there was a lack of background, forms that didn’t yet exist and information that was still in draft form.

“The industry is crying,’’ the operator said.

He said the industry had been promised there would be no ­additional cost but there were “horrific costs involved’’.

“There are government guidelines saying there should be the removal of red tape, that there should be stuff done in simple ­language,’’ he said.

“Everything’s been done in legal speak again that we can’t understand.

There are actually things in different parts of the regs that contravene each other.’’
Maybe PT was misquoted or he had a few too many Chardy's but either way IMO that statement does not enhance the credibility of the RAAA...

MTF...
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Old 17th Oct 2014, 06:20
  #1312 (permalink)  
 
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"Amen"-Delayed due technical difficulties..

Nice to see the Rev. on song and leading the faithful toward salvation, but as usual the forces of evil won't go away, because one good man says they must, will they now children??. Bit like children's belief in the Bogey Man; it's all well and good for Mummy to tell the kids not to worry, no such thing: but when things go bump in the night and the murky Machiavellian crew are out to hunt and haunt – Mum's glib remarks seem somehow – inadequate.

Sarcs # 1412 - Rev Forsyth – "However, trust between Australia’s aviation players and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) would take longer, Forsyth says."
Oh; Just a bit of it – and the 'powers that be' – are not helping to regain the trust which is an absolute given in ant decent relationship. The persistent rumour that Farq-u-hardson is tu tu be DAS is just a starter; seems the FAA high roller has pulled the pin, if the reports, quotes and rumours floating about the place are true. Whether these are just a 'sampler' to see what the general reaction is; or, that the FAA are coming – mob handed and there is a conflict of interest; or, as Sarcs mentioned, the mutt has read PPRuNe and decided the game is not worth the candle, are just some of the speculations in the wind today. Lets make it clear – the boss of the Golden West Mafia (GWM) his cronies, catamites and sycophants are unacceptable; at any level. They are perceived as being the radical cause of most of the surface level 'trust' issues which have, through the McComic Regime brought the administration and management of Australian aviation to this sorry impasse.

To add fuel to the flames, the idiots who 'developed' Part 61 are begging industry assistance to sort out the unbelievable mess. If this industry wants to survive it must tell the CASA to take 61 away, do the homework and impact statements we paid them to do, re-write the regulation, seek industry consultation and then, suggest a proper period of adjustment, education and assistance to bed the revised law down. As it stands Part 61 is open slather on operators, exemptions, instruments , 'accommodations'; all 'at discretion'. It's bollocks and they have the hide to expect industry to fish their chestnuts out of the flames – after having paid the fools to write it. Your response to the pitiful CASA cries for assistance should be a simple one: - "We paid for it, you stuffed it, now, stick it where the sun don't shine; bring it back fixed; or, pay us for the time we must spend sorting out your amateurish, second rate work". Fools, shiftless, lazy, incompetent, purblind bloody fools and sneaky with it.

Trust the current outfit ? fix up 61 for them?? – what strange, whimsical notions.

Last edited by Kharon; 17th Oct 2014 at 06:21. Reason: Slowly catching up – MTF..
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Old 17th Oct 2014, 09:44
  #1313 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
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Last minute Hitch on RTR FF rankings & that caravan.

Good to see you back Mr Ferryman....it was a bit quiet around here without you...

This week in the last minute Hitch...:
One thing CASA doesn't lack is the courage to pick up a stick and ram it hard into the side of a large bear. They've done it again with their rankings of regulatory burden. CASR Parts 66 and 147 have been ranked low burden, whilst CASR Part 145 has been ranked as medium burden. The maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) industry may consider all of this as high burden in their review, if their past stance on these suites is any indicator. On the upside, CASA has ranked Part 67 on medicals as high burden. Those with long memories, however, will recall the Byron days when the burden was officially recognised, resulting in nothing happening at all. Same under McCormick, so we have to question if this high ranking for Part 67 means anything of substance. We have the opportunity to send CASA our own rankings, but we need to be honest and resist the temptation to rank everything as high burden; that would give CASA an excuse to ignore our input.

Richard Rudd and Rob Cumming's Caravan to Canberra expedition highlights where the general aviation industry is at with the regulator: they've had enough. Richard and Rob will arrive in the capital this weekend bringing exactly that message on a mobile billboard. It's true that there is not a lot they can tell politicians that the politicians haven't been told before, and although they will get a sympathetic ear from supporters, they'll still get a deaf ear from CASA. However, Richard and Rob are doing something rather than just sitting and complaining, and you've got to applaud that.

Qantas Founders Museum has added a Super Connie to their museum in Longreach, The aircraft has been derelict in The Philippines for years, so it will need a good clean-up and restoration before taking up its spot beside the B707 and B747 already there. The Connie is a significant aircraft for Qantas and a vital addition to their collection. What might have been nice is if the announcement had been about flying a B767 up there instead of consigning them all to the graveyards in the USA. There might still be time for them to consider this, although Qantas might not feel the 76 deserves a place in their history, despite being their first Extended Twin Engine Operations (ETOPS) aircraft and having the first glass cockpits in the Qantas fleet. There's also the matter of money; they might still be able to sell some of them given the economy they still represent.

May your gauges always be in the green,

Hitch
Hmm...no comment..

MTF...

psss if you want to know more about FF's dodgy regulatory burden rankings go here and please think about calling bollocks by making a response as I suggested...

"...Perhaps those IOS members contemplating responding to the FF bollocks - FF self-assessed RTR audit results - should cc to the OBPR, PC, PMC, TA & his Parliamentary Secretary Josh Frydenberg..."

Last edited by Sarcs; 17th Oct 2014 at 09:59.
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Old 17th Oct 2014, 20:52
  #1314 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
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Disinformation minefield. A good read.

Soteria - "It's time for you to go bye byes, please. And one other thing - take Boyd, Campbell, Ferrit-a-day, Gibson and Wodger with you and please don't bang the door on the way out, ok?
What a way to start the day watching that crew being run out town on a rail, Sot, you omitted a few from the IOS hit-list, such as W2 and a couple from the AWI team; but, I hear the AFP are actively interested in some matters. Perhaps it's all going to get 'interesting'.

Jinglie "[And} an interesting anecdote, was Sleepy actually interviewed for his Deputy job or just appointed by his mate Herr Screamer??
Asked a couple of the BRB about that – seems old mate wanted to stay over in the West and play in his sand pit with the rest of his 'mates', but McComic 'persuaded' him to return to the East. This was the radical McComic philosophy which was to release those permanently assigned to pencil sharpening duties, by more reasonable men to 'active' duty. The classic statement being along the lines of "well, if they have annoyed the industry that badly, they must be doing their jobs properly". And so it came to pass that the GWM was formed and the creatures from the dark forest were released to become part of the 'like minded' crew which would perform their antics to satisfy their masters every whim. MM's hand picked selection of their master was, despite howls of protest from more honourable, qualified folk supported by Albo – who signed the infamous Big R carte blanche. Unlike Pandora, who at least could claim ignorance as a defence, Albo knew exactly what he was unleashing. The rest as they say – history and Hansard.

Sunny – "By my way of thinking, it is not a good idea for CASA management to assume that the Government will continue to put up with their antics."
Gee whiz Sunny – I'd like to think so, the inclusion of Bob Baldwin at RAAA lends some valid support for the argument, the rumours related to the next estimates, if true, may prove 'interesting'. It's passing strange, nearly every minister and department seem to be really trying to genuinely get things moving – or so the rhetoric suggests; but, as you quite rightly pointed out (way back) should the government decide to make an example of one department, to pull the rest into gear, CASA would be the perfect place to start. We can only hope.

Sarcs – "Or you could refer to the following leaked response to the DP from the former CAsA boss Mick Toller."
I never minded Mick Toller too much, sure he was hard headed and the title Ayatollah was used more in jest than in anger, he was at least fair minded and sane. I doubt he, like Byron would have allowed the current AF mess to develop. As he says in the Angel flight debate – it's a bollocks. The whole thing has been generated by a department desperately seeking a way to reassert their relevance to aviation by picking on yet another soft target. You have admire their determination to bully and subjugate the minority groups as an example to the larger, Tiger, CVD, Angel flight etc. Disgusting creatures.

Sarcs – "Some may say this is typical of government (past & present) obvious dis-interest in all things aviation but on a quick perusal of Bob Baldwin's CV it is quite obvious this man is not a light weight in political circles, the man is a doer rather". etc.
This kind of supports the Sunny assertions that an example will be made, but it's also supporting the rumour that the minuscule has been reduced to a Qld election bulwark. Only allowed, under strict adult supervision to make speeches at tennis courts and pat small children. The general dismay at the complete lack of action – on any matter within his portfolio – is starting to raise some very smart eyebrows, the WTF is he doing question becoming a daily mantra – the answer is of course – 'Sod all'.

Sarcs – thanks for the Hitch link – interesting. Why I am not surprised at the CASA signed confession, that a CP is only valued at AUD $35 ph, or that they have no clue about the impact their Frankenstein has on the cost of doing business with CASA. I believe part of their remit is to do a cost/benefit analysis (impact) of new regulation. The Muppets supporting Part 61 certainly did no such thing, and now they want 'us' to analyse the ducking thing and report back. How flaming condescending, arrogant, ignorant of them and how very obliging of us to once again, unquestioningly, to do their bidding (and work) at our expense.

I will only join the Creampuff Laborial Aviation Party (CLAP) if pink bunny suits are made mandatory (strict liability – no option); what a hoot – bet they never saw a sight like that – in daylight at least - coming up the drive to parliament house..Led by the R&R ute, with the hand painted signs and VH- F#c^D flying overhead. ...

Toot toot.

Last edited by Kharon; 17th Oct 2014 at 21:01. Reason: And sometimes - I just sits.
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Old 17th Oct 2014, 20:57
  #1315 (permalink)  
 
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Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Which is certainly strange because rumour was, that even after reading the ASRR report (& possibly PPRuNe) etc..etc., that this gentleman was very much relishing the opportunity to clean out the FF trough & dismantle the iron ring; I think there is a little more to this sudden withdrawal by said preferred candidate...
My guess would be that the last hurdle was an interview with Mr. Mrdak and perhaps a Ministerial advisor at which the FAA person was told:

(a) You are not being appointed to "reform" CASA, you are being appointed to appear to reform CASA in order to silence CASAs critics.

(b) You do not have authority from me to reform anything. You must not make waves or cause the Government or me and my department any trouble at all.

This is the trouble with Americans in management....they actually want to DO SOMETHING..... and we can't have that, can we?
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Old 17th Oct 2014, 21:37
  #1316 (permalink)  
 
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Sunny,

I think you perhaps have hit the old nail squarely on the head.

Mrdak is an absolute piece of work. His Machiavellian fingers have fiddled in many pies from engineering the sell off of GA airports, to pink bats.

He tried to influence the DAS selection at the start but was thwarted when people started asking questions about transparency. People like him do not give up easily, I would not be surprised at all if the fiddle went in.

The man has no soul, illustrated, I'm told when confronted by the flight nurse from the Pelair debacle seeking assistance from someone, anyone, to obtain some reasonable support for her ongoing medical issues, he brushed her off like she was a piece of cow sh..t stuck to his trousers, not even a kind word of sympathy.
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Old 17th Oct 2014, 23:40
  #1317 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Go west young man
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The 3Ms (i.e.Murky Machiavellian Manipulation)

TB - I think you perhaps have hit the old nail squarely on the head.

Mrdak is an absolute piece of work. His Machiavellian fingers have fiddled in many pies from engineering the sell off of GA airports, to pink bats.
Ah yes the sticky fingers of M&M, behind closed doors, yet again manipulating the many & various two-bit players for his own self-serving, self-preserving reasons... The most worrying thing is that this bloke has a key to the PM&C vault and has probably already corrupted many of the seriously smart individuals from that office...

The other problem is that although (in the case of the DAS selection) M&M is waiting the outcome of plan B; if that doesn't work he probably has back up plans all the way out to Z...

Kharon - I believe part of their remit is to do a cost/benefit analysis (impact) of new regulation.
This obfuscation and poor administration by FF of their obligations to the OBPR for all new/amended regulations was, among many other issues, highlighted in the REX ASRR submission:
The Australian Government’s handbook on Best Practice Regulation states that
stimulating productivity remains at the forefront of government policy. It also states
that the centrepiece of the Government’s best practice legislation is a Regulation
Impact Statement (RIS) that is mandatory for all decisions made by the Australian
Government and its agencies that are likely to have a regulatory impact on business.
Given CASA’s blatant disregard for its regulatory impact on productivity and the
inadequate or non existent RIS that accompanies each regulatory proposal, CASA is
clearly not following this process but is seemingly a law unto itself.
The resulting increased cost to industry without any demonstrated safety benefit is
felt to be a significant factor in the declining regional aviation sector. The regulatory
barriers for entry into this part of the aviation industry are now almost
insurmountable.
&
The Office of Best Practice Regulation (OBPR), in the Department of Prime Minister
and Cabinet, has published a handbook of guidelines [Dept of Finance and
Deregulation, July 2013] for Australian Government agencies involved in regulatory
reform. Any agency that introduces new rules that may have a regulatory impact on
business must first produce a RIS as part of the regulatory process. The OBPR must
be notified and the agency is required to publish an Annual Regulatory Plan. It
appears that CASA does not comply with any of these OBPR mandatory guidelines.
FF back in 2012 did put out a RIS for Part 61 (see here). However it would appear that they did not conduct an amended RIS (as is supposed to happen) to reflect the many & varied amendments/changes to Part 61 since that time...

So our only point of reference is the 2012 RIS that now has outdated figures..

Example SMS set up/ongoing costs for Flying Schools:
Upfront costs
For small businesses employing six or less safety sensitive staff would require an understanding of the safety management system principles and human factor training and the development of safety dataset. CASA has developed a micro SMS tool to assist these businesses.
It is estimated that it would require 2 days for a small business manager to understand SMS principles and a further 2 days training in human factor training for all staff, and 1/2 day to setup an excel spreadsheet for the safety dataset. For small businesses, this would generate an upfront cost of $2689, based on 4.5 days of time valued at the average salary of $128 500 per year and $1600 in human factor training from an external provider for the two days of training, deriving a cost of $4289 per business. In aggregate for the 164 small businesses this would generate a total cost of $0.7m.
For small/medium training businesses employing less than 20 people, the time cost will similar to sole traders with the addition of 2.5 days in time for developing staff training material and an investigation and audit program for the organisation. For individual small organisations this will cost 7 days valued at the average salary of $128 500 per year, generating a cost of $4183 per business, plus $1600 in human factor training from an external provider. In aggregate for the 35 small/medium businesses this will cost a total of $0.2m.
For medium businesses employing up to 50 the time cost will similar to small/medium business, however, the implementation of safety management system will require 2 days in time for developing staff training material and an investigation and audit program for the organisation. For medium businesses the time is estimated at 9 days valued at $5378, plus $1600 in human factor training from an external provider. In aggregate for these 5 businesses this will cost a total of $0.034m.

Ongoing costs
For small businesses, there will be ongoing requirement to demonstrate an understanding the principles of safety management systems and human factors, at a cost of 1 day per year and 1 day to record any safety incident in the database and comply with a safety audit.
The ongoing cost for the SMS will be 2 days per year valued at a salary of $128 500 that is $1195 per small business, plus $800 per year in human factors training, resulting in a total ongoing cost of $1995. With 164 small businesses this is will generate an annual cost of $0.46m.
For small/medium organisations the ongoing costs will be more significant, there will be more safety incidents to report, which will need to be investigated, ongoing risk assessments will be required for assessment of safety risks, developing means of reducing risks and training staff in safety. It is estimated that this will be the equivalent of 20% of the full-time workload for a person nominated as a safety manager within the organisation and when valued at the salary of $128 500, this will cost small/medium businesses approximately $25 700 each year. The human factors training is estimated to cost $800 per employee and assuming 5 employees per business this will cost $4000 per year resulting in a total ongoing cost of $29 700 per business. When aggregated across the 35 small/medium businesses this will generate an ongoing cost of $1.04m.
For training businesses employing up to 50 will be required to perform the same ongoing tasks of a medium sized business, but the additional employees will generate more safety incidents and risks to be assessed and staff to be trained. It is estimated that this will require 40% of the full time workload of one person, valued at $51 400 for each business. The human factors training is estimated to cost $800 per employee and assuming 20 employees per business this will cost $16000 per year resulting in a total ongoing cost of $67 400 per business When aggregated across these 5 businesses this will generate an ongoing cost of $0.34m.
The projected total impact cost to industry was tabled (table 6) on page 16 accompanied by this statement:
Overall Costs
In developing the proposals, CASA has been careful to offset any increased requirements with reductions in other requirements, particularly administrative requirements which have a less direct impact on safety. The total increased costs are estimated to be approximately $8m per year, or $56.3m when discounted over a 10 year period (Table 6).
Oh but the benefits, according to CAsA, will far outweigh the costs..:
Conclusion
In developing the proposals CASA is not introducing a new regulatory regime, but is simply refining the existing requirements. The options, while making some changes to existing requirements, do not introduce any substantial new imposts on the aviation industry and in fact, will alleviate and simplify a significant number of current requirements.

The purpose of the proposals is to provide clear and consistent regulations for licensing flight crew without significantly increasing industry costs, but they do incorporate proposals for systemic changes designed to improve aviation safety.

Whilst there is a strong case for introducing better flight crew training requirements to improve safety, CASA accepts that the cost of flight training is already high. To contain costs there needs to be a reduction in requirements not directly contributing to safety to allow for additional safety targeted measures. In addition, Australia benefits from aligning flight crew licensing requirements closely with international standards.

Wherever possible CASA has sought to reduce administrative requirements in the flight crew licensing system that do not directly contribute to safety, so that other proposals addressing safety issues do not result in a significant cost to industry. Although some sectors of industry will experience modest increases, the overall result should tend to reduce rather than increase costs.
Errr..again no comment..

MTF...

Last edited by Sarcs; 18th Oct 2014 at 01:07.
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Old 18th Oct 2014, 01:45
  #1318 (permalink)  
 
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"The purpose of the proposals is to provide clear and consistent regulations for licensing flight crew without significantly increasing industry costs, but they do incorporate proposals for systemic changes designed to improve aviation safety."

Pity they don't follow their own spin. Until they devote a little time to training their own enforcers, inconsistency will reign supreme. Ten different FOI's ten different opinions, therefore ten different operators conducting operations differently.

If CAsA cant get "Consistency" in their own interpretation and enforcement of the regulations they write, then the biggest thing they could do to assist the industry is to provide generic operations manuals, approved at the highest echelon, that FOI's cannot fiddle with.

That would go a long way to removing inconsistency, and relieve a lot of CP angst, everyone would be operating on the same page. We are all supposed to be complying with the same regulations, to the same standards.

Why should everyone have to be different?

I believe the Ag boys had great success with generic operations manuals under Byron, who would skin an FOI alive if they tried to tamper with it.

The arrival of the skull put paid to that when the rogue FOI's were let off their leads to run rampant through the industry. Might explain Air Ag's anger and frustration today?

Its always seemed to me to be completely inconsistent that many of the costly checks we are required conduct are not common across the industry. For example, a 20:11 check with one operator should be acceptable to another, same for proficiency checks.

I know of one operator who has been inflicted by their FOI with pilot induction requirements that cost upwards of 20K just to employ a pilot for a simple piston twin, and that's for a person current, qualified and experienced.

These sort of impositions and costs are simply unsustainable for the small businesses that GA operators are and do nothing to improve safety.

"Whilst there is a strong case for introducing better flight crew training requirements to improve safety, CASA accepts that the cost of flight training is already high. To contain costs there needs to be a reduction in requirements not directly contributing to safety to allow for additional safety targeted measures. In addition, Australia benefits from aligning flight crew licensing requirements closely with international standards."

I'm not at all sure that we have "Aligned" with international standards.
I have certainly never experienced anything like Part 61 and 142 anywhere else in the world.

These two parts alone positively encourage commercial operators to export their checking and training overseas.

I believe that without the government subsidy of Vets, flying schools in Australia would simply vanish.

Travel around the country airports and count the paint peeling signs for the Galaganbone Aeroclub or the Kickatinalong flying school, empty, but for the spider webs and echo's of memories past.

Contrast us with NZ. How is it they can elucidate a clear, plain language rule set for pilot standards also called part 61 in eighty odd pages,bout the same as the US.

Why does it take our regulator 800 pages of legalise plus a MOS which is supposed to explain the legalize, but in effect makes it about as clear as mud? .

NZ aviation is thriving, their safety record is "World Class" their regulations are being adopted across the region.

Australia is just an international Joke, a pimple on the ass of the aviation world.

If, as I suspect our regulator believes safety is entirely dependent on the volume of regulations, why is our safety record worse than the US? Why is our industry all but dead, when it could be contributing so much to the economy of this country?






Last edited by thorn bird; 18th Oct 2014 at 02:53. Reason: Had to check with Frank if Terry was sober
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Old 18th Oct 2014, 10:00
  #1319 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
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Sunny has it in one.

Busy week with estimates and the CVD case at the AAT.
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Old 18th Oct 2014, 11:04
  #1320 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
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Biccy,

Not to mention the Sky Sentinel debacle, all of which is Tezza's doing. He will be a rabbit in the spotlight this week. He's got Boyd backing him up. He's going to need a lot more than that wimp. The Voodoo man could be going into overdrive with more babble and spin.
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