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View Full Version : AAIB identify reason BMI plane skidded off Bristol Airport runway


acbus1
3rd Feb 2019, 09:28
https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/bmi-plane-skidded-more-100-2414582

December 2017. AAIB report apparently just out.

Skidded off Bristol runway, travelling 120 metres along the grass. Thankfully, nobody hurt, Multiple diversions while it was dug out and moved.

Control was lost by the pilot as the emergency brake was mistakenly selected rather than the speed brake, according to the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB).

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/272x185/emb_console_4aba516c731058e58dcbb2b7bff9ec47ec982166.jpg

Captain under training, As if that's a valid "reason". Or was the Training Captain also under training? (I obviously jest...I hope).

Scotches the "theories" posted on the Spotters Corner forum. No idea why it started there; out of widespread view, perhaps?

IIRC, not the first time Business Air/bmi regional has been involved in an incident and not the first time involving landings.

Can anyone locate a report of a Business Air (now bmi Regional) Saab landing so heavily it allegedly tore the wheels off? Supposedly at East Midlands Airport, some time ago, IIRC.

Reminds me, if I'm correct, of a bmi Airbus some time ago that landed at Leeds with the parking brake applied. Nobody hurt was the main thing. Must've stopped pretty sharpish; burst main tryres; closed the airport. Wasn't the "reason" along the lines of the pilot responsible being so nervous of landing at Leeds he made the mistake of setting the park brake to on before landing?

In my humble opinion, it's "interesting" to see the bmi name continuing as it so tragically left off.

...arguably in more respects than one.

Cough
3rd Feb 2019, 09:36
Previous thread here (https://www.pprune.org/rumours-news/617225-bristol-runway-closure-report-issued-22-12-2017-a.html?highlight=emb-145+bristol) with a link to the AAIB report.

DaveReidUK
3rd Feb 2019, 10:05
Can anyone locate a report of a Business Air (now bmi Regional) Saab landing so heavily it allegedly tore the wheels off? Supposedly at East Midlands Airport, some time ago, IIRC.

Report here (https://www.gov.uk/aaib-reports/saab-scania-sf340a-g-gntf-13-february-1999). The similarities with the Bristol accident aren't immediately obvious.

Doug E Style
3rd Feb 2019, 10:34
Reminds me, if I'm correct, of a bmi Airbus some time ago that landed at Leeds with the parking brake applied. Nobody hurt was the main thing. Must've stopped pretty sharpish; burst main tryres; closed the airport. Wasn't the "reason" along the lines of the pilot responsible being so nervous of landing at Leeds he made the mistake of setting the park brake to on before landing?


No, that wasnít the reason.

DaveReidUK
3rd Feb 2019, 11:33
No, that wasn’t the reason.

Maybe not.

Though the AAIB seemed to think it was:

In the later stages of the approach, the commander inadvertently set the parking brake, instead of the flaps to FULL. He was probably focused on changing weather conditions, because of a previous difficult landing at LBA as well as the numerous wind advisory calls from ATC, the last of which was coincident with the co-pilot's initial request for full flap.

B2N2
3rd Feb 2019, 17:46
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/272x185/image_7abcdd356b2319f27a43f2aa6eefe9bb98adffe6.jpeg

What a prime example of jackass engineering.
Even with a different shape/color/orientation thatís just asking for trouble.

Carbon Bootprint
3rd Feb 2019, 18:37
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/272x185/image_7abcdd356b2319f27a43f2aa6eefe9bb98adffe6.jpeg

What a prime example of jackass engineering.
Even with a different shape/color/orientation thatís just asking for trouble.
I could rant on about "human factors" but that's so broad it defies definition in many circles. But at the top of the list is the Human/Machine Interface (HMI). Until that is intelligently addressed and reasonably standardized it will be a tough one to get past. MHO anyway.

fox niner
3rd Feb 2019, 19:43
Another example of bad, bad design was the 737 door lock access/deny knob and the rudder trim. Caused some serious trouble in Japan I believe.
when manufacturers design a new cockpit, they better ask the actual users about their views concerning the cockpit set-up.

12A
3rd Feb 2019, 19:54
The related AAIB bulletin states that there have been previous 'selection of wrong control' events, even when the controls have different locations, shapes and feel.

c52
3rd Feb 2019, 21:38
British Midland lost aircraft (source: Aviation-Safety.net)

Argonaut at Manchester when the wrong engine was turned off
737 at EMA when the wrong engine was turned off
F27 at EMA with a simulated engine failure
Viscount at Manchester with a simulated engine failure
Viscount at LHR with engine failure

The first four look like self-inflicted events of remarkable similarity.

kiwi grey
3rd Feb 2019, 22:15
when manufacturers design a new cockpit, they better ask the actual users about their views concerning the cockpit set-up.

Ask actual users?
What are you smoking, fox?

They have experts in Human Machine Interface design, with PhDs and MBAs and stuff.
Why on earth would you want to ask an unqualified observer like an aeroplane driver with only a miserable undergraduate qualification?

:(

Callsign Kilo
3rd Feb 2019, 22:32
Another example of bad, bad design was the 737 door lock access/deny knob and the rudder trim. Caused some serious trouble in Japan I believe.
when manufacturers design a new cockpit, they better ask the actual users about their views concerning the cockpit set-up.


Tbh it isnít a bad design. Location of said items arenít ideal however the incident in Japan was both unique and, well, silly. The rudder trim is a completely different size and shape to the door access and deny switch. It shouldnít be one of those things that you misuse in the Ďheat of the moment.í I really canít account for what was going on there and I have almost 8K hours on the 737

16024
4th Feb 2019, 17:25
Just to pick up on something in the original post.
Maybe slightly off topic (maybe not).
Why shouldn't a training captain be under training?
They don't come out of the box fully formed.

NoelEvans
5th Feb 2019, 13:01
It appears that acbus1 has had some of his bus logic trip off line. Where is the logic in his argument?