PDA

View Full Version : Windshield damage and Airline procedures


Dwight Goodman
18th Mar 2010, 02:05
Your outer shield is cracked by a bird...Would you continue as planned?

Flight Detent
18th Mar 2010, 03:05
For our B737-700 IGW airplanes....

With either window 1, 2 or 3 outer panes cracked or shattered -

Continue normal operation.

But I wouldn't recommend operating the windshield wipers on that side for the main windows!

Cheers...FD...:)

Ooops, sorry....just read 'probationer',

Windows #1 and #2 are the main front windshields for each of the pilots.

Windows #3 are the big (both) sides (flight deck) windows.

cheers...

411A
18th Mar 2010, 03:08
Your outer shield is cracked by a bird...Would you continue as planned?

Normally yes.
Type L1011.
However, if visibily is degraded to a significant extent, then normally the window is replaced at the next station.

411A
18th Mar 2010, 07:41
However - As pilots, how certain can you be that it is just the outer pane etc.

Depends on the type...L1011, it makes no difference.
No restrictions...pressurisation, speed, etc.
None.

bcgallacher
18th Mar 2010, 12:26
The outer glass is basically only to run windshield wipers and to give a scratchproof surface - it depends on manufacturer but can be as little as 1/8 of an inch thick. On 747 the prucedure is to remove the cracked outer glass before departure.

rudderrudderrat
18th Mar 2010, 12:35
As pilots, how certain can you be that it is just the outer pane etc.

Close one eye whilst looking at the crack and place a pencil tip over it. Move your head a bit and the parallax will reveal how far away away the crack is.

Simples!

ggofpac
18th Mar 2010, 15:53
Depends on type i guess. Some aircraft might have a level + pressure differential limit. If level restricted- fuel consideration.
The next consideration would be the sector- if u departing from base they might want u to go back and not AOG it out of base.

Bolty McBolt
18th Mar 2010, 20:55
The outer glass is basically only to run windshield wipers and to give a scratchproof surface - it depends on manufacturer but can be as little as 1/8 of an inch thick.
On 747 the procedure is to remove the cracked outer glass before departure.

747 #1 window, the procedure you refer to is for only 1 brand of window fitted to the 747 ("Triple X" I think). From memory to define the serviceability of the window required for dispatch revolved around visual impairment caused by the damage and structural security, whether arcing could be seen inside the window and the window heat was functional.
If any or all of these defects presented after a bird strike in flight, what would be the action?
Continue/return to an airport where these defects would cause the least issues? e.g avoid ice/rain conditions if avail.
Or fly on as 1 windscreen is serviceable ?

oceancrosser
18th Mar 2010, 23:29
Hmmm let's see. As far as I can recall I have had 4-5 outer pane failures in 3 different types of aircraft. None precluded me from continuing the flight to destination, however on 2 occasions I was leaving home base, and Maintenance wanted me back exactly for the reason that they had a window, whereas availability at outstation was either questionable or definitely non-existent. On the other occasions landed at destination and gave the airplane to Maintenance.
Non-events, except for a slightly extended layover at an outstation a couple of times.

UAL320Capt
19th Mar 2010, 03:20
The outer pane on my aircraft (757/767) is not structural.
Cracking of any or all glass plies or delamination between any plies does
not affect the pressurization capability of the window.
In the absence of an air leak or window deformation, no airplane or cabin altitude change is necessary.
A window is deformed if it bulges or bows significantly.

Checkboard
19th Mar 2010, 10:12
I've had a couple of the windows fail in flight on the 73. The QRH procedure has changed a few times over the past couple of years, generally becoming more conservative. Both of these failures (as are most) were due to arcing of the window heat. If the window failed due to a physical strike, then the integrity of the rest of the window must be called to question.

If the strike occurred in the climb, I would return. In the descent, I would land at destination. A bird strike is pretty unlikely in the cruise!