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hard_landing
23rd Feb 2008, 13:48
Hi all,

an AA flight has been diverted to MAN on full emergency.
Heard it was a hydrolic problem....not too many details....aircraft is on the runway surrounded by fire crews...pax being offloaded on runway.

Airport is closed for "1 hour" as of 1435

RingwaySam
23rd Feb 2008, 13:57
Heard they have a hydraulic problem, burst some tires on touchdown and the fire service sprayed foam around them. Not sure if that's true or not but everything has left the hold and is diverting.

S78
23rd Feb 2008, 14:40
MAN is closed until 17:00


S78

barrythecat
23rd Feb 2008, 15:30
Runway reopening now:ok:

timpara
23rd Feb 2008, 15:30
MY sister in law was on flight, PAX told to adopt brace positions.

not-another1
23rd Feb 2008, 15:56
Anyone know about manchester airport been closed due to plane stuck on runway?

mechelec
23rd Feb 2008, 16:02
Hi, thread already running on this event, AA diversion on emergency.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
23rd Feb 2008, 16:06
AA B767 outbound to Chicago suffered a hydraulic problem and returned to MAN. I was on Concorde's flight deck (conducting tours) and had a grandstand view of the landing - fast and shallow, and lots of smoke on touchdown (rumour is 2 tyres blew on landing).

It stopped on the runway (23R) with overheated brakes and was there for a long time, surrounded by fire and other services. Pax taken off eventually, then aircraft towed clear about 16:20, part flap still extended.

23L is closed for maintenance, so the 767 blocking 23R meant the airport was closed for most of the afternoon.

SSD

Beavis and Butthead
23rd Feb 2008, 16:21
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/manchester/7260747.stm


The Chicago-bound American Airlines flight turned back to the airport after engineers spotted a problem with its hydraulics shortly after take-off.


Really??????? :ugh:

old,not bold
23rd Feb 2008, 16:37
Why not?

Don't airlines have real-time data links to base engineering these days? Or perhaps AA carries an F/E?

I don't know. But it seems perfectly possible to me that engineers spotted the fault.

Even though it was probably the pilots.

dontdoit
23rd Feb 2008, 18:11
Shaggy Sheep Driver - Irrespective of the malfunction, we don't do "fast and shallow". Fast it might have seemed, but we don't ever (and I mean never, ever) duck under the glidepath to enhance the landing performance in any way. Trust me, I've seen a heavy weight flapless landing done for real in a Jumbo, and it works exactly like it does in the sim, 3 degrees, 2 reds/2 whites the whole way down!

spannersatcx
23rd Feb 2008, 18:11
it had already returned to stand after initial taxi out, got fixed, departed and came back again, guess it wasn't fixed then.:eek:

Shaggy Sheep Driver
23rd Feb 2008, 18:49
Shaggy Sheep Driver - Irrespective of the malfunction, we don't do "fast and shallow". Fast it might have seemed, but we don't ever (and I mean never, ever) duck under the glidepath to enhance the landing performance in any way. Trust me, I've seen a heavy weight flapless landing done for real in a Jumbo, and it works exactly like it does in the sim, 3 degrees, 2 reds/2 whites the whole way down!

I never suggested any glidesope ducking - That would be highly unprofessional (and uneccessary and dangerous etc etc) and certainly not implied by me re this landing, which I'm sure was carried out with consumate professionalism.

The 'shallow' comes in the flare..... atouchdown (following a standard if slightly fast approach) at a less nose-high attitude than usual, resulting in a faster and 'less held off' landing. I presume (don't know) that this is because the hydraulics failure meant less flap was available, the stall speed higher than normal, meaning a faster less held-off touchdown had to be performed.

That's what I said was 'shallow'... the landing, not the approach.

SSD

Mr @ Spotty M
23rd Feb 2008, 18:53
Well the BBC reported it better than Independent Television News Limited 2008.
It is headlined on Virgin Media as American Airlines plane crash lands at Manchester, where do these idiots come from.:mad:

Monarch Man
23rd Feb 2008, 18:55
Looks like a Flap 20 landing from the picture, depending apon the landing weight it could've resulted in a speed over the fence in the region of 180kts or so.
Probably unlucky to have burst a couple of tyres me thinks.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
23rd Feb 2008, 19:18
As it was towed past us following the incident, I noted the flaps were still at an intermediate setting - a lot less than full extension and not showing much deflection either, so flaps 20 does seem likely.

SSD

rottenlungs
23rd Feb 2008, 19:59
Is flap 20 a typical take-off setting? Perhaps they started to misbehave when starting to cleanup. My idea of flying a large aircraft is when I take up the club`s C172 (!). Would a typical response to a split flap condition in one of the big ones be to leave them where they were?

fisbangwollop
23rd Feb 2008, 20:38
A few years back doing an ATC flight deck trip out of KSFO on an AA B767, shortly after departure we had an AICAS warning "LE STAB ASYM".....leading edge stabaliser assymetric!!! After much head scratching and talking to eng on the radio it was assumed to be a micro switch fault but the books said we had to return using minimum flap, this required an approach speed of 180kts....flight also heavy as 767 has no fuel dumping facility......I asked the capt. why no dumping facility, his comment was " The guy that designed this aircraft had his head up his arse at the time!!!" Anyway Mr Boeing reckons the aircraft can land no problem with max all up weight. On final approach the captain turned to me sitting in the jump seat and said the worse thing that will happen is we run off the end of the runway!!!!.....needless to say all went well and I am still here today to tell the story............I wonder if today was the same type of fault????

Floppy Link
23rd Feb 2008, 20:59
...are you sure it was a 767 'cos all the ones I've flown have had fuel jettison capability.
Or maybe I haven't flown the right ones :)

grebllaw123d
23rd Feb 2008, 21:06
I flew the B-767-300ER for many years.
My company had 15 aircraft, and some of them had fuel jettison, some did not!

fisbangwollop
23rd Feb 2008, 21:22
Some earlier models were retro fitted with dumping aids.....I guess newer models come fitted.

737 appears not to be fitted........GSM this afternoon held at EGPH for over an hour before returning to land with severe vibrations........had fuel aboard for GCTS.

high-flyer
24th Feb 2008, 05:54
Hi all,

I was flying one of the flights that left 23R immediately before the AA aircraft returned to MAN. He had a centre hydraulic system failure, had to gravity extend the gear and said the approach speed would be higher than usual.

Glad to hear everyone was ok.

We got away just in time, home in time to see the rugby!


high-flyer

Swedish Steve
24th Feb 2008, 07:48
fidbangwallop

shortly after departure we had an AICAS warning "LE STAB ASYM".....leading edge stabaliser assymetric!!!

I think you mean LE SLAT ASSY.

If you have STAB assy you are in trouble. The Left and RIght stabilisers are bolted together!

SOPS
24th Feb 2008, 08:03
I was scratching my head as to what a LE STAB was !!!!!!!:cool:

pogop
24th Feb 2008, 09:38
The 767-200 does not have a fuel jettison system, the -300 does and I assume the -400 does as well.
No such message as "LE STAB ASSYM" as far as I'm aware, possibly "LE SLAT ASSYM".
Looking at the photo, the main gear doors appear to be open, implying manual gear extension. This, coupled with a possible flap 20 landing, would imply a loss of the centre hydraulic system.

Nepotisim
24th Feb 2008, 10:18
As has been said by grebllaw123d some 767-300's have fuel jettison capability and some don't.

fisbangwollop
24th Feb 2008, 12:02
Just testing guys....your dead right it was Leading edge Slat warning!! Anyway it was a good few years back and it certainally caused some head scratching by the crew as no one had ever seen it before!!!

AircraftOperations
24th Feb 2008, 18:04
You can see from the photo, if you look carefully, that the MLG doors are hanging down.

JanetFlight
2nd Mar 2008, 18:33
In this Forum Link there are some cool pics

http://forum.keypublishing.co.uk/showthread.php?p=1221162

Cheers:)

None
2nd Mar 2008, 19:28
Only ERs have fuel jettison. You can spot the jettison spighots inside the outboard ailerons on each wing.

NSEU
2nd Mar 2008, 20:32
As has been said by grebllaw123d some 767-300's have fuel jettison capability and some don't.

Correct. And not all -300ER's have them (in case someone misinterprets the previous poster's message as "all ER's having fuel jettison").

But we digress.... :}