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Ethiopean infos.

African Aviation Regional issues that affect the numerous pilots who work in this area of the world.

Ethiopean infos.

Old 15th Dec 2015, 12:25
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: On a Wing!
Posts: 204
Like wise stockman. Many thanks for the info in advance.
Any Intel on the screening would be valuable.
Any specials?
Thanks again
King on a Wing is offline  
Old 17th Dec 2015, 02:34
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 7
Hello

Overtime starts after 80 hrs in calendar month

Overtime rate Basic pay
------------- = $ per hour. E.g. 7500/80= 93.75 per hour
80

If your rotation starts on 1 st of the month then in 25 calendar months you can fly 120 hrs and get 40 hrs over time. Legally not possible every month do the math.

You can get overtime every month if you want to fly like crazy. Ethiopian airlines does not mind ( they will love you ) and the CAA looks the other way.

Assessment

I don't know of anyone that has failed the assessment in the sim.( that doesn't mean that people don't )
Pretty straight forward profile. High altitude 7650 ft for addis. So be a little careful for performance and TO &LDG. Ext flaps etc.

Interview

Straight forward questions
Last question. Can you start today.....lol

Lastly
The retention rate in Ethiopian airlines is very poor. Majority expats leave before a year.
Few make it to 2 years
A select meager few past that
STOCKMAN is offline  
Old 17th Dec 2015, 02:48
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 7
I forgot to add

Medical.
It's high altitude in addis. So it could be a little difficult on the treadmill and blood work ( they do give you plenty of slack for it. So no real worries there).

A few of the pilots were hired with just the medical and interview. No Sim

So assessment would be the last of anyone's worries.
STOCKMAN is offline  
Old 17th Dec 2015, 04:56
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Africa
Posts: 412
Overtime starts after 80 hrs in calendar month

Overtime rate Basic pay
------------- = $ per hour. E.g. 7500/80= 93.75 per hour
80

If your rotation starts on 1 st of the month then in 25 calendar months you can fly 120 hrs and get 40 hrs over time. Legally not possible every month do the math.

You can get overtime every month if you want to fly like crazy. Ethiopian airlines does not mind ( they will love you ) and the CAA looks the other way.

And right there is the reason for the slow motion taxiing and interminable wait lining up while everyone at the holding point wishes they'd get a bloody move on.
Cardinal Puff is offline  
Old 18th Dec 2015, 07:19
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Qatar
Posts: 5
Hi Stockman

Thanks for the feedback.. Going to ADD on 21st for the interview. Will let you know how it goes...
Didn't quite get the Math on the overtime.. May be you explain that over a beer in ADD... is it possible to walk away with 15k in a month,.!! Do you prefer the 25/12 over 20/10 rotation!!..

Thanks again..
SEEDA is offline  
Old 7th Jan 2016, 18:24
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Ethiopia for 20 & Orlando for 10
Posts: 116
Emails

Sorry guys if I did not respond but I did not get any email. Please email me again if you have question. I do not check PPRuNe as much as I did when I was in the sandpit but I will check it once in a while.
Taylor01 is offline  
Old 20th Jan 2016, 19:54
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Earth
Posts: 123
Do they still recruit expats for the Q400?
JTrain is offline  
Old 10th Feb 2016, 18:17
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: 20 ADD 10 CPT
Posts: 157
Expat B737

Hi All,

I have been at ET on the B737 for about 8 month now and can give you some feedback, hope it is of some use.

Keep in mind Im an Ex FR Driver !

Interview

The interview process takes 2 days, day one is the medical, nothing special here, besides a blood test for AIDS and other tropical diseases.
Day 2 is the simulator and the interview.
Simulator is a mini LPC, hand flown SID with flight directors. Followed by steep turns and stalls.
Then a procedural ILS with landing, also with FD.
V1 cut with an ILS approach and go around, all with FD, he ended the session half way through the GA.
The interview was OK, asked lost of ATPL stuff, what is balanced field length, how is it calculated, what is1st, 2nd and 3rd segment climb. How do you do a take off calculation without OPT or performance tables. The answers is use the FPPM (Flight planning and performance manual), never heard of it, but its a Boeing manual with all the relevant graphs etc.

They provide business class tickets, accommodation, all meals and transport. The hotel is OK, kind of like a Hilton that is in need of an upgrade. Same hotel is provided free of charge during the training, but only breakfast, no lunch and dinner.

Training

Ground School:
Before you start the training they send you a link for the CBT, this is pretty much all the theory for a type rating plus ETOPS, RVSM etc.They want you to finish it before your arrival to ADD. Needless to say I did not do it, as I was goofing off at home and did not fancy doing a CBT when I could be drinking beer in front of a BBQ or goofing off at the beach.
Upon arrival in ADD they asked why I had not done it and I said I had no time, they were not too bothered. I did the CBT at the hotel, took about 4 days solid.
After this you get your uniform and all your ID’s then you do 2 observation flights (sit in jump seat and observe operation) First day was an ETOPS flight to Libreville and next day a 4 sector day, Mombassa, Kilimanjaro, Mombassa and back to Addis.

Sim:
This is followed by the SIM, 2 days fixed base and 5 days FFS followed by check. The sim is not too bad, the sessions are only 2 hours long and it is mostly to teach you about the emergency turns and depressurisation escape routes around the ADD area, lots of high terrain. ADD is 7500ft.
The check was OK, no surprises, except he asked me to do a SE visual. Otherwise standard stuff, depressurisation with escape route, due terrain around ADD, NPA with circle to land. V1 cut, visual circuit to land.

Line Training:
I had 7 days of line training with 3 different instructors. The instructors are pretty nice, but 2 of them were quite anal on the verge of being annoying, no yelling, just each guy had his own idea of what the SOP was, which is all different from what the SOP manual says. I was warned of the above before the training began and advised just to nod and agree otherwise they could get otherwise, they have quite a high opinion of themselves.
The check was over 2 days to Maputo (Overnight in Maputo), so pretty relaxed, he passed me half way through the second day, and asked if he could do the approach and landing, to show me how its done !

On Line

They are very short of captains, especially on the B737 fleet, so Ive been flying my ass off since I was released. FTLs are not adhered to, so you must decide yourself if you are up to it and if you are comfortable busting the FTL limits. The limits are 1000 hours a year, 110 hours in 30 days and 32 hours in 7 days. Some guys are doing 140 hours in 20 days, as after 80 hours you get 87.50 USD per block hour extra. The advice that most give is fly until you are not happy with your fatigue levels, then turn you phone off.

The aircraft are all pretty new, they have 5 -700 and 15 -800, with another 10 MAX’s coming starting 2017. They are all very well equipped 27K engines, sun blinds, galley camera automatic WX radar and 180min ETOPS, and some extra stuff on the Vnav side.

The flying is varied and pretty relaxed, not much traffic, interesting destinations and ETOPS sectors over the Congo and the Indian ocean when we do New Delhi.
The crappy sectors are to the middle east, which are all done during the night, so pretty exhausting. Some destinations don't even have approach plates, in Somaliland etc.

The fuel policy is pretty relaxed, no need to give a reason of why, on the day, you took extra, must just remember why you did it, as they can ask you to give a reason if asked later. During the rainy season the company wants you to carry at least a half hour coming into ADD, even if nothing on the TAF. So I regularly land with 4.5-5 ton, with a diversion requirement of 3.5.

The engineering is generally good, all the -800 are pretty new with new ones arriving at about 1 a months. The -700 are leased and have some MEL items, but nothing major. You always have access to an engineer, if the destination does not have an ET engineer stationed, you take one with you, he does the fueling, tech log and opens MEL items and performs maintenance actions. All the aircraft carry a Boeing „fly away kit“ which includes a main wheel, nose wheel and a big box of assorted spares and tools, so the most common tech problems can be dealt with on the spot. But do check the tech log as they do sometimes get creative when they do not have time or spares to do the job !

The first officers are all very nice, you are the king, sitting in the left seat, so none of this crappy rich kid attitude that was sometimes present in FR. Some are very inexperienced and not the best handling pilots and lack SA at times. I was jolted awake after a night sector from Kuwait with a 2.2G landing thanks to 300 hour space cadet.

Addis is a pretty dismal place, lots of poverty but the people are very friendly and it is very safe, no problems walking around town, even after dark. Beer and food is cheap too, about 0.50 euro for a beer and 5 for a meal.

The cabin crew cant do enough for you, great crew food and all positioning, commuting and staff travel in business class. And all the water and coffee you can drink !

Overall Im glad I have made the move, after leaving FR you come to realise just what a bunch of greedy gits FR management really are.

The roster is 10 days off 20 days on, plus 14 days annual leave.
The pay is 7000 USD basic (just had a 500 USD pay increase as of Jan 1st), 1200 per diems and 1250 housing allowance. 4200 USD every 6 month and 7000 USD after 3 years for contract completion. Plus 87.50 USD for overtime, as mentioned above. All amounts are NET (ie after tax).
You are paid the basic pay plus 60USD per diem during training. But the basic is paid in arrears over 6 months once training is finished, a bit of a pain, don't really know why they do this.

I live in a large house with 7 other expat pilots, good company. We pay approx 500 USD each for rent, 2 cleaners and a full time guard and driver and a permanently stocked beer fridge. So I take home about 700 USD every month in cash of unspent housing allowance.

If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

all the best

Goose

PS
JTrain
Had a few beers with an expat Q400 skipper who was going to work in Malawi for ET. They own 50% of Air Malawi.
Sky Goose is offline  
Old 11th Feb 2016, 00:30
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,484
Any examples of the "good" 777 routes flown by locals vs the routes flown by expat 777 pilots?
Iver is offline  
Old 12th Feb 2016, 19:58
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: planet earth
Posts: 38
Well, this is not really true anymore and all destinations are given to everybody. Of course you'll get US flights only if you have US visa.
Some "cleaning" has been done on the scheduling department and now it seems things are working differently.
777 pax is flying on a regular basis to China (pek, can,pvg) , Washington, lagos, Dubai, Johannesburg and Luanda. But very often they are used on Europe and other african destinations when pax booking is high,
777 F is flying regurally to Liege, maastricht Dubai, Hong kong, Mumbay, Dehli and Chennay plus a lot of occasional destinations in Europe, Asia and africa. Other Freighters are coming so probably other destination will be added soon.
Trimaranus is offline  
Old 12th Feb 2016, 20:47
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Europe
Posts: 82
Sky Goose and other ET pilots, thank you very much for your posts.

I hope to be joining you soon...but on the 767 as Capt. Can any of you come up with a little info about that? Still 7000 net? Lots of overtime on the 767 as well? Where do you pay taxes ? 767 Routes ?

Rgds
MD80767 Driver is offline  
Old 13th Feb 2016, 08:03
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: planet earth
Posts: 38
the salary is still 7000 + 1200 + 1250 (housing allowance) but now they pay an extra of 700 usd/month but paid every 6 months, so 4200 usd x 2 every year.
767 is in the process of being phase out in the coming years replaced by 787 but probably a few will remain including a couple of converted freighter.
So overtime is not frequent anymore. Routes are mainly african plus some asian like BKK DEL BOM an a few others
Regarding taxes, in ethiopia salary is tax free so it depends where you are resident and the rules of your country and if your country has any double taxation avoidance agreement with ethiopia.
Trimaranus is offline  
Old 13th Feb 2016, 09:12
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Qatar
Posts: 5
Thank you all for the great feedback. I am joining March 1st on the 777, I am all excited. What do you guys recommend for accommodation once training is done.?
Thanks again
SEEDA is offline  
Old 13th Feb 2016, 11:06
  #34 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Europe
Posts: 82
Trimaranus,

Thank you very much Sir. Im aware the 767 is leaving soon. Fine with me - I won't complain about being moved to the 77/78

Surprised to see that the salary is tax-free though. I checked wiki and it said that taxes are around 35% down there at those salary levels. But I won't complain about your info either
MD80767 Driver is offline  
Old 13th Feb 2016, 15:12
  #35 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: planet earth
Posts: 38
Accomodation after trainig, it depends, some of us prefer to remain in hotels some rented a house in both cases you can find many solutions at different prices. Once you are there you ll find easy to get all infos you need.
For the salary, true, ethiopian salaries above 5000 bir are taxed 35%,but expat salaries are tax free
Trimaranus is offline  
Old 14th Feb 2016, 11:29
  #36 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Europe
Posts: 82
Awesome. Thank you Sir
MD80767 Driver is offline  
Old 14th Feb 2016, 16:00
  #37 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Kopavogur
Posts: 144
As an expat, do you have access to ID tickets with *Alliance members like LH, OS, LX to facilitate commuting home? ( if home is not a ET destination)

Do family members get ID tickets?

How long is line training?

Thanks!
Icelanta is offline  
Old 14th Feb 2016, 16:19
  #38 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: planet earth
Posts: 38
You and Your family is entitled of 2 businnes class and 6 economy tkt a year plus 1 more every year of service. In addition, unlimited zed ticket with other airlines. Commuting to an Eth destination does not require tickets anyway as you have a reserved return C seat every month.
Line training normally does not last long, depends on you. There are a few destinations that you have to fly to be qualified but apart from those it's a normal line training.
Be aware that you are not paid during training but you will have all your money back after line ck is succesfully completed
Trimaranus is offline  
Old 6th Mar 2016, 08:06
  #39 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: AUH
Posts: 30
Any Q400 drivers on here with any info for us humble prop driver types? I see they are advertising for Q400 Capt.

Any info appreciated, I guess T and C's similar to what the 777 guys are saying except less pay cause its "only a wee turboprop..."
fortybelow is offline  
Old 25th Mar 2016, 23:46
  #40 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Trinidad
Posts: 3
B737

Goose thank you for this valuable info. If you have any bank of questions that they ask in the interview besides what you listed I would appreciate that greatly


I have been at ET on the B737 for about 8 month now and can give you some feedback, hope it is of some use.

Keep in mind Im an Ex FR Driver !

Interview

The interview process takes 2 days, day one is the medical, nothing special here, besides a blood test for AIDS and other tropical diseases.
Day 2 is the simulator and the interview.
Simulator is a mini LPC, hand flown SID with flight directors. Followed by steep turns and stalls.
Then a procedural ILS with landing, also with FD.
V1 cut with an ILS approach and go around, all with FD, he ended the session half way through the GA.
The interview was OK, asked lost of ATPL stuff, what is balanced field length, how is it calculated, what is1st, 2nd and 3rd segment climb. How do you do a take off calculation without OPT or performance tables. The answers is use the FPPM (Flight planning and performance manual), never heard of it, but its a Boeing manual with all the relevant graphs etc.

They provide business class tickets, accommodation, all meals and transport. The hotel is OK, kind of like a Hilton that is in need of an upgrade. Same hotel is provided free of charge during the training, but only breakfast, no lunch and dinner.

Training

Ground School:
Before you start the training they send you a link for the CBT, this is pretty much all the theory for a type rating plus ETOPS, RVSM etc.They want you to finish it before your arrival to ADD. Needless to say I did not do it, as I was goofing off at home and did not fancy doing a CBT when I could be drinking beer in front of a BBQ or goofing off at the beach.
Upon arrival in ADD they asked why I had not done it and I said I had no time, they were not too bothered. I did the CBT at the hotel, took about 4 days solid.
After this you get your uniform and all your ID’s then you do 2 observation flights (sit in jump seat and observe operation) First day was an ETOPS flight to Libreville and next day a 4 sector day, Mombassa, Kilimanjaro, Mombassa and back to Addis.

Sim:
This is followed by the SIM, 2 days fixed base and 5 days FFS followed by check. The sim is not too bad, the sessions are only 2 hours long and it is mostly to teach you about the emergency turns and depressurisation escape routes around the ADD area, lots of high terrain. ADD is 7500ft.
The check was OK, no surprises, except he asked me to do a SE visual. Otherwise standard stuff, depressurisation with escape route, due terrain around ADD, NPA with circle to land. V1 cut, visual circuit to land.

Line Training:
I had 7 days of line training with 3 different instructors. The instructors are pretty nice, but 2 of them were quite anal on the verge of being annoying, no yelling, just each guy had his own idea of what the SOP was, which is all different from what the SOP manual says. I was warned of the above before the training began and advised just to nod and agree otherwise they could get otherwise, they have quite a high opinion of themselves.
The check was over 2 days to Maputo (Overnight in Maputo), so pretty relaxed, he passed me half way through the second day, and asked if he could do the approach and landing, to show me how its done !

On Line

They are very short of captains, especially on the B737 fleet, so Ive been flying my ass off since I was released. FTLs are not adhered to, so you must decide yourself if you are up to it and if you are comfortable busting the FTL limits. The limits are 1000 hours a year, 110 hours in 30 days and 32 hours in 7 days. Some guys are doing 140 hours in 20 days, as after 80 hours you get 87.50 USD per block hour extra. The advice that most give is fly until you are not happy with your fatigue levels, then turn you phone off.

The aircraft are all pretty new, they have 5 -700 and 15 -800, with another 10 MAX’s coming starting 2017. They are all very well equipped 27K engines, sun blinds, galley camera automatic WX radar and 180min ETOPS, and some extra stuff on the Vnav side.

The flying is varied and pretty relaxed, not much traffic, interesting destinations and ETOPS sectors over the Congo and the Indian ocean when we do New Delhi.
The crappy sectors are to the middle east, which are all done during the night, so pretty exhausting. Some destinations don't even have approach plates, in Somaliland etc.

The fuel policy is pretty relaxed, no need to give a reason of why, on the day, you took extra, must just remember why you did it, as they can ask you to give a reason if asked later. During the rainy season the company wants you to carry at least a half hour coming into ADD, even if nothing on the TAF. So I regularly land with 4.5-5 ton, with a diversion requirement of 3.5.

The engineering is generally good, all the -800 are pretty new with new ones arriving at about 1 a months. The -700 are leased and have some MEL items, but nothing major. You always have access to an engineer, if the destination does not have an ET engineer stationed, you take one with you, he does the fueling, tech log and opens MEL items and performs maintenance actions. All the aircraft carry a Boeing „fly away kit“ which includes a main wheel, nose wheel and a big box of assorted spares and tools, so the most common tech problems can be dealt with on the spot. But do check the tech log as they do sometimes get creative when they do not have time or spares to do the job !

The first officers are all very nice, you are the king, sitting in the left seat, so none of this crappy rich kid attitude that was sometimes present in FR. Some are very inexperienced and not the best handling pilots and lack SA at times. I was jolted awake after a night sector from Kuwait with a 2.2G landing thanks to 300 hour space cadet.

Addis is a pretty dismal place, lots of poverty but the people are very friendly and it is very safe, no problems walking around town, even after dark. Beer and food is cheap too, about 0.50 euro for a beer and 5 for a meal.

The cabin crew cant do enough for you, great crew food and all positioning, commuting and staff travel in business class. And all the water and coffee you can drink !

Overall Im glad I have made the move, after leaving FR you come to realise just what a bunch of greedy gits FR management really are.

The roster is 10 days off 20 days on, plus 14 days annual leave.
The pay is 7000 USD basic (just had a 500 USD pay increase as of Jan 1st), 1200 per diems and 1250 housing allowance. 4200 USD every 6 month and 7000 USD after 3 years for contract completion. Plus 87.50 USD for overtime, as mentioned above. All amounts are NET (ie after tax).
You are paid the basic pay plus 60USD per diem during training. But the basic is paid in arrears over 6 months once training is finished, a bit of a pain, don't really know why they do this.

I live in a large house with 7 other expat pilots, good company. We pay approx 500 USD each for rent, 2 cleaners and a full time guard and driver and a permanently stocked beer fridge. So I take home about 700 USD every month in cash of unspent housing allowance.

If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.



PS
JTrain
Had a few beers with an expat Q400 skipper who was going to work in Malawi for ET. They own 50% of Air Malawi.[/QUOTE]
Beanhead is offline  

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