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Maun, Botswana. The essential guide.

African Aviation Regional issues that affect the numerous pilots who work in this area of the world.

Maun, Botswana. The essential guide.

Old 22nd Jun 2015, 17:27
  #1021 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bots
Posts: 118
Exascot, I agree about Tandurei.

I was blown away last month when I had booked a table for a birthday party. We arrived to find they had put up balloons and they gave us complimentary popadoms for a starter.

That kind of service was not expected at all.

Of course, the 'pilot special' (any chicken or lamb curry with rice and naan for P60) makes it even easier to enjoy the place.
PilotInPink is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 04:22
  #1022 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Canada
Age: 33
Posts: 630
And after living, working, and helping in the hiring process in Maun, I'm pretty sure I know a thing or two about the place. You spent how long there?
I never met you, I am just going off of the replies from people that knew/knew of you.

I'm also wanting to know who agrees with you that being of an advanced age or having a few thousand hours is of a disadvantage?

Also, if you read the tone of CC posts throughout his entire PPRuNe history, I think you might find he's not entirely serious with his posts...

@Pip Its good to see a few more places that are finally catching up with the fact that if you offer the pilots a good deal, that you will make a good whack of money!
lilflyboy262...2 is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 05:10
  #1023 (permalink)  
Está servira para distraerle.
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: In a perambulator.
Posts: 2
In the matter of seeming to be over qualified for a job, it's the attitude of employer and employee that's important. Teddy Roosevelt said something about walking softly and carrying a big stick. A little genuine humility can be good for the soul as well as the reputation.
At airline interviews one can be faced with the situation where a very experienced middle aged captain on a turbo prop has been applying for a position as first officer on a jet. You need to be able to assess that this applicant will transition well from left hand seat back to right hand without trying to impose his ego into the CRM ethos or into the process of interpreting and implementing the company Operations Manual. Then you've got to ask yourself whether a thirty year old jet captain can fly with an ex forces fifty year old prop dog. It's actually for the older man to make the bigger effort. He's the newcomer. The quiet self effacing applicant usually appears to do well in the transition process. The guy who tells you at length how he flew fast jets, perhaps less so.

lilflyboy262...2 is quite correct, levity is an inherent part of aerodynamics, however perhaps this one post slipped through the censor as being reasonably sincere.
cavortingcheetah is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 05:42
  #1024 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Around
Posts: 109
And after living, working, and helping in the hiring process in Maun, I'm pretty sure I know a thing or two about the place.
Well we'll see how he gets on then.

I never met you, I am just going off of the replies from people that knew/knew of you.
So you're talking out your arse then, basing your opinion on what some internet person said on some internet board, sounds like some killer judgement right there.

James331 is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 06:20
  #1025 (permalink)  
Está servira para distraerle.
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: In a perambulator.
Posts: 2
Actually, Abraham Lincoln, who was not nearly as good a president as the liberal left would have you imagine, died on April15, 1865 having been shot at the theatre which, I suppose, was as close to the internet as they could get in 1865 or even in 1868.
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Old 23rd Jun 2015, 11:12
  #1026 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Botswana & Greece
Age: 63
Posts: 940
I was offered a job in Maun even given my senior years and hours. It was tongue in cheek. My conditions of only three mornings a week and only in nice weather was rejected

Back to service; at a certain camp just outside town, by a famous old bridge, we walk in and my savannah with ice and lemon is on the bar and my bacon sarnie order has already gone to the kitchen

Here in Greece it is self service for us. It is faster but then tourists think that you are a waiter
Exascot is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 13:14
  #1027 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tamworth, UK / Nairobi, Kenya
Posts: 613
Actually, Abraham Lincoln, who was not nearly as good a president as the liberal left would have you imagine, died on April15, 1865 having been shot at the theatre which, I suppose, was as close to the internet as they could get in 1865 or even in 1868.
And Lincoln was a Republican.
darkroomsource is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 14:52
  #1028 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Location, Location
Age: 31
Posts: 33
Hey Guys,

I need to do my recency of flight training before heading to Maun in October and to that end I've been looking at South African flight schools. I have been told by Loutzavia (Wonderboom) that I would be required to convert my FAA licence to the SACAA one prior to any flying.

Do you guys know if the operators in Bots look more favorably on an SACAA license? Would it make it easier for me to get that every elusive work permit?

Your thoughts?

Cheers,

K.O.

(our group to bots has now grown to 5, anyone else who'd like to join, drop me a PM. another avid aviator has set up a WhatsApp group for us that are heading down. its much easier than using PPRuNe all the time )
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Old 23rd Jun 2015, 15:10
  #1029 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Bots
Posts: 118
SA licence won't give you any advantage in my opinion.

If your current licence has class ratings, the South African licence would actually be a disadvantage.
PilotInPink is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 15:27
  #1030 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Location, Location
Age: 31
Posts: 33
Class rating?

All my license says is that I am certified to fly anything Single Engine Land, and Multi-Engine Land with Instrument privileged (as long as its not above 12,500lbs/5700kgs - type rating required).

I'm not familiar with a class rating. Is this a JAA/CAA/SACAA thing?
K.O. is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 16:11
  #1031 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Jan 2002
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I could be wrong of course, the margins for error are significant, but in the US:

The single and multi certification up to 12,500lbs is a class rating. A rotorcraft certification would also be a class rating.
For aircraft that weight over 12,500lbs or turbojets, a type rating is required, specifically as in Beech 350 or Boeing 747.
cavortingcheetah is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2015, 18:13
  #1032 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Location, Location
Age: 31
Posts: 33
Ok i got it sorted:

1.) Category: Broad classification of things that fly.

-Airplane, Rotocraft, Glider, and Lighter than air.

2.) Class: Single Engine Land, Multi-Engine Land, Single Engine Sea, Multi-Engine sea, Gyroplane, Helicopter, Airship and Free Balloon.

3.) Type: Refers to a specific make and model of things that fly, including modifications thereto that do not change its handling or flight characteristics, and similarly also for propulsion units.

-Cessna 172, DC-7, B737 - different types of aircraft that fall under the same CATEGORY of airplane; used in the certification of airmen

-DC7, DC7C, and other variants of the DC7 - similar in design, used for certification of aircraft

-JT8D, JT8D-7 are of the same type and then JT9D-3A, JT9D-7 are of the same type; used in the certification of aircraft engines.

So a C172 has a Class of Airplane, a Category of Single Engine Land, and Type of C172-NAVIII or C172SP (different types)

I believe im right, but any one who disagrees can feel free to correct me. After all, we're all still learning to be better aviators
K.O. is offline  
Old 24th Jun 2015, 11:29
  #1033 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tamworth, UK / Nairobi, Kenya
Posts: 613
Yes KO
But, I'm thinking you're from FAA land, and you're not familiar with having to have a type rating to fly a Cessna 172, and a different type rating to fly a Cessna 152, and a different type rating to fly a Cessna 182
darkroomsource is offline  
Old 24th Jun 2015, 14:54
  #1034 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Location, Location
Age: 31
Posts: 33
True. I am from FAA land.

Do "you guys" have a different definition for type rating? Or is that just a generic term that's used for any aircraft that you have demonstrated proficiency in? How many type ratings can you have on your license?
K.O. is offline  
Old 24th Jun 2015, 19:44
  #1035 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: UK
Age: 74
Posts: 1,052
Type ratings are fairly simple, there is no limit on how many you can have.
The time and cost involved varies with the amount of differences.
Basically you spend some time in the classroom studying differences and then spend some time in the air with an instructor who will then sign your logbook to say that you are competant on type. You can use it immediately but you need to take your logbook and licence into the CAA office to get it added to your licence at the first reasonable opportunity.

If you already fly a C172 it will be quick and easy to add a C182 for example because the only significant differences are the VP prop, weight and balance and a tad less tendency to float in ground effect. The next step from C182 to C206 is also simple.

Going from a C172 to a Baron is going to be a lot harder and more expensive, you will almost certainly have to convert to the Bonansa first.
The Ancient Geek is offline  
Old 26th Jun 2015, 20:42
  #1036 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Over there
Age: 35
Posts: 32
Good afternoon.

Has anyone ever come back to work in the Delta after leaving? Just curious what the process of landing a job would be, if it's the same process, or if preference was given if one has already flown out of Maun for a season. I didn't think I'd miss flying in Bots that much.


Cheers.
rmball is offline  
Old 27th Jun 2015, 03:24
  #1037 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Location, Location
Age: 31
Posts: 33
Have you flown in the delta before?
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Old 27th Jun 2015, 16:21
  #1038 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Over there
Age: 35
Posts: 32
Originally Posted by K.O. View Post
Have you flown in the delta before?
400 hours C206 in the Okavango. Now another 500 in the C208 in the states. Boring flying here.
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Old 28th Jun 2015, 09:46
  #1039 (permalink)  
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400 hours C206
How many until you could land it smoothly
Exascot is offline  
Old 29th Jun 2015, 17:06
  #1040 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cape Town RSA
Age: 54
Posts: 41
Originally Posted by Exascot View Post
How many until you could land it smoothly
Great question...I think firstly at 50 hours, then I lost it, then got it again at 200 hours, then I lost it again at 500 hours then got it back, dunno when, and then I think it stayed (but thats just my opinion)

How many ex Maun pilots have returned looking for real flying again?
zoneout is offline  

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