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Severe turbulence LHR-SIN. One dead.

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Severe turbulence LHR-SIN. One dead.

Old 21st May 2024, 12:51
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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ok,, we do not know what happened except that one pax is deceased.. seat belt or no seat belt,, warning or no warning,, we do not know,, no speculation let the authorities do their job...
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:04
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Originally Posted by mtogw
ok,, we do not know what happened except that one pax is deceased.. seat belt or no seat belt,, warning or no warning,, we do not know,, no speculation let the authorities do their job...
If this advice was heeded this board would cease to exist! [continuous seatbelt wearer, precautionary loo visit habituť]
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:13
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Originally Posted by MichaelOLearyGenius
I donít know the full details but itís time to make it a legal requirement to wear a seatbelt while seated on an aeroplane just like it is in cars.
could absolve the airline of liability if this was made law and pax was SEATED at the time.
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:16
  #44 (permalink)  
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From Sky News UK:
Kittipong Kittikachorn, general manager of Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, told reporters one male passenger had died of cardiac arrest.

He said about 30 people were injured, including at least one member of the crew.
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:16
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Update about the deceased, in the Grauniad.


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Old 21st May 2024, 13:22
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My thoughts go out to all involved. This is part of an video that is circulating that I have edited that removes two sections from what appears to be SIA321 showing some of the aircraft

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1V9j...gnW/view?pli=1
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:22
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Here we go again! Lots of idiotic comments from people who have either never flown or never flown long haul. Reserve all comments until such a time we have the facts about what exactly happened. I keep my seatbelt fastened at all times except when I need to go to the bathroom (and the signs are off). Therefore even I who respects the seat belt on when seated can become a statistic. Also, as already mentioned, cabin crew only strap up during cruise if specifically instructed to do so by the cockpit.
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:22
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Just how many videos have I witnessed over the last 10 years or so from PPL's to Senior BA Captains claiming "turbulence is uncomfortable, but never dangerous?"
I cringe when I see such.
Aircraft (although rare) have been ripped apart in turbulence. This story shows that you can never take anything for granted? You just do not know?
Pax... always keep your belt fastened, as tight as is comfortable.
Pilots... don't needlessly sit in turbulence, find smoother air.
I experienced nearly 4 decades in aviation and always found a way out of unpleasant conditions. Not always 100% for sure but I do remember being tossed around like crazy in a GV at FL450 so went down in increments to FL350 to find something acceptable. Pax were very very grateful, I had one less thing to worry about, FA could continue working and we all arrived safely. Operator picked up the extra fuel bill... so what?
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:22
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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​​​
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:23
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SQ321 is non-stop from London to Singapore – more than 12 hours. It's absurd to pretend that everyone could, or even should, stay in their seats for that length of time.
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:25
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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I am a little bit staggered but not surprised at the comments by some on here in climate change denial. Whilst in your short flying history you may not have noticed a big change, if you research over a few decades, you will see it. This is a report from the scientific experts, showing that Turbulence has increased including clear air turbulence.

Aviation turbulence soared by up to 55% as the world warmed Ė new research - Connecting Research (reading.ac.uk)


We find that severe clear-air turbulence has increased by 55% over the north Atlantic and 41% over the US since 1979. It does go up and down from one year to the next, but thereís a clear long-term upward trend, consistent with the expected effects of climate change. We find similar increases on other busy flight routes over Europe, the Middle East and the south Atlantic.

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Old 21st May 2024, 13:26
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by procede
Also my theory is that standing in the aisle, you are are much better able to brace yourself than sitting in a seat as you can grab on the the baggage rail. Also you will not be able to gain as much speed before you hit the ceiling.
Humans simply aren't strong enough to "brace yourself" against even -1G (imagine the plane being turned upside down). And at +2G you're being dumped onto the floor/seats whatever you do. Seatbelts are rated to around 1500kg: how much do you bench press?
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:32
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Sir Isaac Newton might prefer you to consider these events as the human body staying still and being hit by moving objects. In other words, the beneficial effect of the seatbelt is to transfer the forces already acting on the airframe to the human and thus avoid impacts on vulnerable heads and limbs.
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:53
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Video from inside on this page (scroll about 1/3).
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Old 21st May 2024, 13:55
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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That puts a different perspective on it. Condolences to his loved ones.

It is possible to be injured if you hit turbulence even if you are seated and belted. I remember a flight out of Schiphol in around 96/97 on a 1 month old Boeing 767/777? On the climb out we hit turbulence and one of the ceiling panels (must have been at least 2m long) fell down. It just missed me, but gave another passenger a real bang on the head. I spent the next 6 hours looking up at space blanket style insulation and wiring.
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Old 21st May 2024, 14:02
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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The inspections required for a 777 following a 'Severe Turbulence' encounter take a good few hours to complete. Where accessible, the main spar structure will be getting a very good 'looking at' for material distress. Judging by the amount of cabin overhead furniture that has come adrift, it is a fair bet this airframe has been overstressed beyond design limits and will be written off.
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Old 21st May 2024, 14:04
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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Video from inside cabin shows that however controlled descent attempts were, there was some severe vibration/shaking which caused the injuries and unfortunate fatality. Kudos to pilots and crew for handling a very difficult situation, which could have had an even worse outcome. Condolences to family of the British gentleman who passed away.
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Old 21st May 2024, 14:15
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by happyjack
Just how many videos have I witnessed over the last 10 years or so from PPL's to Senior BA Captains claiming "turbulence is uncomfortable, but never dangerous?"
I cringe when I see such.
Aircraft (although rare) have been ripped apart in turbulence. This story shows that you can never take anything for granted? You just do not know?
Pax... always keep your belt fastened, as tight as is comfortable.
Pilots... don't needlessly sit in turbulence, find smoother air.
I experienced nearly 4 decades in aviation and always found a way out of unpleasant conditions. Not always 100% for sure but I do remember being tossed around like crazy in a GV at FL450 so went down in increments to FL350 to find something acceptable. Pax were very very grateful, I had one less thing to worry about, FA could continue working and we all arrived safely. Operator picked up the extra fuel bill... so what?
Unfortunately commercial aeroplanes cannot just dive down to a more acceptable level and hope the fuel will be paid for. Very, very occasionally we have the luxury of a bit of extra fuel but not that often.

Professional airline pilots (of which I am one) donít necessarily sit in turbulence. I find that comment rather insulting.

Occasionally, we do get SIGMETS when there is a severe turbulence area on our route but often itís not as severe as we feared. If itís a few hundred miles wide there are no other options than to go through it.

There are occasions when a small thunderstorm cell pops up from nowhere and, despite having state of the art radar, itís often best to look out the window and go round them.

Different times nowadays. Most of us are flying around with flight plan fuel and if we do need to descend we sometimes canít because thereís other aircraft beneath us.

Small, private jets may have the luxury of being able to descend if theyíre at FL450 as thereís no one else up there but the heavy metal/plastic have no option other than to lumber on at the lower levels.

The Singapore guys and gals are a professional lot. I feel for the pilots as well as the deceased and the injured. I can only imagine how awful they (the pilots) must be feeling.

I havenít looked at these forums as much as I used to but it used to be professional pilots who posted but it seems on this thread itís mere speculation spectators.
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Old 21st May 2024, 14:26
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Magplug
The inspections required for a 777 following a 'Severe Turbulence' encounter take a good few hours to complete. Where accessible, the main spar structure will be getting a very good 'looking at' for material distress. Judging by the amount of cabin overhead furniture that has come adrift, it is a fair bet this airframe has been overstressed beyond design limits and will be written off.
Interested SLF rather than professional here......

I assume that the diversion into Bangkok was based on this event being a medical emergency rather than any danger to the aircraft itself. I have read nothing, nor seen any professionally informed comment to the effect that the structural integrity of the airframe is likely to have been compromised.

I stand to be corrected, but I have no recollection of any civil airliner having been written off due to flying through turbulence.
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Old 21st May 2024, 14:34
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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It doesn't help that so may Airlines around the world turn the seat belt sign at the slightest bump.
But, how many times can we tell People it's best to keep it fastened while seated. At some point it becomes simple Darwinism.
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