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Cessna Excel Down in Farmington CT

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Cessna Excel Down in Farmington CT

Old 2nd Sep 2021, 21:12
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Cessna Excel Down in Farmington CT

https http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/l...olice/2574190/

Google Robertson airport. The end of runway 02 is a stones throw to the corner of the Trumpf Inc building where the a/c came to rest.

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Old 4th Sep 2021, 16:33
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Though the immediate cause of this is cited as "mechanical failure", I know of no further details at this time. Below, please find further information about this sad accident from the Stamford Advocate:For Danbury pilot killed in Farmington crash, 'everything was about flying'
Julia Perkins
Sep. 3, 2021Updated: Sep. 3, 2021 7:05 p.m.
Comments 8 1of8Mark Morrow, left with his wife, Dunja Morrow, right. Pilot Mark Morrow, 57, of Danbury, was one of four people killed in a plane crash in Farmington on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021.
Contributed Photo / contributed
DANBURY — Mark Morrow could fix cars and motorcycles before he could drive.

With the money he earned over the years from that and his job at IBM, the Danbury man and his dad bought their first plane when he was in his 30s.

“It was his life’s dream to be a pilot,” said his son, Michael Morrow.

Mark Morrow, 57, was one of four people killed Thursday when the Cessna Citation 560X he and another pilot were flying out of Plainville crashed during takeoff in Farmington.
Mark Morrow, right, with his wife, Dunja Morrow, left. Pilot Mark Morrow, 57, of Danbury, was one of four people killed in a plane crash in Farmington on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021.
Contributed Photo/Morrow family / contributedCo-pilot William O’Leary, 55, of Bristol, and the two passengers Courtney Haviland, 33, and her husband, William Shrauner, 32, of Boston, also were killed.

“He talked about flying every minute of his life,” said Dunja Morrow, his wife of more than 30 years, said Friday afternoon, crying as she remembered. “Everything was about flying.”

Mark Morrow was a flight instructor for decades, teaching his daughter to fly and instructing his son a bit, too, Michael Morrow said.

“He was a very avid teacher and just loved to share his passion with flying for anybody and everybody he could,” Michael Morrow said.

He was a freelance pilot most recently, but worked for ConnAir Corp., a private jet charter company, before COVID-19, said Mark’s brother, Scott Morrow.

“He was really gifted, mechanically,” Scott Morrow said, his voice shaking as he struggled to hold back tears. “He was extremely gifted. He could fix anything. It didn’t matter what it was. He could take anything apart and put it back together.”

A one-time track athlete, Mark Morrow passed his “incredible speed” onto his kids, his brother said.

“He was such a gentle guy,” Scott Morrow said. “When I would try to fight him [as a kid], he would never take a swing at me. He would just wrestle me to the ground until I was exhausted.”

A ‘meticulous’ pilot

He was a “diligent,” “careful” and “meticulous” pilot and mechanic, his son said. He enjoyed working on cars or around the house, as well as reading about flying in his free time.

“Flying was his life,” son Michael Morrow said. “It was his love.”

He participated in professional development and was “up to par” with the latest rules and regulations from the Federal Aviation Administration, his wife said. Farmington police Lt. Tim McKenzie said Thursday the aircraft appeared to have suffered a “mechanical failure” during takeoff in the moments leading to the crash.

The plane was taking off from Robertson Airport in Plainville on Thursday morning, en route to Dare County Regional Airport in Manteo, N.C.

Before he left, Mark Morrow asked his wife if she was jealous.

“Jealous about what?” she recalled asking.

“That I’ll be swimming in the Outer Banks,” he replied.

The National Transportation Safety Board is leading the investigation.

The Cessna Citation 560X business jet crashed into a small field next to the Trumpf Inc. building, flipped upside down and hit the business, which caught on fire. The building was badly damaged, but all employees were accounted for, police said Thursday.

Scott Morrow is certain Mark was thinking of public safety as the plane went down.

“I bet his thought was do not touch that building,” said Scott Morrow, adding his brother likely focused on protecting the others on board. “He put everybody before himself.”

Family man

Mark Morrow, who was his son’s Michael’s Boy Scout leader, was an “extremely loving” husband and father, Michael Morrow said. Mark Morrow had two children and five siblings and took care of his mother, who lives nearby.

“He was the best guy I ever could have hoped for,” his wife said. “He was such a great, great person.”

He lived most of his life in Danbury, but lived in Spain and met his wife in Germany. They married in November 1989 on his parents’ property on King Street.

Mark Morrow is the son of the late Don Morrow, a Danbury voiceover actor for movies and commercials who announced the news with famed broadcasters like Walter Cronkite and Lowell Thomas.

Mark Morrow taught his dad to fly, and the two bought their first plane together, Scott Morrow said.

“That way my dad could fly a lot more and my brother could teach him,” Scott Morrow said.

He described his older brother as a “conscientious” person.

“He was just a good, kind person and gave more than he took,” he said.

His co-pilot

For O’Leary, the co-pilot, the runway at Robertson Airport was a lifelong hub. As a child, O’Leary spent much of his time around his father, William “Bill” O’Leary, and the family’s Interstate Aviation business which operated out of the airport, according to people who knew him. The younger O’Leary went by Will.

He later learned to fly and when his father sold the business several years ago, Will O’Leary continued to fly charter planes as a “line pilot” from the airport.

“He was very good at flying the jets in and out of Robertson,” Plainville Town Manager Robert E. Lee said in an email Friday. “His sisters worked in the office as well (still do). They were a family where Robertson Airport was a second home.”

A woman who answered the phone at Interstate Aviation on Friday afternoon declined to say whether O’Leary was flying for the company on Thursday, referring any additional questions to the FAA.

Robert Zirpolo, a former member of the town’s aviation commission as well as a former pilot for Interstate Aviation, said O’Leary was an “accomplished pilot” who followed his father’s footsteps and learned to fly as a teenager. According to FAA records, O’Leary was licensed as a flight instructor in addition to being a transport pilot.

O’Leary was a “mild-mannered guy,” who was well liked by the community of pilots around Plainville, Zirpolo said. “He wasn’t a guy who made a lot of noise.”

“Very big loss for Robertson Airport and Interstate, to say nothing of the loss for his family,” Lee added.
========================================================
My childhood home was on the other side of Talbot (Avon) Mountain from this flight's departure airfield. Later in life my wife and I lived a very relaxed life in Manteo on Roanoke Island. My wife learned to fly at the airfield there, which was the flight in question's destination. A very tragic accident. May all RIP and their families find consolation.

Last edited by cavuman1; 5th Sep 2021 at 23:27. Reason: Punctuation
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Old 5th Sep 2021, 02:05
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https://www.foxnews.com/us/connectic...-doctors-child
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Old 5th Sep 2021, 05:35
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Some initial, and somewhat disturbing details here


A very sad day for those involved and their loved ones.
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Old 5th Sep 2021, 11:13
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Points for polite and mature discussion for the greater education.

There was an accident at LBA some number of years ago where a Citation jet commenced the take off roll with the parking brake applied. The occurrence was similar to this incident except there were no fatalities.

The unmeasurable quantity here is what is normal acceleration? if you do not meet V1 on the take off role how do you know if you either have enough acceleration to continue on a short runway or have enough space to try and stop?

With most small or mid sized jets the V1 is calculated on a balanced field and possibly based on brake energy limits, not runway distance available. On a short runway with one speed V1/Vr which will be at the end of the TORA then the aircraft will never stop in the clearway if the stop is initiated late in the take off run.

Will this incident prompt a revision of take off calculation procedures for small or mid sized jets?
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Old 5th Sep 2021, 18:29
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With most small or mid sized jets the V1 is calculated on a balanced field and possibly based on brake energy limits, not runway distance available. On a short runway with one speed V1/Vr which will be at the end of the TORA then the aircraft will never stop in the clearway if the stop is initiated late in the take off run
As the aircraft is certified to FAR 25 I'd have thought all take offs would be planned to be able to stop with failure at the EF point and the first stopping action taken at V1 (25.109 Accelerate-stop distance), or be able to continue the take off with one engine out if the failure occurs at a point where the first stopping action would be post V1 (25.111 Takeoff path).
Will this incident prompt a revision of take off calculation procedures for small or mid sized jets?
Are small and mid size jets certificated to FAR 25 given some slack in application of these procedures?
The unmeasurable quantity here is what is normal acceleration
You have no way of knowing, some military aircraft have a system that under X conditions it will take Y seconds to accelerate to Z knots, another system was Z knots by a certain distance.
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Old 28th Sep 2021, 23:07
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This article confirms that the parking brake handle was found in the "set" position during the post crash investigation.

Parking brake set
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Old 28th Sep 2021, 23:48
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An incomprehensible tragedy. I am unfamiliar with the type, but expect that a Parking Brake Set would be anunciated; barring that, "parking brake off/released" must certainly be a pre-takeoff checklist item. I wonder if there were some sort of rush here. Such a regrettable loss of good lives....
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Old 29th Sep 2021, 05:04
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An incomprehensible tragedy
Not unkown.

https://aviation-safety.net/database...?id=20150925-1

Even the big boys, though the exact reason for brakes being on was undetermined.

http://libraryonline.erau.edu/online...s/AAR72-12.pdf
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Old 29th Sep 2021, 13:12
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On the XL/XLS(-) the parking brake is a black handle to the left of the captain's control column, below the panel. Depending on seat and control column position it may not be visible from the right seat unless you lean forwards, although it should be more visible when pulled out / engaged.
There is no annunciation and it doesn't generate a takeoff config warning. Don't know about the XLS+ but it's probably similar.
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Old 30th Sep 2021, 20:37
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Originally Posted by megan View Post
As the aircraft is certified to FAR 25 I'd have thought all take offs would be planned to be able to stop with failure at the EF point and the first stopping action taken at V1 (25.109 Accelerate-stop distance), or be able to continue the take off with one engine out if the failure occurs at a point where the first stopping action would be post V1 (25.111 Takeoff path).
The issue is that all takeoff calculations assume a fully functional aircraft up to the point of failure (identification). So yes, failure AT the EF point is fine. But this wasn't a case of a failure at the EF point, this appears to have been an aircraft grossly underperforming from the start of the TO run. Consequently, even if you should have plenty of runway to stop from V1 if everything is normal to that point, if you aren't accelerating fast enough you'll eat up a lot more runway geting to V1, and there won't be close to enough runway left to stop (indeed in an extreme case, you might not ever get to V1 before the end of the runway).

The part 25 runway performance criteria represent a standard which has been shown in practice to generally provide adequate safety margins for most failures or eventualities. They do NOT provide a guarantee for anything except the precise cases to which they apply.
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Old 1st Oct 2021, 18:56
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No timing any more?
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Old 2nd Oct 2021, 12:48
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You mean the way the do it with fully loaded long-range freighters? Start a stopwatch at the beginning of the take-off roll and see if it takes 40 or 45 seconds to reach V1? Not really practicable with something like a Citation Excel. A lightly loaded one like this will reach V1 in less than 10 seconds from a static thrust takeoff, followed by Vr within the next second. No time to look at a stopwatch or anything but really essential instruments.
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Old 2nd Oct 2021, 15:17
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So, the flip side is that it should be a lot more obvious when the acceleration is led than expected.
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Old 3rd Oct 2021, 13:03
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Yes, one would probably notice that something isn't quite as usual. But then, on a short runway (*) like the one in this accident and with a lightly loaded aircraft, the crew was probably go-minded, at least I would have been: Abort only for red lights or really severe things like fire, loss of (directional) control or similar. Since they probably had no indication of any malfunction I can understand why they kept going after V1.

BTW: Out of curiosity last week I attempted, sort of, a takeoff with the parking brake set in our C560 (not a C560XL as in the accident, but the performance is very similar). Also lightly loaded. The tyres started slipping on the dry concrete runway at around 65% N1, the takeoff setting was 89%. It would have easily been possible to start the takeoff run with the brake still set. How they were able to line up on the runway with the parking brake on is a mystery to me however. Especially the 90 degree turn from the taxiway onto a narrow runway usually requires some differential braking (no steering tiller on the Excel!) which they won't have had with the parking brake on.

(*) At 1100m length this runway would be way to short for our commercial operation in the EASA part of the world.
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Old 4th Oct 2021, 12:19
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An unnoficial time to 80 kts check is worth doing. You will have an idea of how long would be normal after a few observations and then if you are taking longer, consider your next step.
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Old 4th Oct 2021, 20:17
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Or try to take note of how much power is typically needed to move forward from a stopped position(or how quickly you move forward at idle power) and note if it seems unusually slow for the given power setting.
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Old 5th Oct 2021, 16:19
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Maybe they applied it as a desperate measure to stop, once they decided to abort? I'm quite familiar with D0328TP runway excursion, where they applied the parking brake during their attempts to stop. Incident: DANA D328 at Port Harcourt on Jan 23rd 2019, runway excursion on landing
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Old 5th Oct 2021, 16:57
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Originally Posted by 212man View Post
I'm quite familiar with D0328TP runway excursion, where they applied the parking brake during their attempts to stop.
According to your report they applied the emergency brake, not the parking brake. Applying the parking brake in a Citation whilst in motion will achieve nothing that the brake pedals won't achieve on their own: It closes a valve that traps the brake pressure (which needs to be applied with the pedals first) inside the brake lines. Exactly as in a Cessna 152 many piots will know from their early training days. If you just pull the parking brake lever nothing at all will happen. But the Citations do also have a nitrogen operated emergency brake that can be used when there is no hydraulic pressure. It will not provide the same braking power as the normal brake and no antiskid either. What we know so far about this accident is that they did not try to stop but attempted to get airborne.
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Old 7th Oct 2021, 12:35
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Originally Posted by what next View Post
According to your report they applied the emergency brake, not the parking brake. Applying the parking brake in a Citation whilst in motion will achieve nothing that the brake pedals won't achieve on their own: It closes a valve that traps the brake pressure (which needs to be applied with the pedals first) inside the brake lines. Exactly as in a Cessna 152 many piots will know from their early training days. If you just pull the parking brake lever nothing at all will happen. But the Citations do also have a nitrogen operated emergency brake that can be used when there is no hydraulic pressure. It will not provide the same braking power as the normal brake and no antiskid either. What we know so far about this accident is that they did not try to stop but attempted to get airborne.
I think the 328 system is one and the same:
Should the normal braking system fail, an emergency braking facility powered by the
auxiliary hydraulic system is available. The emergency braking system is also used
to operate the parking brake. The pressure required to operate the
emergency/parking brake system is stored in an emergency/park brake accumulator.
If pressure is still available in the pressure line of the main hydraulic system when the
emergency/parking brake is applied, the pressure will automatically charge the
emergency/parking brake accumulator via the pilot check valve.
However, I fully understand your explanation of the Cessna system and agree it seems unlikely
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