Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Non-Airline Forums > Accidents and Close Calls
Reload this Page >

Stearman prang in Texas 2/10/21 - no injuries...

Accidents and Close Calls Discussion on accidents, close calls, and other unplanned aviation events, so we can learn from them, and be better pilots ourselves.

Stearman prang in Texas 2/10/21 - no injuries...

Old 3rd Oct 2021, 09:30
  #1 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 57
Posts: 9,077
Stearman prang in Texas 2/10/21 - no injuries...

Ummmm... take off from a highway in Winnie. just east of Houston. The aircraft had taken part in a street parade apparently. Ooops!

treadigraph is online now  
Old 3rd Oct 2021, 11:36
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Farnborough
Posts: 51
Taking off from a road. Is that allowed in the UK?
munnst is offline  
Old 3rd Oct 2021, 15:05
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: France
Posts: 987
No idea. Maybe in the USA, which is where the accident happened, it might be allowed?
Piper.Classique is offline  
Old 3rd Oct 2021, 18:31
  #4 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 57
Posts: 9,077
I think the CAA would take a somewhat jaundiced view in the UK. However, I do know of a Rallye that force landed in a small meadow alongside the A30 in Devon many years ago. Whatever was troubling it was easily fixed but the field was unsuitable for take off, so it was craned over the wall and with suitable permission and the assistance of the local plod, it departed safely from the road.

Another video out there of a force landed C210 hitting something and ending up rather crumpled while attempting a take off from a US road some years ago.
treadigraph is online now  
Old 4th Oct 2021, 20:04
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Farnborough
Posts: 51
Seems such an unescessary accident and loss of aircraft.

Last edited by munnst; 5th Oct 2021 at 10:42.
munnst is offline  
Old 4th Oct 2021, 20:34
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Moray,Scotland,U.K.
Posts: 1,651
If the Local Authority and the Police give permission for a road to be closed and a private aircraft to land and take-off from it, without pax, would the CAA's permission be required anywhere in the UK? Assuming the insurance was valid.
If it was a static display, not flying during the show, authorisation would appear not needed.
Maoraigh1 is online now  
Old 5th Oct 2021, 00:25
  #7 (permalink)  
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 60
Posts: 5,001
In North America, sometimes roads are used, with official tolerance. I cannot comment this event, but an airplane on the road is not out of the question. It is certainly done in rural farming areas for crop duster operations.


Pilot DAR is online now  
Old 7th Oct 2021, 20:15
  #8 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 57
Posts: 9,077
Another view on Facebook - hmmmm.

https://tinyurl.com/yzurtse8
treadigraph is online now  
Old 7th Oct 2021, 20:36
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 13,360
Interesting - could the sudden yaw before becoming airborne suggest a power failure ?
DaveReidUK is online now  
Old 7th Oct 2021, 20:48
  #10 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 57
Posts: 9,077
He appears to drift onto the median which looks a bit like one of those storm water ditches then hoicks it off - the first video the engine sounds pretty much on song to me.
treadigraph is online now  
Old 7th Oct 2021, 23:35
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: 4DME
Posts: 2,242
Traffic lights must have been on red,.... get my coat...
N707ZS is offline  
Old 8th Oct 2021, 00:52
  #12 (permalink)  
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 60
Posts: 5,001
Well... Were I to speculate, I would suggest that the road was unusually narrow for the view expected by a back seat pilot in a Stearman. When he pitched up to rotate (perhaps a little underspeed), he also suffered a reduction in directional perception, so drifted left. The effort to get back on track both used up energy, and disoriented the pilot, so he tried to outclimb the wires with too little speed, and stalled over them.
Pilot DAR is online now  
Old 8th Oct 2021, 05:02
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: unknown
Posts: 3
Regardless of the drift off the paved surface, it really doesn’t look like he had enough space to takeoff and get over the power lines.
tcasblue is offline  
Old 8th Oct 2021, 11:22
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Farnborough
Posts: 51
Everything about that takeoff looks wrong. Oh well. It'll buff out.
munnst is offline  
Old 9th Oct 2021, 03:42
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: N/A
Posts: 4,188
One analysis.

megan is offline  
Old 9th Oct 2021, 11:20
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Miles away
Posts: 82
Looking at the Facebook clip, initially all looks OK, but then it seems the pilot decided to abort the take off and the tail lowers, but then changed his mind and decides to continue. By then it was too late
Procrastinus is offline  
Old 9th Oct 2021, 13:24
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: England
Posts: 705
Interesting - could the sudden yaw before becoming airborne suggest a power failure ?
Probably just old fashioned propeller theory - An attitude change leads to changes in the directional forces from the propeller and even the forces (drag) on each wheel. Quite possibly a classic case here of the drift and slower acceleration due to attitude change. Then even more drag from the sloping grass surface possibly leading to a slightly longer than expected TORR.

The propeller theory related to this accident will most likely be quoted in tail dragger lessons for years to come.
Miles Magister is offline  
Old 9th Oct 2021, 18:54
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Farnborough
Posts: 51
I suggest everyone watches the video that Megan posted.
Lots of good information from a well respected pilot.
The most obvious comment made in that video was "could have just towed the aircraft the 3 miles to the airport" which really sums up the accident.
Why attempt a difficult or dangerous takeoff from a road when you could have just towed it?
As Scott says "If it's difficult, dangerous or different" then don't do it.
munnst is offline  
Old 10th Oct 2021, 13:25
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: unknown
Posts: 3
Originally Posted by munnst View Post

Why attempt a difficult or dangerous takeoff from a road when you could have just towed it?
The same question about a takeoff still applies, even if there is no nearby airport(eg. Fuel leak resulted in successful off airport landing. Fuel replenished but takeoff difficult and dangerous…..call out the mechanics to take the aircraft apart to put on a truck.)
tcasblue is offline  
Old 10th Oct 2021, 20:37
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Germany
Age: 57
Posts: 46
400 meters takeoff run over a 50 feet pole will not work in a normal 220 horsepower stearman.

Analysis from Blancoliro
krohmie is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.