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Working Life After Flying

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Working Life After Flying

Old 2nd May 2020, 17:57
  #61 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 74
Anyone got experience in leaving aviation to join med school?
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Old 2nd May 2020, 18:44
  #62 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: england
Posts: 739
Wow...I guess you’d have to be relatively young to countenance Med school....?
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Old 2nd May 2020, 20:17
  #63 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 74
I wish I was. But I guess that depends on what you call young. Anyway that's besides the point. I believe one is never too old to learn new things.
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Old 2nd May 2020, 23:12
  #64 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 74
Originally Posted by Satoshi Nakamoto View Post
Please forget the idea of leaving aviation to walk into a med school or becoming an investment banker, if your only skill or qualification is flying then unless you can fly you will be on the minimum wage.
Maybe you got a different idea of med school, but this is to achieve a different degree and follow a different Job. The qualification you get after completing med school/University. That's Kind of the point here, to achieve a qualification in an interesting and Well respected profession. So my question is, if anyone done that before. I don't need a lecture on my Chances without a qualification outside aviation.
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Old 3rd May 2020, 03:18
  #65 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: England
Posts: 1
Aviation Lecturee

For anyone that may be interested i just saw an aviation lecturer job going at Southampton University, could be a golden opportunity to see through this awful time.
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Old 3rd May 2020, 06:52
  #66 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: hang on let me check
Posts: 616
Guys just to give it a little break, aviation is vital to any countryís economy. Itís simply needed. So letís wait it out, hopefully those who lose their jobs will be back flying soon enough, but letís not forget that pilots and aviation are a fundamental need of any nation, and they should be treated as such. In the meantime letís wait as calmly as possible. We are getting more nervous by the day, but if we understand that they MUST have airlines and pilots, everything is not so black all of a sudden.
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Old 3rd May 2020, 09:16
  #67 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Brexland
Posts: 89
I looked at med school out of curiosity and it's a non starter, takes about 9 years to fully qualify and when you factor in the clinical and university fees (in the UK or US) it is probably MORE expensive than training to be a pilot all over again!
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Old 3rd May 2020, 10:06
  #68 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Borders
Posts: 21
Although it would almost certainly take significantly longer than nine years to qualify as a consultant, in the UK anyone with a good degree is eligible for graduate entry medicine which is a four year course. The NHS pays the fees in year four. You'd be working as a doctor from year five onwards on the normal NHS pay scale. It is an option, but winning a place to study is far more competitive and difficult than getting a space on an airline tagged scheme at an ATO, and all applicants will have a massive amount of healthcare experience, whether extensive volunteering or working in allied professions such as nursing, optometry, pharmacy etc.

Last year when I was discussing it with my AME, he did say that I'd be absolutely mad to consider medicine, and he's actively discouraged his own kids from going down the medicine route. Sound familiar?

Law would be another possible option. For graduates with any degree, the Graduate Diploma in Law is a one year course that puts you in the same position as a law graduate to apply for the professional phase of training and apply for trainee lawyer positions.

Last year when I was discussing it with a family friend who is a barrister, he did say that I'd be absolutely mad to etc.
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Old 3rd May 2020, 10:12
  #69 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 74
Well it works a bit different where I am from. The whole course takes 6 years to completely, then afterwards you work for 5 years as an intern to be able to specialize in a specific direction. Studying is possible in easter europe and won't be very hard to get in.
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Old 3rd May 2020, 10:43
  #70 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Oxford UK
Age: 41
Posts: 117
It's possible. As we all have plenty of time I would suggest reading 'who moved my cheese' a very short management book about dealing with change, and the different way people do or don't do it. Some deny it it's happening, some will wait around for something to happen and others will get going with something else.
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Old 3rd May 2020, 14:19
  #71 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Uk
Posts: 0
Yes, it’s a tricky one convincing HR bods you will be happy in a £25k job when you’ve been a god of the skies.....

Hard to be taken seriously, even harder to convince you’ve had enough and want to make a clean break of it
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Old 3rd May 2020, 18:36
  #72 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: USA/England
Posts: 10
I was facing this predicament in 2009, when the airline industry was being crushed due to the financial crisis, and had no backup options because of a useless Professional Pilot type of degree that wasn't transferable to the real world. I tried applying everywhere, but even with a few friends vouching for me, all of my resumes were rejected because there was no experience overlap. After starting a Master's in Finance and attending career fairs, still no luck because automated resume systems just kicked my resume out at large firms.

The savior ended up being a small business government defense contractor with less than 50 employees who specialized in aeronautical data. I emailed an actual person my resume and they offered to hire me at a rate not quite as high as my previous regional airline captain level, but considerably better than first officer. They bought me time to finish my degree and practice working with tech knowledge like databases and scripting, which I then applied to the finance industry and was able to break into asset management, where I've been ever since, working as a financial manager in a fintech role.

I've chronicled the entire process of changing my career in my blog in the hopes it might help other pilots in a similar situation (I can't post the link because I don't have 10 posts on the forum here, but it's called the Golden Goose Guide). Feel free to let me know if you have any questions.
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Old 4th May 2020, 02:37
  #73 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: EU
Posts: 34
My outlook on this whole situation seems to be a little more Que Sera Sera than most.

Im 30 and currently furloughed after nearly 2 years in the business with redundancy very likely. However I never expected to get a job in the flight deck in the first place. Itís not the ďnormĒ for my upbringing.

Iím from a very working class family and I went the down the working multiple jobs route to pay the £70k for modular training, qualified at 23 and my parents didnít contribute a penny blah blah blah. (Iíll put the violin away now)

When most of my flight training pals got their first jobs it wasnít so much of a big deal to their familyís. After all if they hadnít become pilots they would have been lawyers, doctors or in finance etc. In their social circles it was just expected to have those kinds of high flying careers.

For me and my social circle it was a massive achievement. My family and most of my home town friends work in mundane office, retail type jobs paying under £25k. So to them me becoming a pilot was the talk of the town and not always in a positive way. Itís funny how envious people can be of success.

Even the skippers comment on how Iím the ďroughestĒ pilot theyíve ever met. Honestly sometimes in the crew room I feel like Leonardo DiCaprio in that scene in Titanic where he joins the first class passengers for dinner.

However I can 100% understand the fear some pilots (especially those brought up in the upper middle class) have whoís siblings and family friends children etc all have high flying jobs.

Letís face it there arenít many jobs that you can just switch to that pay the same as your average pilot gig and we canít all be train drivers. Falling from grace is an embarrassing and worrying prospect.

My biggest fear is losing the opportunity to fly and not the reduced income. Earning more than £30k for me was always a dream and one that Iíve achieved. But with the way Iíve been brought up, earning £25k in some boring office job isnít such a worry but more of a minor financial inconvenience.

I still havenít got out of that working class lifestyle: peanuts mortgage, old banger on the drive, the love of a £4.99 Wetherspoons breakfast etc etc.

I feel sorry for some of my colleagues that have a terrible shock to the system fast approaching: leased Audiís that need to be paid for, the prospect of taking little Mary out of private school or downsizing the 4 bed detached house in Surrey.

Itís very hard for some people to realise you can have a happy life in a job that pays less than the national average. Overtime your lifestyles will adjust accordingly, youíve just got to stay positive.

I really hope in 12 months time we are all laughing at how scared we were about losing our wings having gained or retained our flying jobs.
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Old 4th May 2020, 08:41
  #74 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: uk
Age: 71
Posts: 80
Hey Trent210

You can be my wingman anytime!
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Old 4th May 2020, 09:25
  #75 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Uk
Posts: 0
Yeah , very true, Trent 210.

I’ve never lived up to the salary , because I’ve never trusted this industry . Thus if I have to do a less well paid job, we will survive.

And you are also right about the sort of people who get jealous about the whole pilot thing ( I’ve met a fair few ) and they are always from the same demographic
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Old 4th May 2020, 09:45
  #76 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Planet no. 3
Posts: 101
Originally Posted by TRENT210 View Post
My outlook on this whole situation seems to be a little more Que Sera Sera than most.

My biggest fear is losing the opportunity to fly and not the reduced income. Earning more than £30k for me was always a dream and one that Iíve achieved. But with the way Iíve been brought up, earning £25k in some boring office job isnít such a worry but more of a minor financial inconvenience.

I still havenít got out of that working class lifestyle: peanuts mortgage, old banger on the drive, the love of a £4.99 Wetherspoons breakfast etc etc.
This is well written and sums up my experience too. Stoicism on a personal level helps to survive in this cruel world.
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Old 4th May 2020, 10:02
  #77 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: EU
Posts: 34
It must be so scary for some of the pilots I’ve met along the way, that went integrated at 18, who are now mid 30’s on £100k+. Most of which have never done a single days work outside the flight deck in their lives.

If they lose their pilot job there isn’t many jobs (if any) that pay that much without serious retraining. Only about 20% of UK taxpayers earn over £40k so it’s clear to see there won’t be high flying jobs for all the grounded pilot.

Getting passed HR is a nightmare. I’ve been doing temp office work these last couple of weeks to top up my furlough money. Even though it’s temp the company still want you to be available to them until they don’t need you not until you don’t need them anymore. So to get passed the first hurdle I told them I’d been made redundant from the airline and my base captain kindly backed it up on my reference. The interview consisted of a 5 min Skype chat and I was offered the job on the spot.

I went into the office for the first time thinking to myself keep the flying job under the radar... boom I’m sat about 3ft away from someone I went to school with, someone I have on Facebook. So now the whole office knows I’m a pilot. It’s a very surreal situation, almost like they don’t know how to talk to me as just a regular work colleague. I’ve been asked multiple times by the same person what the scariest part of flying is so either he doesn’t listen or he’s just trying too hard to make conversation.

Although I’m only hoping to be there temporarily I’ve already accepted I’ll never be “one of them” through no fault of my own. I don’t march up and down the office in my uniform nor do I start every conversation with “when I was a pilot...”. I’m actually from their social circle so I can only imagine how they would treat Lawrence or Hugh the privately educated, been in the business since puberty, pilot

Last edited by TRENT210; 4th May 2020 at 10:22.
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Old 4th May 2020, 14:32
  #78 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: London
Posts: 5
Sign up where?
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Old 5th May 2020, 01:21
  #79 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: England
Posts: 484
What an incredibly emotionally mature post. I’m at the other end of the career ladder but I truly hope I share a flight deck with you at some point. In fact, sod the job, just name the pub and I’ll buy you a pint!
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Old 5th May 2020, 08:25
  #80 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: uk
Posts: 882
Good post, you are not alone in your background. I have met a good few along the way that grew up on council estates or had outside toilets as kids. One advantage we have, as I discussed Thomas Cook going down last year with a colleague of a similar background, is that having been poor in the past, the adjustment back to a smaller income is fairly straightforward mentally. Like you, I have a banger on the drive, no mortgage, the kids went to state school (and Russell Group Uni's) and enough modest toys to keep me happy. I wish you all the best for your next job. Best bit of advice for the future, when you have a Captains salary, only have a First Officers outgoings and a years salary in the bank.
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