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MEL and push back

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MEL and push back

Old 27th Apr 2023, 09:14
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MEL and push back

Hi,

I realise the MEL is only active when aircraft is moving under its own power for take off. Although prudent to look at it anyway.

Question is say if you get a PACK light (etc) on after engine start but still connected to the tug? What do you do? What happens if they had disconnected the tug? NNC obviously but also back to stand ? Or continue ? Then MEL it on next sector with mx.

Thanks
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Old 27th Apr 2023, 10:15
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You have that the wrong way round, the MEL is active up until the aircraft moves under its own power.
so if you have an issue after engine start but before taxi you have to consult the MEL. Once you start taxiing you don’t have to consult the MEL but it would be prudent to do so.
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Old 27th Apr 2023, 10:41
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I am out of the game now so my recollections might be outdated but the MEL regulations used to state that the operator is responsible for establishing procedures for failures which occur between the point of when the aircraft first moves under its own power and the start of the take off run.
The UK CAA example was 'The provisions of the MEL are applicable until the aircraft commences the flight.'

MM
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Old 27th Apr 2023, 12:05
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Depends where you are and if there is engineering support available at departure or destination airfield. Silly to get to destination and find that the defect is not allowable under the MEL but there is no engineering support readily available when you could have gone back to stand and got it fixed before departing.

Last edited by Don Coyote; 27th Apr 2023 at 12:35.
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Old 27th Apr 2023, 12:40
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The FAA also says the MEL can be used up to the beginning of takeoff. Airbus says the MEL apples before taxi so different operators will do it differently.
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Old 27th Apr 2023, 14:20
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Originally Posted by Paulm1949
Hi,

I realise the MEL is only active when aircraft is moving under its own power for take off. Although prudent to look at it anyway.

Question is say if you get a PACK light (etc) on after engine start but still connected to the tug? What do you do? What happens if they had disconnected the tug? NNC obviously but also back to stand ? Or continue ? Then MEL it on next sector with mx.

Thanks
Hi,

As You correctly write, In EASA land the MEL is applicable till the ‘Commencement of flight’ i.e. the point when an aeroplane begins to move under its own power for the purpose of preparing for take-off. With that being said "Operators should include guidance in the MEL to deal with any failures which occur between the commencement of the flight and the start of the take-off".

So in Your scenario you are still under the MEL dispatch applicability. A lot will depend on the type of failure and whether or not as flight crew You are authorized to raise MELs and dispatch yourself. What usually happens with many Operators nowadays is that flight crew hold authorization to enter and dispatch MELs items that do not require any maintenance action or might only require a minor maintenance action such as a reset of circuit breakers. If that is your case and the failure you have allows it, you can raise the defect and dispatch yourself according to the MEL.

Once You have started moving under your own power and end up with a failure, it is up to your operator to include guidance on what they want you to do. For example my operator requires that if an MEL has a maintenance procedure to be performed it's a NO GO, same story if it's a NO DISPATCH item. So back to the stand. But again different guidelines exist so check your MEL PREAMBLE and your OM-A chapter 8.6 or the chapter that deals with MEL applicability to know what to do.
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Old 27th Apr 2023, 20:52
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Depending on your aircraft manufacturer they may give further guidance. Airbus give specific guidance on how to handle failures between the point of dispatch and takeoff.
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Old 28th Apr 2023, 07:54
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"A Recall on the Correct Use of the MEL" is an article in Airbus Safety First Magazine Issue 25, will be very helpful, I recommend.
You can find if you google it
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