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Engine failure 737 Realize and react

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Engine failure 737 Realize and react

Old 9th Jul 2007, 09:33
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Engine failure 737 Realize and react

Guys,

how to solve the problem best, how do you do it? Just kick the ball? or kicking the triangle, or just watch the primary engine instruments? how long do we have time to detect an engine failure and react at a v1 cut?

sicerely


od
Olendirk is offline  
Old 9th Jul 2007, 09:58
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Engine failure at take off, you control the yaw with the rudder to maintain the runway centre line and then lock off your leg. Once airborne keep the wings level and make sure you are flying the correct heading.

Any other engine failure scenario, you initially control the roll using aileron, and then apply rudder to bring the control column back to neutral. The end result should be wings level, on a constant heading with the control column neutral. We identify which rudder to press by pushing whichever side of the column is low. Ie, if you need to turn the control column to the right in order to keep wings level, then you push the right rudder until the control column comes back to neutral, you then trim. We are no taught to use the slip indicator on the PFD.

How quickly? Quick enough to keep the runway centre line. Identifying the engine you can use the dead leg, dead engine theory.

SW
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Old 9th Jul 2007, 10:03
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but when the engine failure comes at just after Vr? allso the aileron tactic?
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Old 9th Jul 2007, 10:29
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Indeed. Keep wings level.
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Old 9th Jul 2007, 11:16
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I wouldn't disagree with any of the above but don't forget to rotate smoothly to the correct pitch attitude as well.
If you do that the it will climb out nicely at the correct speed, and you can get it back on track easily once you have the pitch/speed nailed with rudder and a litle aileron if needed.
I have seen so many people in the sim get fixated with kicking the rudders rather than smoothly controlling the swing they end up chasing the speed and pitch all the way up to Acceleration height.
The other interesting one is an engine fire warning without loss of thrust where pilots start putting the boot in before the aircraft has even started to swing.
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Old 9th Jul 2007, 12:52
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And if the engine failure occurs shortly after V1 with a good spread of 5-15 knots between V1 and VR, then expect a significantly heavier than normal pull force on the control column at VR. This is because the stabiliser trim setting from the load sheet is designed to give you an in-trim stick force at a two-engine V2+15 knots.

With an engine failure, the vertical vector of engine thrust is effectively halved thus giving the appearance and feel of a nose heavy rotation. Coupled with the natural tendency for the 737 rotation forces to hesitate on passing ten degrees of body angle due to the tailplane lowering into ground effect, the end result is that you need to hold a strong back pressure to rotate to 13 degrees body angle for the initial fly-away on one engine. Use of early stab trim may be needed after gear up. Often see pilots fly back onto the runway momentarily when rotating with engine failure at VI because the stick force surprised them and they stop rotating at 8-10 degrees. And don't ask for gear up until positive rate of climb on altimeter - not IVSI. See Boeing 737 FCTM.

PS. If the flight director needles spook you after coping with initial engine failure and their two needles are dancing around the ADI then avoid chasing the needles. Best thing is to quickly switch your scan to the standby ADI which is a basic artificial horizon unencumbered by FD needles and use the standby ADI as a raw data means of keeping wings level. Once you have the climb-out under control wings level on one engine, then shift your scan back from the standby ADI to the main ADI flight director needles which by then will hopefully be centred. That said, this does not necessarily apply to the first officer handling from RH seat as the standby ADI has parallax error.
Tee Emm is offline  
Old 10th Jul 2007, 08:28
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Join Date: Jul 2007
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If you use too much of aileron during the initial stage of an engine failure wouldnt it cause drag by causing spoilers to come up.Also why does the fctm say that positive climb before gear up is with reference to the altimeter.Thanks for your inputs here.Its very helpful.
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Old 10th Jul 2007, 12:16
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why does the fctm say that positive climb before gear up is with reference to the altimeter.Thanks for your inputs here.Its very helpful.
Something to do with the IVSI may give false rate of climb indication during rotation - but am unsure of the technical reason.
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Old 10th Jul 2007, 13:48
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Never "kick" the rudders - apply rudder smoothly to stop the yaw and keep the wings level with aileron.
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