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Recent 7700 squawk

Old 18th Mar 2019, 19:30
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Recent 7700 squawk

Just been watching this on FR24 and it looks to my untrained eye that it had problems. Descended then flew straight (autopilot?) for ages before descending again nowhere near an airport. It did seem to have some pitch control when it got close to the ground. I'm a complete amateur so I'm just hoping I'm not jumping to conclusions. https://www.flightradar24.com/DEPLD/1fd8293e
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Old 18th Mar 2019, 21:49
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Bad link

Sorry, its a duff link.
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Old 18th Mar 2019, 21:58
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Sorry, works for me, even after logging out of FR24.
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Old 18th Mar 2019, 22:46
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Look like emergency descend out of FL190, turned 90° off track soon after initiating the descend (aviate), wandered around a bit before regaining original track (navigate) and started the 7700 squawk (communicate)
With Limoges airport within range for diversion, however, climbed back to FL90 and continued to destination.
Pressurization issue jumps to mind.
Beats me why the 7700 is maintained, while things seem to stabilize and the normal flight (although lower cruise level) is resumed to destination (almost 1 hr. flight time)

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Old 26th Mar 2019, 08:25
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Originally Posted by DIBO View Post
Look like emergency descend out of FL190, turned 90° off track soon after initiating the descend (aviate), wandered around a bit before regaining original track (navigate) and started the 7700 squawk (communicate)
Wouldn't it have been sensible to squawk ASAP, instead of 'wandering around a bit' and putting other traffic at risk? This whole A/N/C axiom strikes me as archaic. I'm sure it was fine in the 1930s when there wasn't much else around.
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Old 26th Mar 2019, 14:05
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Originally Posted by El Bunto View Post
Wouldn't it have been sensible to squawk ASAP, instead of 'wandering around a bit' and putting other traffic at risk? This whole A/N/C axiom strikes me as archaic. I'm sure it was fine in the 1930s when there wasn't much else around.
Interesting view. So you think it is rather more important to set a squawk instead of first getting the airplane under control or finding out where you are and where you are going?
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Old 27th Mar 2019, 08:02
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Originally Posted by Denti View Post
Interesting view. So you think it is rather more important to set a squawk instead of first getting the airplane under control or finding out where you are and where you are going?
How many pilot(s) does it take to operate an aircraft and how many pilot(s) does it take to operate a radio and twiddle a few buttons on a transponder?
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Old 27th Mar 2019, 08:33
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Originally Posted by El Bunto View Post
Wouldn't it have been sensible to squawk ASAP, instead of 'wandering around a bit' and putting other traffic at risk? This whole A/N/C axiom strikes me as archaic. I'm sure it was fine in the 1930s when there wasn't much else around.
Where do you draw the line?

If you can get a squawk in quickly to let ATC know then you may as well make a quick radio call to let the controllers know what for. And if you can do that you can make a quick PA to let the passengers know. And if you can do tha- oh look, you’ve passed out due to hypoxia/hit a mountain because you weren’t paying attention to the bigger picture.

Mountains, stalls, depressurisations will kill you. Setting off someone else’s TCAS is a minor inconvenience which can be solved with a bit of paperwork.

ANC (or FNC depending on what you fly) is easy to remember, easy to do, and works for every situation. Which is why it’s taught. Start going off piste and making judgement calls as to whether the C is more important when you’re at 200 feet following an EFATO and you’ll start bending aircraft...

You may also find sims get a bit more difficult if you decide you don’t agree with ANC
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Old 27th Mar 2019, 17:38
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Originally Posted by Harry Wayfarers View Post
How many pilot(s) does it take to operate an aircraft and how many pilot(s) does it take to operate a radio and twiddle a few buttons on a transponder?
Well, in this case there was only one pilot most likely, that type of aircraft is not usually flown by more at a time.

That said, yes, in many cases it needs two pilots to work through ANC, and yes, communication is the last needed thing. That is precisely why we have our colleagues on the ground to assure safe operation of those around us. And they do have their own tools to help them of course, as we do have tools to help, or as it happened recently, kill us.
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