Spectators Balcony (Spotters Corner) If you're not a professional pilot but want to discuss issues about the job, this is the best place to loiter. You won't be moved on by 'security' and there'll be plenty of experts to answer any questions.

Airport Handling frequency

Old 27th Dec 2016, 20:56
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Sweden
Posts: 20
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Airport Handling frequency

Hello,

I've been wondering for quite a while what the handling frequency is about - for example, at the charts for ESSA, it might say: Arlanda Handling: 131.450? At what point would pilots have to call that frequency, and what are they actually handling? Since, the normal ground operations are communicated via the interphone between the flightdeck and the ground personell, I don't really see why there's a frequency that is called handling at most airports.

Thanks in advance.
Levelmind is offline  
Old 28th Dec 2016, 00:07
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Wildest Surrey
Age: 74
Posts: 9,639
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
It's for ordering the honeywagon to attend the aircraft when it's parked.(plus any other important things like wheelchair assistance for a passenger, catering needs, maintenence etc)
chevvron is offline  
Old 28th Dec 2016, 09:45
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Berkshire, UK
Age: 78
Posts: 8,268
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<<I don't really see why there's a frequency that is called handling at most airports. >

So that the crew can contact their agents while airborne. I don't know the situation nowadays but in the past many large airlines had their own frequencies, e.g Bealine Ops, Speedbird Ops, etc.
HEATHROW DIRECTOR is offline  
Old 28th Dec 2016, 21:15
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: jersey
Age: 73
Posts: 1,381
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Still do, HD.
kcockayne is offline  
Old 30th Dec 2016, 15:02
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: London
Posts: 560
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
To get an idea of what is said on Company channels try liveatc.net.

Airport Detail: KJFK | LiveATC.net

Click on KJFK Company Channels.

It can be very interesting at times.

(Listening to ATC in the US and I presume to US ATC via the internet in this country is legal.)

(I've just edited the line above to make it clear that I am referring to listening to overseas ATC transmissions on the net. I do believe that LiveATC.net says that it cannot carry transmissions from UK airports due to local laws.)

Last edited by Peter47; 1st Jan 2017 at 22:33. Reason: See last paragraph
Peter47 is offline  
Old 30th Dec 2016, 16:10
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Berkshire, UK
Age: 78
Posts: 8,268
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Listening to ATC in the UK is illegal.
HEATHROW DIRECTOR is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2017, 19:01
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Either the back of a sim, or wherever Crewing send me.
Posts: 1,019
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
We call the handling company about 20-30 minutes prior to arrival. We advise them of our expected arrival time, how many passengers we have, whether we have any passengers that require assistance, and to order things like toilet service and fuel trucks. They can also advise us if our gate sobthat we can plan our possible taxi route and brief this.
Johnny F@rt Pants is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2017, 20:25
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: clevedon
Posts: 30
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Despite H D's post No 6,have done and still do.I have often wondered if the rather cryptic messages"2Sierras" or "3Romeos," refer to possibly Ambi lift passengers,and others who are "semi"mobile.Any knowledge gratefully accepted.
Westlakejawa is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2017, 21:05
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 22
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
They are short for WCHR, WCHS etc:

WCHR: Passenger who can walk up and down stairs and move about in an aircraft cabin, but requires a wheelchair or other means for movements between the aircraft and the terminal, in the terminal and between arrival and departure points on the city side of the terminal.

WCHS: Passenger who cannot walk up or down stairs, but who can move about in an aircraft cabin and requires a wheelchair to move between the aircraft, in the terminal and between arrival and departure points on the city side of the terminal.

WCHP: Passenger with a disability of the lower limbs who has sufficient personal autonomy to take care of him/herself but who requires assistance to embark or disembark and who can move about in an aircraft cabin only with the help of an onboard wheelchair.

WCHC: Passenger who is completely immobile who can move about only with the help of a wheelchair or any other means and who requires assistance at all times from arrival at the airport to seating in the aircraft, or if necessary, in a special seat fitted to his/her specific needs the process being inverted at arrival.
G-MILF is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2017, 21:56
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: clevedon
Posts: 30
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
G-MILF Thanks.
Westlakejawa is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 17:07
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Stockport
Age: 82
Posts: 283
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
From HEATHROW DIRECTOR:

Listening to ATC in the UK is illegal.
I understand that this is the general caise, but that the prohibition may be waived in some locations and some cicumstances.

Many years ago there was a notice at the bottom of a stair outside the eastern end of the then only terminal at Manchester inviting members of the public to come up and get theit airband receivers checked for non-interference with ATC communications. This implies that there was then a general grant of permission to listen to ATC at Manchester. Has this permission ever been revoked?
Dairyground is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 19:51
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: world
Posts: 3,424
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Dairyground, HD is of course technically correct but he is becoming a little repetitive about it. The reality of course is that scanners have been used frequently by enthusiasts since I was a little kid and I have NEVER observed the law being enforced by either the police or anyone else. However, in these modern times, unless spotters/enthusiasts refrain from the urge of immediately posting on social media what they hear, this could well change in the future!
Hotel Tango is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 22:41
  #13 (permalink)  

Avoid imitations
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Wandering the FIR and cyberspace often at highly unsociable times
Posts: 13,951
Likes: 0
Received 25 Likes on 10 Posts
Pilots of some well known airlines can often be heard practicing their calls to their handling agents on 121.5.
ShyTorque is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 23:52
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London (Babylon-on-Thames)
Age: 41
Posts: 6,168
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Listening to ATC in the UK is illegal.
It's also tolerated as any Police conversation in three decades of doing so has proven.
Scanners are happily sold at airshows, some of the older generation just don't accept it's a harmless and enjoyable past time enjoyed by many. Indeed there's a lot of UK published books on the subject matter, but as Bren says, illegal in the UK #secretsquirrel

With fr24 now being a thing, I can't see HMG getting upset and cracking down, we have more pressing issues of state methinks.
Skipness One Echo is offline  
Old 20th Feb 2017, 16:18
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Heathrow
Posts: 66
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Skipness One Echo View Post
It's also tolerated as any Police conversation in three decades of doing so has proven.
Scanners are happily sold at airshows, some of the older generation just don't accept it's a harmless and enjoyable past time enjoyed by many. Indeed there's a lot of UK published books on the subject matter, but as Bren says, illegal in the UK #secretsquirrel

With fr24 now being a thing, I can't see HMG getting upset and cracking down, we have more pressing issues of state methinks.
I thought it was ok to listen but illegal to act or pass on any info received !
Dockwell is offline  
Old 20th Feb 2017, 16:25
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Berkshire, UK
Age: 78
Posts: 8,268
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I think Dockwell needs to acquaint himsself with the law!

Lots of people argue that it's "OK" because little is done about it..... same as those lunatics who break the law by driving along my road (40mph limit) at breakneck speed. Just because people do it is no reason for others to copy them. The law is the law!
HEATHROW DIRECTOR is offline  
Old 20th Feb 2017, 17:16
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: world
Posts: 3,424
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Oh for goodness sake HD do give it a rest! Driving above a 40mph speed limit is an entirely different story.
Hotel Tango is offline  
Old 20th Feb 2017, 18:59
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Hampshire
Age: 75
Posts: 821
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The law used to say it is OK to listen to, among other things, licensed broadcast radio and weather and navigation broadcasts. (found in this forum from 2003!). A search of the Ofcom site, which has taken over from the old agencies such as the GPO, shows nothing in this regard.
However, the question is "Does ATC traffic come under navigation broadcasts"? Clearly, instructions given to an aircraft by ATC must be considered "navigation" traffic. On the other hand, after 50 odd years in radio, I personally would consider it not to be a "broadcast" but a private system. After all, the users (airlines) are surely paying for these services, via airport use/navigation fees etc?
It seems to be a "law" that could keep a squadron of barristers in expensive and lucrative battles for years!
KelvinD is offline  
Old 20th Feb 2017, 19:17
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Berkshire, UK
Age: 78
Posts: 8,268
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
HT It is NOT a different story! I know that some of my ex-colleagues in ATC did not like the idea of people eavesdropping on them at work. Police transmissions are encrypted so Joe Soap cannot listen in. Pity that can't happen on the various air bands.....
HEATHROW DIRECTOR is offline  
Old 20th Feb 2017, 19:49
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 14,407
Likes: 0
Received 3 Likes on 2 Posts
Originally Posted by KelvinD View Post
The law used to say it is OK to listen to, among other things, licensed broadcast radio and weather and navigation broadcasts. (found in this forum from 2003!). A search of the Ofcom site, which has taken over from the old agencies such as the GPO, shows nothing in this regard.
Ofcom: Legal position and common questions on Receive-Only Radio Scanners
DaveReidUK is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.