Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Flight Deck Forums > Rumours & News
Reload this Page >

737 MAX some airframes withdrawn from service.

Rumours & News Reporting Points that may affect our jobs or lives as professional pilots. Also, items that may be of interest to professional pilots.

737 MAX some airframes withdrawn from service.

Old 9th Apr 2021, 12:58
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: uk
Posts: 890
737 MAX some airframes withdrawn from service.

Credit to Daily Telegraph 13:49 9th April 21
"Boeing is back in the headlines: Southwest Airlines is removing 30 of its 58 Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes from its schedule after a notification from the planemaker over a potential electrical issue, it said on Friday.

The airline said it has not experienced any known operational challenges related to the issue but has removed the 30 MAX 8s for further review.

"Southwest anticipates minimal disruption to our operation," it said (via Reuters).

The 737 MAX was grounded in 2019 after two crashes that killed 346 people. The plane was re-certified for flight by the FAA in November. "

Additional reporting here, may be behind paywall, would appear United and American also doing the same
https://www.thestreet.com/investing/...oduction-issue
macdo is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 13:51
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Washington
Posts: 2
From NY Times (unfortunately I can’t post link):Boeing said Friday it had notified 16 customers of a potential electrical issue with its troubled 737 Max plane and recommended that they temporarily stop flying some planes.

Boeing said airlines should verify that “that a sufficient ground path exists for a component of the electrical power system” on certain Max planes. The statement comes just months after airlines resumed flying the jet, which had been grounded for nearly two years because of a pair of accidents that killed nearly 350 people.

“We are working closely with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on this production issue,” Boeing said in a statement. “We are also informing our customers of specific tail numbers affected and we will provide direction on appropriate corrective actions.”
stevekstevek is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 14:20
  #3 (permalink)  
Paxing All Over The World
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Hertfordshire, UK.
Age: 64
Posts: 9,400
The question is: On which production line were these aircraft made?
PAXboy is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 14:22
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: attitude is nominal
Posts: 1,386
Not in Charleston.
Less Hair is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 15:21
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 12,817
Reuters reporting that the 16 affected operators include Alaskan, American, Southwest and United.
DaveReidUK is online now  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 15:21
  #6 (permalink)  
BRE
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Europe
Posts: 225
Wasn't there an article by an industry insider linked here that maintained the Indenesian crash reeked of an electrical problem?
BRE is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 15:57
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 662
PAXboy

Renton. The only 737 production line, AFAIK.
EEngr is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 16:12
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 662
BRE

I'd heard that this was an autothrottle problem. Which might be electrical. But the sources linked here state that the current problem (sorry about that ) is related to the electrical power system. That is common to so many aircraft systems that it would be hard to believe it would be missed on the SJ182 flight data recorder.

That Boeing says this problem might affect "certain Max planes" makes me think that it is either related to a particular power system option. Or due to a design change/manufacturing problem affecting a range of the production line sequence.
EEngr is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 17:11
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,071
Some Boeing 737Maxes grounded because not grounded.

Got it.
pattern_is_full is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 17:50
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Islas Baleares
Posts: 29
Taking every shortcut in the book during design, certification and production is really coming back to bite Boeing....
BewareOfTheSharklets is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 18:14
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Everett, WA
Age: 65
Posts: 3,202
According to the article in the Seattle Times, the problem was related to a production procedure change that was implemented after the grounding.
So only aircraft delivered since the grounding was lifted are affected.
tdracer is online now  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 18:53
  #12 (permalink)  

Only half a speed-brake
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Commuting home
Age: 43
Posts: 3,217
Sounds like BA is acting professional and responsible. The internet Agora still screams not sufficient and demands perfection or better, Easter living 21st century...


FlightDetent is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 20:29
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Washington.
Age: 71
Posts: 630
Trust is easier to keep than it is to regain.
GlobalNav is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 22:19
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Mars
Posts: 30
Airbus will never get sober. Yet another bottle of champagne
Qbix is offline  
Old 9th Apr 2021, 23:15
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Asia
Posts: 1,205
Boeing said airlines should verify that “that a sufficient ground path exists for a component of the electrical power system” on certain Max planes.
Sounds like a dodgy earth connection and must be pretty serious to justify grounding, though Boeing are obviously hyper careful with anything MAX related.

It sounds like poor assembly, rather than a problem with the component.
krismiler is offline  
Old 10th Apr 2021, 01:00
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Everett, WA
Age: 65
Posts: 3,202
No knowledge aside what I read in the Seattle Times, but educated guess is that someone came up with a different (easier) way to ground part of the system. The 'continued airworthiness' folks do periodic audits to make sure things age gracefully in-service (this I do know first hand - was involved in some of it years ago) - and they may have discovered that while the grounding path was fine when new (i.e. functional testing), it might not be after it got banged around in service.

Probably worth noting that this was apparently self-reported by Boeing. Maybe they are learning...
tdracer is online now  
Old 10th Apr 2021, 01:47
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 720
From Airways Mag Daily

https://airwaysmag.com/airlines/airl...-737-max-jets/
Chris2303 is online now  
Old 10th Apr 2021, 01:49
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 720
And the Seattle Times version

https://www.seattletimes.com/busines...-boeings-woes/
Chris2303 is online now  
Old 10th Apr 2021, 02:47
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 662
tdracer

From https://airwaysmag.com/airlines/airl...-737-max-jets/
"American said in a statement that only the planes it received after the return of the MAX to service were affected."

I assume this means planes they took delivery of after the November '20 re-cert. That's not a lot of service for things to come loose. I don't think they do any sorts of periodic checks on the system connections over such short intervals. So I suspect this was discovered when chasing down some sort of malfunction or anomaly.
EEngr is offline  
Old 10th Apr 2021, 09:30
  #20 (permalink)  
Pegase Driver
 
Join Date: May 1997
Location: Europe
Age: 71
Posts: 2,984
Chris2303

Pretty damning article if true. . . If I read this correctly .someone fixed cable bundles with plastic fasteners instead or the prescribed rivets that were there to ensure grounding , and id this on his own without supervision. Is this usual ?
and then this :
in a previously unreported problem, Boeing recently found a potential defect in a batch of 20 to 40 motors that move the horizontal stabilizer on all 737s, including the MAX and earlier models.
I realize that today Boeing is checking everything twice and is being 100% transparent, and that everything MAX related makes the news today , but it really cannot continue for too long before the flying public vote with their feet...
ATC Watcher is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.