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Electric powered commercial aircraft -- here we go!

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Electric powered commercial aircraft -- here we go!

Old 9th Dec 2019, 22:10
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Electric powered commercial aircraft -- here we go!

Harbour Air, of Vancouver BC, one of the world's most well-known (and reputable) operators of float planes, is on track for commercial flights in electrically powered aircraft. Much discussion among the pros here in Canada of some of the more challenging issues (i.e. How do you calculate such things as fuel requirements and fuel remaining?).

https://vancouverisland.ctvnews.ca/h...sday-1.4721986
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Old 10th Dec 2019, 00:37
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It flies, it flies!

I like the proportions and I know it’s sacrilege, but I think the long nose looks better than the round-engined Beaver, without being ludicrously long like the Turbo Beaver. In fact it reminds me of the lines of the original design, which was supposed to have a Gipsy Queen.




Last edited by India Four Two; 10th Dec 2019 at 00:55.
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Old 10th Dec 2019, 22:22
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here is the official news release which is intended for sharing.

Harbour Air and magniX Announce Successful Flight of World's First Commercial Electric Airplane



Inaugural flight is the first step in becoming the world's first all-electric commercial fleet

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Dec. 10, 2019 /CNW/ -- Harbour Air, North America's largest seaplane airline and magniX, the company powering the electric aviation revolution, today announced the successful flight of the world's first all-electric commercial aircraft. The successful flight of the ePlane, a six-passenger DHC-2 de Havilland Beaver magnified by a 750-horsepower (560 kW) magni500 propulsion system, took place on the Fraser River at Harbour Air Seaplanes terminal in Richmond (YVR South) this morning. The plane was piloted by Harbour Air CEO and founder Greg McDougall. This historic flight signifies the start of the third era in aviation – the electric age.The world's first fully electric commercial aircraft takes flight. The Harbour Air ePlane is magnified by the magniX magni500, a 750-horsepower electric propulsion system.The world's first fully electric commercial aircraft takes flight. The Harbour Air ePlane is magnified by the magniX magni500, a 750-horsepower electric propulsion system.The world's first fully electric commercial aircraft takes flight. The Harbour Air ePlane is magnified by the magniX magni500, a 750-horsepower electric propulsion system.The world's first fully electric commercial aircraft takes flight. The Harbour Air ePlane is magnified by the magniX magni500, a 750-horsepower electric propulsion system.(PRNewsfoto/magniX)

"Today, we made history," said Greg McDougall, CEO and founder of Harbour Air Seaplanes. "I am incredibly proud of Harbour Air's leadership role in re-defining safety and innovation in the aviation and seaplane industry. Canada has long held an iconic role in the history of aviation, and to be part of this incredible world-first milestone is something we can all be really proud of."

Earlier this year, Harbour Air announced its partnership with magniX and the company's intention to build the world's first completely electric commercial seaplane fleet. The magni500, which was unveiled at the Paris Air Show in June, 2019, is a high-power-density electric propulsion system that provides a clean and efficient way to power airplanes. Today that plan took flight and became a reality.

"In December 1903, the Wright Brothers launched a new era of transportation—the aviation age—with the first flight of a powered aircraft. Today, 116 years later, with the first flight of an all-electric powered commercial aircraft, we launched the electric era of aviation," said Roei Ganzarski, CEO of magniX. "The transportation industry and specifically the aviation segment that has been, for the most part, stagnant since the late 1930s, is ripe for a massive disruption. Now we are proving that low-cost, environmentally friendly, commercial electric air travel can be a reality in the very near future."

magniX and Harbour Air will now begin the certification and approval process for the propulsion system and the retrofitting of aircraft. Once the certification is complete, the rest of the fleet can be magnified with magniX's all-electric propulsion technology.

To see images and videos of the world's first all-electric commercial aircraft flight, please visit the media kit.

About Harbour Air
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 04:26
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Seriously looking forward to seeing the first commercial operations of an electric powered aircraft.
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 12:37
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one tonne batteries and 750-horsepower electric motors.
Motors - how many, more that one?
One tonne batteries?
How much fuel can the Turbo Beaver carry?
Is the a MTW that is lower than the MTOW?
How many pax can it carry with the batteries fully charged?
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 13:02
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6 pax must mean without baggage, or 3 pax with. (?) 100 miles range, and then a quick change of batteries?
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 13:04
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Lithium Ion batteries donít change mass when charging / discharging. A 1 ton battery would change less than one gram.

I'm interested to know the range and payload of the electric version. A traditional beaver can carry approx 650 litres which would weigh approx 500kg so thereís 500kg of payload gone if the battery really does weigh one ton. On the other hand weight is saved by removing the tanks, pumps, pipes and an electric motor weighs a lot less than an engine.

LD
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 13:06
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Every future landing of this short range aircraft will be heavy weight because of the heavy batteries. No wonder they picked a Beaver.
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 19:00
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Range is given as 160km or 86nm. But of course in general-public stories they never distinguish between absolute range and range-with-reserves. Reserves will be an issue as certification of ePlanes ramps up.

Nonetheless there are "enough" places in the world where that is a reasonable range. Only about 50nm between the site of this test flight and Victoria Harbour. Which would require ~25 minutes in this aircraft - but 180 minutes by car and ferry.

Similar for San Juan - St. Thomas or San Juan - Vieques. Not to mention the famed "shortest commercial flight in the world." Westray to Papa Westray - 53 to 90 seconds

Also, BTW - for test purposes the battery is lead/acid. There are lighter batteries planned.
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Old 11th Dec 2019, 19:48
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Cannot believe how small the motor is.

Half a beer barrel
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 01:03
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Originally Posted by pattern_is_full View Post
Also, BTW - for test purposes the battery is lead/acid. There are lighter batteries planned.
I am not sure where this rumour started, but this is not true, the test flight used lithium ion batteries, there is no way you could fly a plane with lead acid batteries capable of delivering the power and charge needed. Lead acid batteries store about 35-40 Wh/kg, Lithium ion is 100-265 Wh/kg.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 08:25
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I'd have some serious fire concern with electric flight. Just look up FAA's laptop cabin fire instructional video. How about batteries that can be emergency jettisoned?
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 08:32
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I guess that laptop was FAA certified and can be issued with a form 8130.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 12:38
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Originally Posted by Lantern10 View Post
Seriously looking forward to seeing the first commercial operations of an electric powered aircraft.
Yea, me too. The plane flew for 15 minutes. Now they have to figure out how to build thousands of airports spaced a maximum of 25 miles apart.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 15:35
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Originally Posted by Mozella View Post
Yea, me too. The plane flew for 15 minutes. Now they have to figure out how to build thousands of airports spaced a maximum of 25 miles apart.
I suspect that's why it's a float plane. The flight from Kenmore to the San Juan's is a blast.

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Old 12th Dec 2019, 17:22
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1000kg of lithium ion batteries would give a duration of around 20 mins assuming favorable conditions, cold weather will reduce the capacity of the batteries considerably. Maybe for a quick sightseeing trip or training it could be usefull. You would need a seriously heavy recharging supply to get a quick turnaround. Better battery technology could make duration more usefull maybe in 5 yrs time
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 21:24
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Looking at Harbour Air website, their sightseeing flights offered at Vancouver are 10, 20, 35 minutes of flight time. I expect the majority of their customer sightseeing flights could be handled by the initial batteries and no doubt there will be ongoing improvements in range as is happening with electric cars.
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Old 12th Dec 2019, 21:41
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Originally Posted by Deltasierra010 View Post
1000kg of lithium ion batteries would give a duration of around 20 mins assuming favorable conditions, cold weather will reduce the capacity of the batteries considerably. Maybe for a quick sightseeing trip or training it could be usefull. You would need a seriously heavy recharging supply to get a quick turnaround. Better battery technology could make duration more usefull maybe in 5 yrs time
The North West US and Vancouver area rarely gets that cold, plus I would think it no problem to keep the batteries warm and insulated during service. If there are technical glitches, that is what the development effort is there for.
I think the concept is quite sound and wish them all success.
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Old 13th Dec 2019, 09:03
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What is the approval process for a conversion like this that is intended to be used for commercial fare paying passengers.
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Old 13th Dec 2019, 09:36
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A new airframe and engine combination should require some new certification shouldn't it?
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