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Pilatus PC-12 down in Chamberlain, South Dakota, 9 dead.

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Pilatus PC-12 down in Chamberlain, South Dakota, 9 dead.

Old 2nd Dec 2019, 21:23
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by AviatorDave View Post
Anything known about the pilot‘s experience level? With that weather report and no de-icing available, I personally would rather go on foot.

Have not heard anything regarding the pilot other than he did not survive. Have a good friend that is flying a PC12 in the Idaho region and was impressed with the factory checkout including having a PC12 check airman fly with him for awhile, including short field, mountain type work. I think the airplne is pretty capable of handling icing conditions assuming it is operated accordingly.

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Old 2nd Dec 2019, 21:42
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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If I recall correctly the Montana accident several years ago was related to the lack of an anti-freezing agent in the fuel ?
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Old 2nd Dec 2019, 22:16
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by JLWSanDiego View Post
If I recall correctly the Montana accident several years ago was related to the lack of an anti-freezing agent in the fuel ?
Yes, for some reason the PIC, a professional pilot, did not take prist in the fuel. They ended up with a fuel tank imbalance issue and basically rolled in turning base to final. It was a group of families from So Cal with a few infants. Very sad.
That is a very capable airplane. I'd love to own one!
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Old 2nd Dec 2019, 22:28
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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at around noon on Saturday, stations around the region were reporting winds (in MPH) from NNE at between 25-30, with gusts up to 40, inconsistent with the data posted above.
I did wonder about the reported low windspeed in the METAR I posted, given the weather we had experienced the day before (north west of SD).

Since it was an AUTO METAR, is it possible that the anemometer was stuck? Is there any BITE equipment in an automated weather station?
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Old 2nd Dec 2019, 22:29
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https://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-rele...r20191202.aspx


Update on NTSB Investigation Into Fatal Crash of Pilatus PC-12 Airplane in South Dakota

12/2/2019

The National Transportation Safety Board released the following factual information Monday about the agency’s ongoing investigation into Saturday’s fatal crash of a Pilatus PC-12 airplane in Chamberlain, South Dakota.
The crash occurred at about 12:30 p.m. CST shortly after departure from Chamberlain Municipal Airport. Nine of the 12 occupants of the airplane suffered fatal injuries in the crash. The three survivors were injured.

The pilot and passengers arrived in Chamberlain on Friday, Nov. 29 at about 9:30 a.m. CST for an annual pheasant hunting trip. Shortly after arrival, the pilot purchased 150 gallons of Jet A fuel from an automated fuel pump. The airplane remained parked on the airport ramp until the accident flight on Nov. 30.


NTSB
(In this photo, taken Monday in Chamberlain, South Dakota, an NTSB air safety investigator begins the initial examination of the wreckage of the Pilatus PC-12 that crashed on Nov. 30, 2019, at 12:30 p.m. CT shortly after departure from Chamberlain Municipal Airport. NTSB Photo.)

The pilot filed an instrument flight rules plan with the Federal Aviation Administration and received a clearance to fly direct from Chamberlain, a non-towered airport, to Idaho Falls, Idaho, with a planned departure time of 12:20 p.m. CST. The plane departed Chamberlain at 12:26 p.m. CST. When the pilot did not activate the flight plan after departure, the FAA issued an alert for a missing airplane.

At 12:35 p.m. CST, an AWOS-3 automated weather observation station at the Chamberlain airport recorded weather as follows: winds from 020 degrees (north/northeast) at 6 knots (7 mph), ˝ mile visibility with moderate snow and icing, low-level windshear, and clear air turbulence conditions with overcast skies. The base of the cloud layer was recorded at 500 feet above the ground.

The airplane departed on runway 31 and crashed in a field about 1 mile north of the airport. The Pilatus PC-12 airplane is not required to be equipped with a cockpit voice recorder or a flight data recorder. Investigators will be looking for any avionics or engine monitoring equipment with non-volatile memory that could yield information relevant to the investigation.

The airplane was equipped with an automated dependent surveillance broadcast system (ADS-B), which records parameters that will help investigators determine the performance of the airplane by evaluating the flight track, altitude and speed from takeoff to the end of the flight.

Three NTSB investigators arrived at the accident site Monday afternoon after being delayed by inclement weather. Over the coming days they will work on documenting the airplane and wreckage pattern, examining its systems, flight controls, and engine. In addition, any witnesses to the crash will be interviewed. Interviews with the surviving passengers will also be requested.

Investigators are expected to complete their work in Chamberlain by the weekend. A preliminary report, detailing the factual information developed at this early stage of the investigation, will be published in about two weeks. The entire investigation, which will result in a determination of probable cause and will list any contributing factors, is expected to be completed in 12-24 months.
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Old 2nd Dec 2019, 23:44
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If you zoom the picture up it looks like ice on the leading edge of the prop blade and the leading edge of the horizontal tail.
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Old 2nd Dec 2019, 23:52
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Originally Posted by cappt View Post
If you zoom the picture up it looks like ice on the leading edge of the prop blade and the leading edge of the horizontal tail.
It does, but that photo was shot quite some time after the crash and conditions were pretty good for icing on the ground during much of that time.

Of course, the reported conditions at time of departure were just excellent for icing, also.
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Old 3rd Dec 2019, 04:36
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That one propeller blade shown on the investigator's right shows little damage and no chord-wise scratching or gouging. The other blades show spanwise deformation, but little or no chord-wise damage/marking. Was the engine producing power at impact?

Regards,
Grog
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Old 3rd Dec 2019, 04:53
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What I see in that picture (and feel free to critique):

- minimal leading edge damage to the prop blades, and the roots look feathered? Either engine problem (could include inlet icing), or intentionally stopped and feathered when pilot decided ground contact was inevitable?
- engine/prop ejected from airframe a substantial distance (60-70ft/20m?) - bent blades from tumbling across ground?
- left wing/flaps in middle-distance, cabin in background.
- hummocks on ground fouled up a possibly-more-survivable forced landing?
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Old 3rd Dec 2019, 06:03
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Was the wing clean on the ground before takeoff?

Did anybody get up on a ladder or platform to check the tail?
The operator, West Wind Aviation, had some de-icing equipment in the terminal building (see photos) at the airport. The de-icing equipment that was available to WestWind Aviation in Fond-du-Lac consisted of two ladders, a hand-held spray bottle with electric blanket and wand, and a container of de-icing fluid. However, the aircraft was not de-iced before takeoff, and the takeoff was commenced with ice contamination on the aircraft.
Canada TSB Investigation of Fond du Lac crash
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Old 3rd Dec 2019, 11:55
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According to Pilatus, the PC-12 can have a 10+1 seating configuration.
https://www.pilatus-aircraft.com/en/fly/pc-12
If it was the configuration of the accident airplane, it still means that an adult and the child of 7 were sharing a seat.
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Old 3rd Dec 2019, 17:24
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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...dunno if the intro pic is legit...

Kathryn's Report: Pilatus PC-12/47E, N56KJ: Fatal accident occurred November 30, 2019 near Chamberlain Municipal Airport (9V9), Brule County, South Dakota

...but if so that would'a been one hell of a load on a good day...
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Old 3rd Dec 2019, 18:16
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Originally Posted by BlankBox View Post
...dunno if the intro pic is legit...

Kathryn's Report: Pilatus PC-12/47E, N56KJ: Fatal accident occurred November 30, 2019 near Chamberlain Municipal Airport (9V9), Brule County, South Dakota

...but if so that would'a been one hell of a load on a good day...
That's the same photo their hometown newspaper is using; the logo of the Thunderstik Lodge, where they were staying, is visible in the photo; it's pheasant season in South Dakota; and the number in the photo matches the reported number of pax. The dead and injured listed in the news story all appear to have been male. Is that consistent with the people in the photo?
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Old 3rd Dec 2019, 19:21
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I obviously have no idea of what happened but it would seem they were pushing the bounds in many aspects (weather, pax load). Doesn't bode well...
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Old 4th Dec 2019, 02:53
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Overweight
Out of cg
Ifr
Icing conditions

You could have started the accident report before they even took off. So very very sad.
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Old 4th Dec 2019, 04:06
  #36 (permalink)  
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The reported events have me thinking of this Caravan hunter's flight accident years ago:

https://aviation-safety.net/database...?id=20040117-0
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Old 4th Dec 2019, 13:48
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Originally Posted by Sikpilot View Post
Overweight
Out of cg
Ifr
Icing conditions

You could have started the accident report before they even took off. So very very sad.
Sadly so often true with GA. I often played a game with my self heading the airport. "What would an NTSB report on my preflight activites read like if things go wrong" Had me turn around on at least one occasion.
I used to read the NTSB reports regularly and I would say that in 90% of the cases the plane should never have left the ground.

Last edited by 20driver; 4th Dec 2019 at 18:10.
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Old 4th Dec 2019, 17:25
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On what basis are we assuming "Overweight" and "Out of CG?"

We know the pilot added about 1000 lbs (150 gallons) of fuel - but did that fill the tanks?

Do we know the actual passenger weights (including minors, but also winter clothing)? Do we know who was seated where (CG)? What was the non-human payload (guns + remaining ammo + game taken)?

Do we know the actual operating empty weight of this particular aircraft?
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Old 4th Dec 2019, 18:23
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Looking online max payload on a 47 is 3800 lbs more or less. Given how things creep on planes it wouldn't surprise me if it was at least 200 lbs less.
They took on 150 gallons and would have had at least 75 ? on board when they landed. So I suspect before anyone stepped on board they had maybe 2,200 lbs to play with, 2500 max. 12 people with winter clothes will use that up without bags, guns , ammo or loot. I have never done a W&B on the PC but I was told it has a good envelope.
The NTSB will get a pretty good set of numbers on it but they must have been very close to max weight.
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Old 4th Dec 2019, 23:46
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Originally Posted by 20driver View Post
The NTSB will get a pretty good set of numbers on it but they must have been very close to max weight.
And not even mentioning snow / ice on the wings / fuselage
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