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Delta 757 hard landing this morning at Azores PDL

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Delta 757 hard landing this morning at Azores PDL

Old 19th Aug 2019, 08:53
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by golfyankeesierra View Post
Something special with PDL?
(Nice to know when diverting Mid-Atlantic)
Seasonal flight by Delta. Azores are holiday destinations. Punta Delgado airport has single runway in excess of 8000 feet.
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 09:18
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Straight-in approach on Rwy 12 (no ILS, 1% downward slope).
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 09:34
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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I wonder if PDL suffers from cross wind/wind shear like FNC in Madeira?
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 11:24
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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That is some damage!

A 23 year old airframe would put its manufacture at around the same time as Boeing was knowingly fitting sub-standard structural parts made by AHF Ducommun, to 737NGs.

Does anyone know if they supplied Boeing with parts for other models including the 757?
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 11:59
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Wonder if just a hard landing or touched down on the nose gear? Sometimes at low weights Boeing’s seem to land pretty flat making that a threat I guess
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 14:06
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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This kind of damage seems to be usually associated with nosewheel first touchdowns - often as a result of excessive speed or windshear.
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 14:22
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Sad when a 757 dies, a bit like that scene in "Marley and Me".

Boeing countered this sentimentality by making 737s so unpleasant that nobody mourns the loss of an airframe.
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 14:34
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by scotbill View Post
This kind of damage seems to be usually associated with nosewheel first touchdowns - often as a result of excessive speed or windshear.
Actually, I was thinking of what is called de-rotation damage.....nose comes down too quickly after main gear touchdown. 767's especially early ones which had a weaker structure are known for this. Pushing forward on the control column after touchdown can lead to this. Perhaps there are other variations on that theme that can give the same result.
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 14:51
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Originally Posted by punkalouver View Post
Actually, I was thinking of what is called de-rotation damage.....nose comes down too quickly after main gear touchdown. 767's especially early ones which had a weaker structure are known for this. Pushing forward on the control column after touchdown can lead to this. Perhaps there are other variations on that theme that can give the same result.
Isn't it the inertia of the tail still coming down after the main gear bottoms out?. ala the famous MD80 test flight where the roof wrinkles actually separated ?
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 15:01
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September 29, 1988 I flew one of four chartered Learjet for Eastern Airlines from Miami to San Jose, Costa Rica. I carried a couple 757 main tires and two EAL mechanics.

Seems that Eastern 757 N501EA had aborted takeoff AFTER rotation. The sudden heavy braking slammed the nose down, collapsing the nose gear and splitting the fuselage open (wiring and piping hanging out of the belly) about half way between the nose gear and the wing root.

Boeing sent a crew down and the airframe was repaired and the ship returned to service, After Eastern's demise, the airframe went to NASA as a flying laboratory.

Never a word in the papers or periodicals in the States. Not much online even today.

C2j
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 15:26
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by casablanca View Post
Wonder if just a hard landing or touched down on the nose gear? Sometimes at low weights Boeing’s seem to land pretty flat making that a threat I guess
Looking at 777 performance charts and the pitch attitude difference is approx. 0.5 degrees between light and heavy weights. Striking the nose gear first doesn't occur because of a 0.5 pitch difference on final.
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 16:10
  #32 (permalink)  
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blue up
Sad when a 757 dies, a bit like that scene in "Marley and Me".

Boeing countered this sentimentality by making 737s so unpleasant that nobody mourns the loss of an airframe.
I know the Mods don't like 'I Agree' posts but that was my thought exactly. If there was not the magic number in the title - I would not have read it. The 757 is so graceful and the winglets suit it better than others.
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 16:38
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Cubs2jets View Post
September 29, 1988 I flew one of four chartered Learjet for Eastern Airlines from Miami to San Jose, Costa Rica. I carried a couple 757 main tires and two EAL mechanics.

Seems that Eastern 757 N501EA had aborted takeoff AFTER rotation. The sudden heavy braking slammed the nose down, collapsing the nose gear and splitting the fuselage open (wiring and piping hanging out of the belly) about half way between the nose gear and the wing root.

Boeing sent a crew down and the airframe was repaired and the ship returned to service, After Eastern's demise, the airframe went to NASA as a flying laboratory.

Never a word in the papers or periodicals in the States. Not much online even today.
It gets a brief mention in both the NTSB and FAA accident summaries. The aircraft in question (actually N523EA) was barely 2 years old at the time of the event and is still flying today with Fedex.



https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/200310
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 16:39
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Boeing could solve a few problems by restarting an updated 757 production line and calling it a 737-900
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 19:31
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Is this incident listed at the NTSB? Can't seem to find it
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 19:45
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Arrow

Originally Posted by RatherBeFlying View Post
Boeing could solve a few problems by restarting an updated 757 production line and calling it a 737-900
Except the 737-900 already exists!
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 20:26
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by atakacs View Post
Is this incident listed at the NTSB? Can't seem to find it
If there's an investigation (which is likely) it will be the responsibility of the Portuguese GPIAA. The NTSB website will, in due course, contain just a reference to the foreign investigation (see, for example, the AAL B738 at Kingston, investigated by the JCAA).

The doesn't, however, preclude the NTSB from making Safety Recommendations in connection with the event if it sees fit.
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 20:35
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Out Of Trim View Post
Except the 737-900 already exists!
How about B.737-1000
or B.757-400 ??
pedant mode off.
Be lucky
David
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 20:58
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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odd that the internal colour of the EA 757 Door 1 left is painted black?
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Old 19th Aug 2019, 23:55
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by misd-agin View Post
Looking at 777 performance charts and the pitch attitude difference is approx. 0.5 degrees between light and heavy weights. Striking the nose gear first doesn't occur because of a 0.5 pitch difference on final.
while you are probably right and this probably has no bearing on the 757, there can be a fairly large difference in the 777 LR and freighters. Due to shorter fuselage and rudder arm you normally don’t see speeds less than 140 and actually on the freighters that used to require ballast fuel at very low weights now they actually have ref increasing when below 155 tons( approximately) so you could be 20 plus knots faster than a 777-300 Er at same weight.....often leading to floating and hence having to fly it on to the runway.
when I say Boeing lands flat I am primarily comparing to MD-11 that had the nose up around 7 degrees on touchdown so for me it feels flat!
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