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UA 863 SFO-SYD 787-9 7/12 quick return after reported engine trouble

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UA 863 SFO-SYD 787-9 7/12 quick return after reported engine trouble

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Old 13th Jul 2018, 16:40
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UA 863 SFO-SYD 787-9 7/12 quick return after reported engine trouble

UA 863 SFO-SYD 7/12/2018 787-900 emergency turn around and return to SFO shortly after take-off due to (reported, passengers) flames from engine number 1. Passengers quoted they were told (doubtful) "Engine seized up"?? Track shows circling presumably for fuel dump before return to SFO. No official word, yet, of course.

https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/20...ng-sfo-sydney/
https://flightaware.com/live/flight/...545Z/KSFO/KSFO
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Old 13th Jul 2018, 17:42
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I was in line at 1L when I heard a pilot from that aircraft report the failure and his intentions to deviate from the assigned departure. A pilot from another aircraft on the ground reported seeing flames trailing the engine. The statement by the passenger that it happened 40 minutes into the flight must have included all the time from pushback to takeoff, as there were lengthy delays getting airborne at San Francisco last night.


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Old 13th Jul 2018, 20:03
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Listening to the liveatc.net tapes, UA 863 reported an engine failure to the tower controller and said they were going out two miles and then turning to a heading of 310, probably one of those company generated engine-out procedures that ATC knows nothing about. Works great in the sim. The tower missed the engine out comment and kept telling United to follow the GNNRR TWO departure. United tells the next controller that they had a surge but still have power on the affected engine. They say they will probably come back but need to make some calls. These days you are supposed to engage system matter experts and arrive at a consensus to make a command decision, right? United is told that the plane behind them on the runway saw flames coming out of the engine on the takeoff roll and they say, yep, we felt it.

United requests to climb on flight plan course pending the decision to return to SFO. After a few minutes, Oakland Center asks UA 863 if they are declaring an emergency. UA 863 says yes, they want to return and dump fuel for at least 35 minutes and they want the equipment standing by when they land. United says the left engine had the surge but 'we now have total use of it'. United is given box pattern vectors for the fuel dump. When finished they are vectored for the ILS 28R.

UA 863 lands on 28R, gets checked by the fire crew, taxis to the gate, another day at the office.
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Old 13th Jul 2018, 23:48
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UA 863 reported an engine failure to the tower controller and said they were going out two miles and then turning to a heading of 310, probably one of those company generated engine-out procedures that ATC knows nothing about. Works great in the sim. The tower missed the engine out comment and kept telling United to follow the GNNRR TWO departure.
Could have declared a PAN. Oh wait, they're in America.
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Old 14th Jul 2018, 00:43
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Originally Posted by Capn Bloggs View Post
Could have declared a PAN. Oh wait, they're in America.
Neither PAN nor MAYDAY are part of American aviation vernacular, at least for domestic airspace. Some of us Americans who flew international were quite well trained to use PAN or MAYDAY out of country.
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Old 14th Jul 2018, 17:21
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Originally Posted by aterpster View Post
Neither PAN nor MAYDAY are part of American aviation vernacular, at least for domestic airspace. Some of us Americans who flew international were quite well trained to use PAN or MAYDAY out of country.
Well, maybe just for those General Aviation slackers...

Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) - Page 417

1. Distress and Urgency

Communications

a.

A pilot who encounters a distress or urgency

condition can obtain assistance simply by contacting

the air traffic facility or other agency in whose area of

responsibility the aircraft is operating, stating the

nature of the difficulty, pilotís intentions and

assistance desired. Distress and urgency communica-

tions procedures are prescribed by the International

Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), however, and

have decided advantages over the informal procedure

described above.

b. Distress

and urgency communications proce-

dures discussed in the following paragraphs relate to

the use of air ground voice communications.

c.

The initial communication, and if considered

necessary, any subsequent transmissions by an

aircraft in distress should begin with the signal

MAYDAY, preferably repeated three times. The

signal PAN−PAN should be used in the same manner

for an urgency condition.

d. Distress

communications have absolute priority

over all other communications, and the word

MAYDAY commands radio silence on the frequency

in use. Urgency communications have priority over

all other communications except distress, and the

word PAN−PAN warns other stations not to interfere

with urgency transmissions.
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 05:09
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The AIM is only advisory...show me the FARs
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 05:27
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Originally Posted by Pugilistic Animus View Post
The AIM is only advisory...show me the FARs
Show me the FAR that says you "MAY NOT" takeoff or land on a taxiway?
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 06:21
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I knew there were no FARs about it..." I'm declaring an emergency" has proven time and time again that it gets US ATC on board immediately..

As far as other FIRs your company will have procedures based on the relevant AIP for information of FIR entry and emergency RT protocol
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 06:39
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Originally Posted by barrow View Post
Show me the FAR that says you "MAY NOT" takeoff or land on a taxiway?
14CFR 91.13
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 09:54
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Originally Posted by Pugilistic Animus View Post
14CFR 91.13
Yes Sir, And this IS the reg the FAA cites you with when you don't follow the AIM, because, after all, the "AIM is advisory only"
Where exactly does it say in 91.13 that you "may not takeoff or land on a taxiway" again?
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Old 15th Jul 2018, 10:24
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It depends what falls under FAR Part 91.13: What Is ?Careless or Reckless?? | BCA content from Aviation Week
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