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Lap top and tablet ban

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Lap top and tablet ban

Old 29th Jun 2017, 08:14
  #381 (permalink)  
 
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OK, ban all PEDs except cell phones...

But what about the crews themselves especially the deadheading ones that are now passengers (technically) and may have a laptop or iPad they use for work?
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Old 29th Jun 2017, 08:50
  #382 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Heathrow Harry
Fine but what does all that goobledy gook actually mean?

It doesn't give any guidance as to what they will or will not allow - am I supposed to wait until I arrive at security to find I have to hand over my laptop to be checked in at (say ) Theifrow?
Characteristically, the DHS press release doesn't give specific details and doesn't give an implementation date. Unless there's more detailed information somewhere, airport security people all over the world are going to be making up policy on the fly (so to speak) and tending towards what they think is 'safe'.
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Old 29th Jun 2017, 09:30
  #383 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by finfly1
Malta huh? Did the delegates stow their laptops in the below decks baggage area then, or carry them on board?
I'd bet that the DHS delegates to the Malta conference used a US government aircraft – there are no direct flights from US to Malta and they could surely justify going private. So either there was no security check, or they used their status to bypass it. So I'd bet they took their laptops on board, going and coming.

That's what annoys me about the laptop ban – and most of the US's other security-theatre – and US immigration too – the rule-makers themselves, and the people the rule-makers listen to, can bypass a lot of the hassle, so they've no incentive to make things better.
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Old 29th Jun 2017, 11:44
  #384 (permalink)  
 
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If you think banning laptop and tablets are bad wait until you read about this coming to your local TSA check-in points...

The USA is turning into a Police state!

TSA begins searching books before travelers board planes
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Old 29th Jun 2017, 12:27
  #385 (permalink)  
 
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A summary that I read was that the airline/airport has to have in place security that meets a set of standards that will be set down by the DHS. The standards appear to be both pre-checking of pax (TSA PreCheck/Global Entry) and better physical screening of devices. IFF the airline/airport does not meet those standards by their implementation date then pax electronics larger than a smart phone will be completely banned from that airline's aircraft or from all the aircraft from that airport. The EU said it is dangerous for these devices with their batteries to be put in the hold, DHS agreed and therefore they will not be allowed in the cabin -OR- the hold, they cannot travel.

I would suspect that crew electronics for work EFBs etc., would need to be catalogued in some way by the airline so they can be confirmed, and by definition the crews would have been 'pre-checked'.

The reason for the concern on electronics that I read was that multi-cell batteries were being modified to have only one or two cells operating and the other - up to 7 (?) cells could be explosive. And of course many tablet type 'laptops' have totally different battery layouts so 'turning them on' proves nothing.

I have had a set of 'academic papers' that were packed as a block examined as presumably the scanner showed them but the operator could not work out what it was. I think that may be the real reason for just riffling through pages not reading the content.

I am very frequent SLF whenever I am carrying _anything_ that might look strange on a scanner (e,g, Large can of coffee; beanbag base for a satnav) I put it in a separate plastic bag so it is easier for the scanner operators to sort out. It also shows that you are being overt about it and not trying to 'conceal' something of interest. So I would probably do the same with a pile of papers in the future.

The best security is knowing the individuals as with the El Al security screening. The problems come when everyone is given the same 'we think you may be a risk' screening and limits because of some idea of 'not being discriminatory'. This overloads the system and actually reduces security.
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Old 2nd Jul 2017, 16:23
  #386 (permalink)  
 
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Abu Dhabi airport now exempt from US laptop ban

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The capital of the United Arab Emirates became the first city to be exempt from a U.S. ban on laptop computers being in airplane cabins, the country’s flag carrier said Sunday.
More from: https://apnews.com/b9881e600be9406c99c6eb98d8d5afe3
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Old 3rd Jul 2017, 09:01
  #387 (permalink)  
 
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A couple of days old, from my usual source:

On 28 June 2017, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced new enhanced security measures as an alternative to global restrictions on the carriage of large portable electronic devices (PEDs) in the cabin on flights to the U.S.

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Security Directives and Emergency Amendments have now been issued directly to the 180 affected airlines.

A high-level description of the measures are as follows:

· There will be a phased introduction between 21 and 120 days of enhanced security measures at 280 last point of departure (LPD) locations, across 105 countries and 180 airlines. The enhanced measures will involve a combination of overt and covert measures.

· Within 21 days, each location will be required to have explosive trace detection (ETD) technology in place at the central search and/or boarding gate applied in a continuous and random manner. Those locations that do not meet this requirement within the 21 days will face either a PED ban or suspension of flights to the U.S.


· Airlines that are impacted by the existing PEDs restrictions will be able to request that TSA remove those restrictions based on their meeting the new security requirements.


· Within 120 days, all foreign carriers with U.S. operations will be required to make security program changes in line with U.S. carrier standards. This will include training, passenger questioning, and oversight of aircraft security.


· Further information can be found here. https://www.dhs.gov/news/2017/06/28/...-united-states


IATA is pleased that DHS has agreed not to pursue a broad PED plan in favor of alternative security measures that we believe are globally more effective in addressing short and longer term security threats. We also are encouraged by DHS’s decision to provide a path to the removal of the existing PED restrictions. We continue to communicate that DHS and affected host states must work together to ensure equitable implementation of the enhanced measures between authorities, airports, and airlines. We will work with DHS to ensure that airline costs and operational impacts are minimized.

The DHS enhanced measures are consistent with the current form of ICAO’s Global Aviation Security Plan as well as emerging standards regarding the use of screening technology for explosives.
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Old 6th Jul 2017, 13:58
  #388 (permalink)  
 
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All the media reports are saying that the laptop ban on certain airlines (xx, EK, QR, TK) have been lifted, and the ban on SV will soon be lifted.

Funny, I thought it was certain airports that were banned, not airlines ...
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Old 7th Jul 2017, 13:29
  #389 (permalink)  
 
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I am sure glad that the authorities are coordinating and cooperating on this critical matter:

The UK?s laptop security predicament | ATW Editor's Blog

The Association of Asia Pacific Airlines (AAPA) provided those numbers and many of its member airlines are concerned. “Implementation of these new security directives will necessitate a number of procedural and operational changes by airlines and airports around the world. Airlines, airports and the relevant government authorities will need to work closely together to avoid unnecessary disruption to the travelling public,” AAPA director general Andrew Herdman noted.

Also, it’s puzzling why the new rules apply to inbound flights to the US, but not outbound. Strong as US airport security now is, if there are new technologies being pursued to potentially slip explosives through the passenger screening process, then shouldn’t the new screening rules apply to the US also? And why target only international flights? The US is the world’s largest domestic aviation market and most terrorist incidents in the US since 9/11 have been inflicted by American citizens living in the US.

Finally, there’s the UK security question. Soon after the US implemented its laptop ban in March, the UK issued a similar ban on flights to Britain from a list of six Middle East and African countries. The UK ban appeared to have been prompted by the US ban, but the two countries’ intelligence authorities apparently did not agree on where the threat lay; they had different target lists.
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Old 7th Jul 2017, 15:40
  #390 (permalink)  
 
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Also, it’s puzzling why the new rules apply to inbound flights to the US, but not outbound. Strong as US airport security now is, if there are new technologies being pursued to potentially slip explosives through the passenger screening process, then shouldn’t the new screening rules apply to the US also? And why target only international flights? The US is the world’s largest domestic aviation market and most terrorist incidents in the US since 9/11 have been inflicted by American citizens living in the US.
This is unarguable logic considering the porous northern and southern borders.
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Old 8th Jul 2017, 00:46
  #391 (permalink)  
 
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The logic only holds if the porous borders make the risks symmetric and evenly distributed.

But they are not.
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Old 10th Jul 2017, 12:32
  #392 (permalink)  
 
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But they are not -Yet
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Old 23rd Jul 2017, 17:52
  #393 (permalink)  
 
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Here are is the latest recommended best practice as per IATA:

https://www.iata.org/whatwedo/safety...on-baggage.pdf
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