Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Flight Deck Forums > Rumours & News
Reload this Page >

United Airlines safety Training

Rumours & News Reporting Points that may affect our jobs or lives as professional pilots. Also, items that may be of interest to professional pilots.

United Airlines safety Training

Old 31st Jan 2016, 05:57
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: WA STATE
Age: 78
Posts: 0
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
United Airlines safety Training

Article in WSJ

starts

New United Air Pilot Training Could Raise Safety Bar for Industry

Latest initiative could have some impact on whether record low airline accident rates continue

By Andy Pasztor

Jan. 30, 2016 6:16 p.m. ET

United Continental Holding Inc.’s bid to revamp training for its pilots, starting with an extra day of instruction for all cockpit crews, harks back to groundbreaking efforts the airline championed four decades ago.
The latest initiative, according to proponents, also could have some impact on whether record low airline accident rates continue across the U.S. and other regions.

The carrier confirmed on Friday that over the next three months, it will call back each of its 12,000 pilots for additional training aimed partly at bridging the generation gap between veteran captains and younger co-pilots, or first officers.

Find a nonpay link to the rest
CONSO is offline  
Old 31st Jan 2016, 07:31
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: 41S174E
Age: 56
Posts: 3,031
Received 388 Likes on 98 Posts
Hold me up! Don't tell me the is an Airline CEO out there that has vision and an understanding of what's happening in the industry???
Congratulations that man/ woman.
framer is offline  
Old 31st Jan 2016, 13:35
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: KMCO
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If you Google "United Calls in Pilots for Extra Training", you can see the article in its entirety. Some tidbits:

By the end of April, each aviator at the nation’s No. 3 airline by traffic will be required to attend a day of classroom instruction focusing on various safety issues, enhanced teamwork on the flight deck and the changing role of pilots amid rapid industry shifts.


None of the safety incidents that helped prompt the training—which ranged from dangerously low fuel to an emergency pull-up maneuver to avoid crashing into the ground—resulted in an accident. But United considered them serious enough to send a dramatic two-page safety bulletin to its pilots early last year. The document highlighted major risk factors, including lax discipline and poor cockpit communication.


Begun on Jan. 19 after nearly a year of planning and development, the training is intended, among other things, to encourage veteran captains to more-effectively mentor co-pilots, and to help junior aviators be more assertive with senior captains if they spot problems or dangers. United spokesman Charlie Hobart said Friday the idea was to improve communication between the two groups by teaching situational awareness and as a way to bridge the generation gap.
The latest move also comes as United—along with most of the U.S. airline industry—faces an array of challenges posed by accelerating retirements of veteran pilots and broader changes in how airline crews perform their jobs. The makeup of crews means co-pilots often are younger and have less overall flight inexperience, than in the past.

At the same time, increasing reliance on cockpit automation can lead to pilot inattention or confusion in the event of an emergency. Undue dependence on computers can degrade a pilot’s manual flying skills. For years, despite the high degree of safety in the U.S. airline industry, aviation regulators have struggled with the best way to foster greater pilot professionalism across the industry.
NWstu is offline  
Old 31st Jan 2016, 13:55
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: EU
Posts: 641
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Just out of professional interest, what were the "groundbreaking efforts the airline championed four decades ago"?
golfyankeesierra is offline  
Old 31st Jan 2016, 13:59
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Australia
Posts: 4,184
Likes: 0
Received 3 Likes on 3 Posts
will call back each of its 12,000 pilots for additional training aimed partly at bridging the generation gap between veteran captains and younger co-pilots, or first officers.
Wasting everyone's time. A talk-fest. A typical lip service exercise. What is needed if the company is serious, is not more feel-good additions to the various manuals or exhorting captains to be nice to their copilots. It should be a lot more raw data handling in IMC during every simulator session. More purely visual approaches and circuit handling in the simulator. Get rid of the flight directors during simulator practice.

I very much doubt if the company will encourage pilots to practice manual raw data on line. Most wouldn't know how to, anyway. Each session should include 50 percent manual raw data no automatics. It is the only way to reverse the trend to automation addiction. IMHO
Centaurus is offline  
Old 31st Jan 2016, 14:03
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ijatta
Posts: 435
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by golfyankeesierra
Just out of professional interest, what were the "groundbreaking efforts the airline championed four decades ago"?
CRM according to Wikipedia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crew_resource_management

http://lessonslearned.faa.gov/L1011E...crmhistory.pdf

Last edited by wanabee777; 31st Jan 2016 at 14:14.
wanabee777 is offline  
Old 31st Jan 2016, 17:58
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Rockytop, Tennessee, USA
Posts: 5,899
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Wasting everyone's time. A talk-fest. A typical lip service exercise.
These additional Kumbaya training sessions were all the rage with U.S. airlines in the '90's so maybe it's time to repeat the cycle.

The captain is a 'facilitator' who promotes 'consensus' on a 'plan of action' etc.

It's mostly an American thing I suppose, as the 1999 FAA CRM paper cited above says about exporting CRM:

In many cases, the concepts presented were incongruent with the national culture of the pilots.
From the WSJ article:

None of the safety incidents that helped prompt the training—which ranged from dangerously low fuel to an emergency pull-up maneuver to avoid crashing into the ground—resulted in an accident. But United considered them serious enough to send a dramatic two-page safety bulletin to its pilots early last year. The document highlighted major risk factors, including lax discipline and poor cockpit communication.
Things like playing games on the cell phone while descending in Metric RVSM airspace as pilot flying seem to be considered a workplace entitlement with some of my colleagues. If I show more than mild displeasure, my coworkers will clam up and respond tersely for the rest of the trip. So, I must accommodate my colleagues' procedural deviations to ensure effective communication and team building etc...

What is needed if the company is serious, is not more feel-good additions to the various manuals or exhorting captains to be nice to their copilots. It should be a lot more raw data handling in IMC during every simulator session. More purely visual approaches and circuit handling in the simulator. Get rid of the flight directors during simulator practice.
I'm just as guilty as anyone of being rusty on stick and rudder flying after decades of FMS glass cockpit flying. Sim training has evolved into a rapid fire check the boxes, perform the maneuvers session with little actual training and the last three items pencil-whipped to get you out of the box on time. Remember how LOFT, AQP and CQ were going to eliminate the 'batting practice' of the earlier sim programs? Maybe we do need some batting practice to build proficiency on handling skills.
Airbubba is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 02:03
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: 41S174E
Age: 56
Posts: 3,031
Received 388 Likes on 98 Posts
Things like playing games on the cell phone while descending in Metric RVSM airspace as pilot flying seem to be considered a workplace entitlement with some of my colleagues. If I show more than mild displeasure, my coworkers will clam up and respond tersely for the rest of the trip.
Man alive that is bad. My copilots will ask me if it is ok to send a text when we are on the ground and the after shut down checklist is complete. Answer " sure thing, thanks for asking" .
framer is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 10:26
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Marlow (mostly)
Posts: 361
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
playing games on the cell phone while descending in Metric RVSM airspace as pilot flying
Are you serious?? Please give some clues as to what airline so I can avoid it!
slast is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 12:37
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: In a far better place
Posts: 2,481
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Are you serious?? Please give some clues as to what airline so I can avoid it!
Perhaps the enquiry should be reworded as to which airline DOES NOT.

I hope we can all agree CRM IS an essential component, no limited to aviation to any team oriented operation.

Gone are the days of the old definition of CRM as described by the older generation.

CRM. Yeah... We're the crew... You're the resource... And I'm the management.... Any questions?
How many times has that concept created either a smoking hole in the ground or scattered debris at the arrival airport under CAVOK conditions?
captjns is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 18:55
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: 41S174E
Age: 56
Posts: 3,031
Received 388 Likes on 98 Posts
If it is accurate that there are Airlines out there where it is not unusual for someone to be on their mobile while the aircraft is in motion ( PF or PM doesn't matter) then something needs to be done to regain an appropriate culture within those Airlines.
I would be fully supported by my company for standing down an F/O that did that at my next port of call. If the companies are not providing that level of support it puts the Captains in a tight spot. From my cushy well supported place within the industry I still think it is the Pin C's responsibility to the passengers to not allow this behaviour though.....they aren't being paid to serve at a coffee shop so why are they behaving like that.....actually........are they being paid similar wages? Is that the root of the problem?
framer is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 19:29
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Rockytop, Tennessee, USA
Posts: 5,899
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
The document highlighted major risk factors, including lax discipline and poor cockpit communication.
Man alive that is bad. My copilots will ask me if it is ok to send a text when we are on the ground and the after shut down checklist is complete. Answer " sure thing, thanks for asking" .
Are you serious?? Please give some clues as to what airline so I can avoid it!
Perhaps the enquiry should be reworded as to which airline DOES NOT.
I try not to crack the whip much, it's just not my style. But it seems to me that unauthorized cockpit use of cellphones, laptops and tablets is making a comeback after a brief respite in the wake of the Northwest 188 MSP overfly.

Just as I push the power up for a heavy crossing takeoff, I've had the other pilot at the controls whip out his iPhone and start recording video 'for his son'. Many folks seem to think it is ok to text while I'm taxiing even though it is explicitly prohibited several places in our pubs. And, turning into the blocks some will have their face buried in their phone messages instead of looking out. If I try subtlety and ask 'clear right?' they say 'I already called it clear, maybe you didn't hear me' and keep typing a reply heads down on the phone.

Anyway, I try to dissuade my colleagues from erroneous behavior that might lead to undesirable outcomes (or whatever the correct warm and fuzzy CRM terminology calls it). Some of these folks will absolutely pitch a fit if you attempt to offer corrective advice.

A few years ago we had some remaining 'cowboys' in the left seat who wouldn't do the paperwork on a crossing and only did checklists when an LCA was onboard. Over time they were retired or, in some cases, weeded out by the training department.

For a while it was great in my opinion, things were pretty much standard and by the book. You could hop in a plane with folks you had never met and take the crew around the world, making those minor adjustments to each other's workflow. You knew what to expect and what was expected.

Now it seems that some folks act like flying the plane is a minor distraction to their video game or magazine reading. Maybe this attempt to 'look cool' is a legacy of the cowboys who viewed themselves as renegades of the FOM.

And, the folks I work with are talented and competent, experience levels are still high on my fleet. I'd be happy to swap seats will almost anyone.

But at times I wish they would just put down the damn iPhone and help me fly the plane.
Airbubba is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 19:53
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Not far from a big Lake
Age: 81
Posts: 1,461
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Bubba.
Got any experience raising kids? How about teen agers?
Machinbird is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 20:42
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: UK.
Posts: 4,391
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Airbubba, that's a bit of a worry. Like you I preferred the relaxed approach but I wouldn't have stood for dicking about with 'phones while taxiing and the 'I already called it clear, maybe you didn't hear me' guy needs to be dealt with.
Basil is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 21:01
  #15 (permalink)  

Only half a speed-brake
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Commuting not home
Age: 46
Posts: 4,297
Received 3 Likes on 3 Posts
Many folks seem to think it is ok to text while I'm taxiing even though it is explicitly prohibited several places in our pubs. And, turning into the blocks some will have their face buried in their phone messages instead of looking out. If I try subtlety and ask 'clear right?' they say 'I already called it clear, maybe you didn't hear me' and keep typing a reply heads down on the phone.
Now, there's an argument to let the F/Os taxy!
FlightDetent is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 21:08
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: NV USA
Posts: 260
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This is simply a required part of the response to the FAA's "what are you going to do to rectify this?" initiative.
cappt is offline  
Old 1st Feb 2016, 21:30
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: surfing, watching for sharks
Posts: 4,057
Received 25 Likes on 18 Posts
I've seen a rise in what AB talks about. At my airline and others as I JS to/from work. If this is an answer to a FAA query as to what your going to do, it's a valid, timely question.
West Coast is offline  
Old 2nd Feb 2016, 06:36
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: 41S174E
Age: 56
Posts: 3,031
Received 388 Likes on 98 Posts
I'm really glad I don't have to deal with what you deal with AB.
What would happen if you said during the preflight briefing ( with the entire crew) " Righto, you know the flight time and the expected weather, I don't want any of us to use our mobile phones onboard while the engines are running today, unless you are in the bunk, as I think it is starting to become a distraction. Does anyone have anything to add? Ok let's go to the aircraft and have a good day"
That way, everyone knows what behaviour is expected of them and you haven't singled out your F/O, also, if he or she now goes ahead and does it anyway it's a sure thing that you don't really have command of the ship and you can move quickly to address that.
What do you think AB?
framer is offline  
Old 2nd Feb 2016, 06:56
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Only occasionally above FL50
Age: 71
Posts: 208
Likes: 0
Received 5 Likes on 4 Posts
I regularly do work at a major London department store where most of the staff are on minimum wage. Using a mobile on the shop floor is a serious disciplinary offence. If they want to use one during their breaks they must be off the shop floor. I can't say I see staff using them in coffee shops or pubs either very often and I suspect that in the UK such rules are widespread.

When I visit offices, I don't see staff at work playing games on their phones and making / taking personal calls seems rare.

Why is it, apparently, different on flight decks? Is it because pilots consider the work so undemanding they need something to keep their brains occupied? If so, sounds like things have got seriously bad. Perhaps the flight deck screens should be generating challenges that require a response every so often - but that wouldn't encourage pilots to look out of the window when taxiing - or flying in class G airspace!
Andrewgr2 is offline  
Old 2nd Feb 2016, 07:32
  #20 (permalink)  
Trash du Blanc
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: KBHM
Posts: 1,185
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I'm not seeing this. Not at my airline. Maybe a little bit at cruise but that's it.

My phone gets turned off when I get off the bus. Turned back on when I get on the bus.
Huck is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.